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#1 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 09:17

We have now moved into century of Battle of Somme, creation of Jastas, beginning of organised air combat and start of RoF career mode ;) - i.e. events revelants to us RoF players. I'm making this thread to swap facts and war stories related to WW1 aviation that seem important to us for some reason, exactly 100 years after they happened. Of course, different things seem important for different people - me, I hope to write a lot about my squadrons namesake here :) . Let's see if this thread will still be there in two years.

 

To begin, today is exactly 100 years since Oswald Boelcke arrived at Velu and assumed command of Jasta 2, on 27th August 2016. The unit has existed "on the paper" for some time already before its leader arrived, but was far from operational. With only three officers, 64 NCOs and no aeroplanes, J2 was pretty much a virtual squadron that day :). This was going to change.

 


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#2 FourSpeed

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 21:56

In early August 1916, a little known pilot, Raymond Collishaw joins RNAS's 3rd Wing, flying Sopwith 1/2 Strutters out of Ochey, France.

 

While it will still be a couple months before he will score his very first victory, his greatest successes of WWI will occur in a little less than a year when he leads "Black Flight" to great heights as one of the most effective squadrons in WWI.  He will finish the war as one of the top scoring aces.

 

But for now, it is just a beginning....

 

 

Regards,

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#3 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 00:46

... meanwhile, Albert Ball was already flying Nieuports in no.60 squadron, stalking German two-seaters from below then downing them with upwards aimed overwing Lewis gun.

 

100 years ago a rather well known fight took place. Day earlier, Boelcke received two Fokker D.III biplanes for his Jasta, along with certain Leutnant Manfred von Richthofen and NCO Max Muller. On September 2nd, Boelcke took a Fokker up and scored his 20th victory, an D.H.2 from No.32 squadron, marking his return on Western Front. Captain Robert Wilson managed to land his pusher despite destroyed elevator, and was later invited to J2 aeroderome as a guest. His photograph with Boelcke, along with letters both pilots sent home, were widely popularised since.

 
327B850C00000578-0-image-m-69_1458733581
 
 
 
You will be astonished to hear of my twentieth, because you will have imagined me still organising my Staffel but not yet flying.
A few days ago Fokker sent two machines for me, and i made my first flight in one of them the day before yesterday. There was fair amount of enemy aerial activity at the front. These fellows have grown very impudent.[...] I saw shell bursts west of Baupame. There I found a BE, followed by three Vickers single seaters, i.e. artillery plane with its escort. I went for the B.E. but the other three interrupted me in middle of my work, and so I beat a hasty retreat. One of these fellows thought he could catch me and gave chase. When I lured him somewhat away from others, I gave battle and soon got to grips with him.  I dod not let him go again; he did not get another shot on me. 
When he went down the machine was woobling badly.[...] The machine landed north-east of thiepval; it was burning as the pilot jumped out and beat his arms  and legs because he was on fire too. 
 
 
 
It is some consolation to me that I was brought down by Captain Boelcke, the greatest German airman, and that my life was preserved in fashion that is almost miraculous.[...] When on reconnaissance work I saw a German scout intending to polish off one of our slow old B.E.s and came just in time to rescue it. After I loosed off a couple of shots at the German, he went into turn and flew home. I was fool enough to chase him and failed to notice that he only wanted to lure me further into his territory. When I followed him about fifteen miles behind German lines, he turned round and attacked me by climbing above me at fabulous speed [...] I hardly let off a couple of shots before my gun jammed, so I could not fire a single round more. [...] I did only thing left to me and fled to get out of the way of better machine and superior pilot. I tried to shake him off by all sort of tricks, but he followed all my movements magificently and sat on my neck the whole time. He shot away all my controls, with exception of two that were jammed, he shot holes in my machine, shot throttle away when I had my hand on it; he put some holes in my tank and a couple in my coat when it was soaked in petrol. Naturally I lost all control of my machine[...]. I sat there, pterry dizzy and waiting for the crash[...]  but when about fifty feet I made a desperate tug at the stick and somehow obtained enough control at last moment to dodge the crash and bring off some sort of landing; which however set my machine and my coat in fire. I managed to jump out and pull my coat off without getting burnt. [...]Next day Boelcke invited me to his aerodrome and entertained me in his mess. We were also photographed together. I got a very fine impression of him both as pilot and a man, and this fight will remain the greatest memory of my life, even though it turned out badly for me.  

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#4 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 12:31

The first kill in Albatros D.I (or so Wiki says) was scored 100 years ago by Otto Höhne. His unit received first six Albatros fighters 16th September and Höhne took off in one the same evening, downing an F.E.2.b from No.11 squadron. The crew survied and was captured.

 

OttoHohne.jpg

 

Otto Höhne would score five times more before wound prevented him from flying in WW1. In WW2, he was flying bombers and shined again during Rotterdam Blitz. During battle of Rotterdam the Germans have threatened to bomb the center of Rotterdam if defending troops don't surrender and the Dutch were stalling negotiations; the ceasefire was negotiated when bombers were already on their way. Otto Höhne (aged 45 at this time) was leading one of bomber columns, and he noticed and properly interpreted red flares fired by surrendering Dutch troops; he aborted the attack preventing some damage to the city. Leader of other column did bomb the city.

He survived crash of He-111, and lived ot old age of 74, dieing in 1969.


