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#41 unreasonable

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 04:18

the book's implicit argument being, then, "we're due."

 

Not really: the author also notes that periods of high and rising inequality have persisted in the past for hundreds of years, that modern medicine has made the likelihood of truly horrible plagues less likely and that warfare is now more about technology than mass mobilization. Civil war is still a possibility, although unlikely, but in the past has rarely been associated with reduced inequality over any sustained period. 

 

Those of us - like me - born in developed countries after WW2 grew up assuming that our highly equal societies were normal, would continue and that developing nations would follow the same path.  I came to the realization that these assumptions were incorrect after living in a developing country for some years - and reading a lot of economic history. This book wraps up a lot of these themes with a survey of the data and is well written too.


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"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard." H. L. Mencken


#42 TheBlackFalcon

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 16:20

I have just finished reading "Germany's War" by John Wear, which details the Allied atrocities against Germany during and after WWII while also putting German atrocities in a much more realistic and balanced view.  Though some sources to Wear's piece can be considered controversial, he nonetheless has written a good read (however, somewhat redundant at times) in which a good summary has been provided that has been corroborated by other historians.

 

Currently though, I have just begun reading "Pyrrhic Victory" by Doughty, which is a discussion of the French Army's organization and actions prior to and during WWI...

 

Doughty provides an interesting history as to Josef Joffre eventually became the French Army's Chief of Staff prior to the outbreak of the war.  In Meyer's book, "A World Undone", he supports the idea that Joffre was a controversial choice due to his engineering background instead of that an infantry officer.  However, Doughty does not see anything controversial is such an appointment as he had quite a few supporters at this juncture in time...


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Black Falcon


#43 1PL-Husar

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 19:20

I have just finished reading "Germany's War" by John Wear, which details the Allied atrocities against Germany during and after WWII while also putting German atrocities in a much more realistic and balanced view.

I do not have that book, but i like to know how he explained wehrmacht war crimes and Holocaust  "in a much more realistic and balanced view", also Marshall Plan which helped west Germany to stand on feet?


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#44 =HillBilly=

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 21:30

 i like to know how he explained wehrmacht war crimes and Holocaust  

Simply, to people like john wear "IT DIDN'T HAPPEN"


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     So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

 
 


#45 Plank

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 15:13

Slaughterhouse-five.

 

by Kurt Vonnegut.

 

The Russian way.

 

by Zita Dabars.

 

 

 

I was hoping this thread would closed on my insistence, but it is still "open". 

PM's to our caretaker have been ignored. I shrug. Things change.  

I have been writing a bit, a scifi fantasy thing in disjointed parts.  

None of it makes much sense but then I am not sure it is supposed to.  

You can find it on Reddit if you look hard enough. There are some pictures    

to go with it. Abstract things. Something something. I like them. People  

read my scribbling but never leave comments. I wonder. sometimes.   

Any way I have delved back into Arma 2 and DayZ for a lark. And am enjoying   

the helicopter flying. A few tweaks here and there has made it much more flyable.  

In fact it's pretty nice flying around Chernarus. It's a very good map. and they have bugs.   

and birds and dragon flies. It's very clever. The loach (OH-6) is still my baby. It's very nice.   

Well I probably won't come back here very often. I am tired of it. The bickering.    

Maybe one day someone will dig up my twaddle and wonder: who was this twit?          

 

Salute!  

 

Help yourself to the marmalade...   

 

Plank.


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Captured again!

 


#46 Zooropa_Fly

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 15:41

Plank you disappoint me sometimes.

If anyone knows how to shut down a thread......

 

Take care pal, look in again sometime !

 

:icon_e_salute:


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".. and they'll send you home in a pine overcoat, with a letter to your Mum,

    Saying find enclosed one son one medal and a note, to, say, he, Won".


#47 =HillBilly=

=HillBilly=
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Posted 22 May 2017 - 15:50

Slaughterhouse-five.

 

by Kurt Vonnegut.

 

The Russian way.

 

by Zita Dabars.

 

 

 

I was hoping this thread would closed on my insistence, but it is still "open". 

PM's to our caretaker have been ignored. I shrug. Things change.  

I have been writing a bit, a scifi fantasy thing in disjointed parts.  

None of it makes much sense but then I am not sure it is supposed to.  

