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Rough landing...


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#1 SeaW0lf

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 20:50


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#2 J2_Bidu

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Posted 09 August 2018 - 22:55

Thanks for the share, Seawolf. I enjoyed a lot watching this.
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#3 SeaW0lf

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 00:35

Dang, the video is stressful! I was going along with him, thinking that he was going to make it, which was already chilling, and then all of the sudden... Whaam!

 

It caught me totally off guard  :icon_e_biggrin:


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#4 J2_Bidu

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 08:11

I felt he was turning too hard for his energy in those last seconds. It looked like he would stall any moment. He was very considerate staying away from the highway.

We had a case in Portugal where a Cessna 152 lost engine 4 minutes after take off and the flight instructor grabbed the controls from the student and glided to a crowded beach. He was criticized for not having crashed in the sea. Two people on the beach died.

It was very interesting to go through the thought process of a good pilot like this.
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#5 SeaW0lf

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 16:57

I felt he was turning too hard for his energy in those last seconds. It looked like he would stall any moment. He was very considerate staying away from the highway.

We had a case in Portugal where a Cessna 152 lost engine 4 minutes after take off and the flight instructor grabbed the controls from the student and glided to a crowded beach. He was criticized for not having crashed in the sea. Two people on the beach died.

It was very interesting to go through the thought process of a good pilot like this.

 

I think I recall the Portugal incident. It was sad. I have to analyze the video, but I think that when he started to stall he had no engine anymore. Then he pulled to the right to land. I just thought it was unfortunate because he landed so bad that the P-51 might have got a hell of a beating. The accident might have cost him a small fortune, although he walked alive.


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#6 J2_Bidu

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 18:00

Never flew a plane IRL, and have done little IL2. In my ignorance it looks like in the end he should have lowered his nose more before pulling up.
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#7 Deciman

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 15:19

Anyways......

He made it down alive and only with beeing hurt very light
He caused no damage to anything but the plane
And he had to make seveal decisions in a very short time....


And I fully agree with him:

The worst case scenario for every pilot is an engine, that goes strange and normal again and again.
One second you think 'land now wherever possible' and 3 seconds later you think 'all is well again'
and that again and again....


Well done!

 

Deci


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#8 Chill31

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 15:08

The thing a lot of people forget is that it is always better the land halfway down the runway and go off the end than to land short.


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#9 J2_Bidu

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Posted 14 August 2018 - 15:14

Unless the end is a cliff to the sea maybe... (Madeira island 1977 crash)
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#10 Guster

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 17:16

Loads of decisions to be made very quickly. I think the most interesting part is when they discuss pre-historic brain vs modern thinking patterns which can be applied to many, many other contexts as well. I'd love to read some of those studies.


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#11 SeaW0lf

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 21:30

Yes, a few months ago the ex-husband of a friend (my ex-boss, a nice guy) died trying to get back on the runway after the engine of his plane cut-off. I just found out a couple of weeks ago (I had lost contact with them). I went to search and found that most of the deaths in takeoffs are because the pilot tries to return to the runway; even though it is a subject that everyone is instructed to lower the plane's nose and land wherever they can ahead. Then I went to do a ROF test with the SE5a. I cut the engine on the takeoff (on top of some trees) and tried to make the turn without lowering the nose. The stall was immediate and I crashed below nose first. It really did surprise me. On the second time I got a near stall on the turn (I was expecting it) but I was able to recover, since I entered the turn with the nose a bit lower, and make a decent landing. After that, the plane did not catch me by surprise anymore and I could make a decent landing in all situations. In other words, like they say in MMA, it is the punch that you don't see that knocks you out. Meaning the first time, out of the blue, when you never expect it. On this case I think simulators can help to prevent such accidents if pilots get trained in these take-off situations.


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