You can find it on Reddit if you look hard enough. There are some pictures    

to go with it. Abstract things. Something something. I like them. People  

read my scribbling but never leave comments. I wonder. sometimes.   

Any way I have delved back into Arma 2 and DayZ for a lark. And am enjoying   

the helicopter flying. A few tweaks here and there has made it much more flyable.  

In fact it's pretty nice flying around Chernarus. It's a very good map. and they have bugs.   

and birds and dragon flies. It's very clever. The loach (OH-6) is still my baby. It's very nice.   

Well I probably won't come back here very often. I am tired of it. The bickering.    

Maybe one day someone will dig up my twaddle and wonder: who was this twit?          

 

Salute!  

 

Help yourself to the marmalade...   

 

Plank.

Who was that masked twit? :P  ;)

Salute Plank :icon_e_salute:


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     So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

 
 


#48 J5_Spyboy

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 08:22

Arma2 or Arma3, which is best?
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#49 US103_Baer

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 14:05

I'm reading this
http://www.theaerodr.../f-12-p-13.html

The Aerodrome forum archives from 'aircraft' section. I'm at page 13 of 243. I find it brilliant to just dip into when i have a few minutes spare.
The gentlemen discuss in a tone slightly different to that of the rof forum, but hey, it was a different era..2002 where I'm at now.
So far I've found out about SE5a gun alignment, Mercedes DIII engine development, the plural for Albatros, the plural for Pfalz, theories on Guynemer's death and way more than I'll ever need to know about German paint pigments.

Gripping stuff obviously, but I'm liking it, and maybe learning a little too.
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#50 J2_Adam

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 01:59

Reading threads until they get deleted.  :huh:


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#51 J5_Klugermann

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 02:38

Reading threads until they get deleted.  :huh:

 

Lol, you must be a fast reader.


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#52 J2_Adam

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 02:47

I guess I log in at the right time.
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#53 J5_Klugermann

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 03:35

There were some good ones today.


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#54 Plank

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 14:48

Carrie

 

by Steven King.


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Captured again!

 


#55 TheBlackFalcon

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 19:23

I am currently in the middle of Robert Doughty's, "Pyrrhic Victory", which is a history of French infantry strategy and operations during WWI.

 

The book is a little dry considering that the author is a former US brigadier general in the US Army and taught history at West Point for 20 years.  However, it does have its great moments and the information is fascinating.

 

It took me a while to get into the rhythm of the writing style but once I did the book's reading pace began to pick up.

 

Doughty outlines fairly well and somewhat clinically what most of us who study WWI already know; the French infantry soldier was incredibly brave but was terribly misused by highly incompetent senior leadership.  To be sure, the French Army did have some very good field commanders but decision making for most strategy was handled at the very top levels.

 

Up through 1917 Josef Joffre was the chief of the French Army and he just about destroyed the entire capability of his forces by throwing them up in deadly frontal assaults against well-entrenched German positions.  Joffre couldn't see anything other than the frontal assault since he was a complete believer in the French doctrine of "elan", which stipulated that you never defend, you always attack. Nivelle, who was a successor to Joffre or who at least led the disastrous "Nivelle Offensive" in 1917 continued this stupid doctrine until Petain, probably France's finest infantry general, took command in the same year and halted the useless loss of French life with such a ridiculous doctrine by making substantial changes in how the infantry was used.

 

One would think that after suffering some extremely serious setbacks early in the conflict one would devise a new strategy to deal with a highly modernized and advanced opponent as the Germans were.

 

Many have asked as to what the French could have done differently in this situation and after studying Doughty's work I believe I have come to a possible resolution to French Army impotence.  Instead of wasting time on large scale attacks initially, devise the development of commando units that could have been inserted behind the German lines to disrupt their rear thereby forcing a semi two-front engagement.  As the German positions were harassed from the rear, launch small but concerted attacks to their front.

 

French Commandos could have been transferred by ship on the Channel to edge their way behind German lines.  Once a commando force had grown large enough by slowly feeding more such units behind the lines over time, larger attacks from the rear and front could have been performed.

 

The Germans had such units even in 1914 and were highly successful with them as they were used as forward disruptors and skirmishers during the initial major movements of the German Army at the start of the conflict in 1914.  These commando units were the original incarnation of the "Storm Troopers" of later WWII fame.

 

John Tiller Software has a sophisticated strategy game available entitled, "France 1914", where this theory may be able to be tested out for those who may be interested.


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Black Falcon


#56 testid

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 06:35

currently, I'm reading error messages from RoF insisting that I D/L an update. Between time, I'm googling how the hell I got the beast to run triple wide five years ago.


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#57 testid

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 06:43

success! c'n'etait pas un suces d'elan, mais des recherches. Allons!


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#58 J2_Bidu

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 07:53

I'm reading "Portuguese Aviators (1920-1934) - Adventure of the Pioneers".

This includes, for instance, the first crossing of the South Atlantic by Gago Coutinho and Sacadura Cabral.


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#59 Plank

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 20:24

this is gripping stuff:

 

https://www.research...l_Actuator_Disc

 

https://www.nkj.ru/a...articles/10523/

 

( I use google babel fish ocular implant to read in real time.)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_fin

 

I particularly like how the attribution to the development is almost an aside.

 

I think, ahem, Mr E. Musk owes a large degree of success to the chaps who slogged away at the principle of the Lattice wing. 

they are probably the single most pivotal hardware upgrade on rockets/etc that is not hidden away internally. (excuse the pun)

 

Lattice wings are simply a blinking good idea.

 

and you can use them as air brakes, fold for stowage. and they are strong.

 

My goodness biplanes have come a long way....

 

Salute!

 

P.


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Captured again!

 


#60 J5_Klugermann

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 13:58

I'm reading "Portuguese Aviators (1920-1934) - Adventure of the Pioneers".

This includes, for instance, the first crossing of the South Atlantic by Gago Coutinho and Sacadura Cabral.

 

I thought that would have been one of those books with no pages. I stand corrected.


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#61 US103_Hunter

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 14:32

Re-Reading this little gem. It's a great short work on the Lafayette Escadrille and their USAS counterpart.

 

http://www.usaww1.co...adrille.php4#LE


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#62 J2_Bidu

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 18:32

I thought that would have been one of those books with no pages. I stand corrected.


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#63 J2_Bidu

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 18:34

Since the portuguese were the first to cross the south Atlantic by sea, it is only fair they should be the first by air too. Took three planes to do it, though... :-P nearly got themselves killed.
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#64 Plank

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  • LocationNew Zealand.

Posted 27 July 2017 - 03:07

http://www.dtic.mil/.../u2/a220095.pdf

 

Gosh, flash radiography.

Well I'll eat my tin mug...

 

Shelling has stopped for the while and I have been sent a pigeon or two from St Petersburg. Several in fact. Loads.

 

Saving up to buy a passport/ "papers"...

 

What fun! Learning to speak the lingo, it's hard yakka... ( that's a pun too...)

 

Salute!

 

Planky. ( Experienced decoder, safe breaker and quantity surveyor.)


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Captured again!

 


#65 Plank

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  • LocationNew Zealand.

Posted 08 September 2017 - 11:34

A Farewell to Arms. 

 

by Ernest Hemingway

 

https://en.wikipedia...arewell_to_Arms

 

The problem is that when I read it I hear William S.Burroughs utter the immortal line:  "Ernie is a real General lover." in his extremely sedated drawn out drawl.

 

S! P. ( Toilet roll replenisher, propeller shaper and civil transport engineer.)


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Captured again!

 


#66 FalkeEins

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 18:26

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance - Rob Pirsig


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"Stop pulling so hard. You don't have to get someone under the gunsight right this second to win the fight." - Go_Pre


#67 samp

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 15:26

I just finished reading Gerald's Game by Stephen King. With the movie adaptation coming out, I wanted to make sure I read the book first. Hopefully they don't ruin it. I am not a fan of watching the movie before reading the book. I will probably find my next read in this thread. 


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#68 dixieflyer

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 15:46

I'm reading this
http://www.theaerodr.../f-12-p-13.html

The Aerodrome forum archives from 'aircraft' section. I'm at page 13 of 243. I find it brilliant to just dip into when i have a few minutes spare.
The gentlemen discuss in a tone slightly different to that of the rof forum, but hey, it was a different era..2002 where I'm at now.
So far I've found out about SE5a gun alignment, Mercedes DIII engine development, the plural for Albatros, the plural for Pfalz, theories on Guynemer's death and way more than I'll ever need to know about German paint pigments.

Gripping stuff obviously, but I'm liking it, and maybe learning a little too.

Ahhhh yes. I certainly had some good times over there over the years. Man, that takes me back Paul. 

I'm currently reading The First Team and the Guadalcanal Campaign: Naval Fighter Combat from August to November 1942 by John Lunsdstrom. I reread The First Team: Pacific Naval Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway the other month, and enjoyed it even more the second time around. Reread Eagles of the Southern Sky as well, it's the only time someone has tried to write a history of the Tainan Air Group.

 

Yeah, I'm on my PTO kick again. 

 

SWMBO gave me Kilduff's rewrite of his biography of Degelow last Christmas, and have it put up for when I'm in the mood. Read the first one he did and enjoyed it thoroughly. (Named the new German Shepherd pup we got last May Karl Degelow. :)  )

 

Warren


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History is the lie we all agree upon.


#69 Zooropa_Fly

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 16:52

Tragedy and Hope - by Carroll Quigley.


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".. and they'll send you home in a pine overcoat, with a letter to your Mum,

    Saying find enclosed one son one medal and a note, to, say, he, Won".


#70 US103_Baer

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 02:24

Tragedy and Hope - by Carroll Quigley.


Jaw-dropping book. Damn long though. I never completed it.
His 'Anglo-American Establishment' I did finish however. Difficult to wade thru with all the names and dates, but if the data is accurate...
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#71 FalkeEins

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 16:56

Can anybody suggest a good biography on Udet?


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"Stop pulling so hard. You don't have to get someone under the gunsight right this second to win the fight." - Go_Pre


#72 Plank

Plank
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Posted 24 October 2017 - 02:08

For whom the bell tolls. - by Ernie Hemingway.

 

Wow it's almost three books in one. Which is a problem....

The dialogue drags on and the monologues are skippable.

But there are some pearls in it, so it's worth the slog.

The wading though some parts can sap your enthusiasm to continue on

but the action, the characters stories and studies and pretty good, and the

overall atmosphere of the Spanish civil war is a good historical caricature.

( I think that makes sense)

 

7 out of 10. a bit half baked with too many ingredients....

 

Mr Hemingway has a predilection with tragedies....

 

Salute!

 

Plank. ( Blanket designer, metal fabricator and artesian well borer.)


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Captured again!

 


#73 Plank

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 18:53

May I present:

 

A Primer of Phonetics

By Henry Sweet.

 

I am enjoying Mr Sweets writing style while learning a thing or two...

 

Salute! 

 

Plank. 


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Captured again!

 


#74 SeaW0lf

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 19:50

Voices in Flight: Conversations with Air Veterans of the Great War: by Mauriel Joslyn and Anna Malinovska. It is a great read and with memorable passages.

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"There will be honor enough for us all."

#75 J2_Adam

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 21:58

Thanks to my friend J2_vonKost (aka US103_Hunter) I had an early Christmas gift in the mail. 

Attached Files


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#76 =HillBilly=

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 23:35

@ J2_Adam    You should have blacked-out your personal information on the shipping labels.


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     So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

 
 


#77 J2_Adam

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 00:19

@ J2_Adam    You should have blacked-out your personal information on the shipping labels.

Wow! didn't even think about that. Thanks HB/


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#78 =J99=Sizzlorr

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:38

I'm reading "Open Cockpit" by Arthur Gould Lee. Before that i read Rickenbacker's book, Richthofens "Roter Kampfflieger" and Ernst Udets book "Mein Fliegerleben".


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#79 J2_Bidu

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 22:32

I'm reading "Open Cockpit" by Arthur Gould Lee. Before that i read Rickenbacker's book, Richthofens "Roter Kampfflieger" and Ernst Udets book "Mein Fliegerleben".

 

Found all those really great, especially Gould Lee's ("No Parachute" as well), but haven't read Rickenbacker's. Is that "Rickenbacker: An Autobiography" ?


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#80 SeaW0lf

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 22:58

Found all those really great, especially Gould Lee's ("No Parachute" as well), but haven't read Rickenbacker's. Is that "Rickenbacker: An Autobiography" ?

 

Might be Fighting the Flying Circus, his war memoirs. Free read, the same for Richthofens book. Both great books.


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"There will be honor enough for us all."


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