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#5 FourSpeed

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Posted 16 September 2016 - 23:40

It is the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.

 

Beginning 100  years ago yesterday, it will continue for several days (until the 22nd). It is one of several battles which occur during the Somme Offensive intended to bring about the defeat of the Central Powers on the Western Front.

 

While the battle of Flers-Courcette did not achieve its ultimate objective, it will be seen as a tactical victory for the Entente with the capture of the towns of Flers, Martinpuich, and Courcelette, advancing the front lines by more than 2 km in places.

 

Of further note, it is also the first battle where tanks were utilized and it also is the first time that soldiers representing the Canadian Corps and the New Zealand Division take part in combat on the Somme.

 

It is also around this time that one of Germany's greatest pilots, Oswald Boelcke, is tasked with organizing the Central powers air assets into the specialized fighter units that will be seen throughout the war.  On Sept. 16 1916, Jagdstaffel 2, established the just the previous month, receives several Albatros D.I scouts. It is with these aircraft, lead by Boelcke himself flying one of the first Albatros D.IIs, that the Central Powers will begin to re-establish the air superiority they previously enjoyed during the Fokker Scourge.

 

220px-Oswald_Boelcke_%28ca._1916%29.jpg

Oswald Boelcke in 1916 (Wikipedia)

 

 

Regards,

4 :icon_e_salute:


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#6 j9_viper

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 05:05

imagine having no air conditioning back then


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#7 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 18 September 2016 - 19:31

That should have been written yesterday but, family and Black September were more urgent...

100 years and a day ;) ago Jasta 2 took up in their six new Albatros fighters, as supposedly first ever organised effort to get air superiority over an area, rather than mere hunting for kills. The Kette encountered flight of B.E.2s escorted by F.E.2s, and downed three of the latter; more German planes were attracted by the fight and most of British planes were reported destroyed. Pilots who scored his first confirmed victory that day were Manfred von Richtofen and Hans Reimann, another hand-picked pilot who were to score two more victories before dying rammed by British two-seater! 

 

Meanwhile, the status quo was changed once more.This morning I've run into enemy patrol with two of my pilots (Lieuts. Reimann and Richtoffen) We ceared them up thgoughly; each of us got one. I engaged the leaders machine, which I reconized by its streamers, and forced it down. [...] The Staffel is making itself! We have got five English machines since yesterday evening!

 

 

 On the previous day we had received our new aeroplanes and the next morning Boelcke was to fly with us. We were all beginners. None of us had had a success so far. Consequently everything that Boelcke told us was to us gospel truth. Every day, during the last few days, he had, as he said, shot one or two Englishmen for breakfast.
The next morning, the seventeenth of September, was a gloriously fine day. It was therefore only to be expected that the English would be very active. Before we started Boelcke repeated to us his instructions and for the first time we flew as a squadron commanded by the great man whom we followed blindly.
 
We had just arrived at the Front when we recognized a hostile flying squadron that was proceeding in the direction of Cambrai. Boelcke was of course the first to see it, for he saw a great deal more than ordinary mortals. Soon we understood the position and everyone of us strove to follow Boelcke closely. It was clear to all of us that we should pass our first examination under the eyes of our beloved leader.
 
Slowly we approached the hostile squadron. It could not escape us. We had intercepted it, for we were between the Front and our opponents. If they wished to go back they had to pass us. We counted the hostile machines. They were seven in number. We were only five. All the Englishmen flew large bomb-carrying two-seaters. In a few seconds the dance would begin.
 
Boelcke had come very near the first English machine but he did not yet shoot. I followed. Close to me were my comrades. The Englishman nearest to me was traveling in a large boat painted with dark colors. I did not reflect very long but took my aim and shot. He also fired and so did I, and both of us missed our aim. A struggle began and the great point for me was to get to the rear of the fellow because I could only shoot forward with my gun. He was differently placed for his machine gun was movable. It could fire in all directions.
 
Apparently he was no beginner, for he knew exactly that his last hour had arrived at the moment when I got at the back of him. At that time I had not yet the conviction "He must fall!" which I have now on such occasions, but on the contrary, I was curious to see whether he would fall. There is a great difference between the two feelings. When one has shot down one's first, second or third opponent, then one begins to find out how the trick is done.
 
My Englishman twisted and turned, going criss-cross. I did not think for a moment that the hostile squadron contained other Englishmen who conceivably might come to the aid of their comrade. I was animated by a single thought: "The man in front of me must come down, whatever happens." At last a favorable moment arrived. My opponent had apparently lost sight of me. Instead of twisting and turning he flew straight along. In a fraction of a second I was at his back with my excellent machine. I give a short series of shots with my machine gun. I had gone so close that I was afraid I might dash into the Englishman. Suddenly, I nearly yelled with joy for the propeller of the enemy machine had stopped turning. I had shot his engine to pieces; the enemy was compelled to land, for it was impossible for him to reach his own lines. The English machine was curiously swinging to and fro. Probably something had happened to the pilot. The observer was no longer visible. His machine gun was apparently deserted. Obviously I had hit the observer and he had fallen from his seat.
 
The Englishman landed close to the flying ground of one of our squadrons. I was so excited that I landed also and my eagerness was so great that I nearly smashed up my machine. The English flying machine and my own stood close together. I rushed to the English machine and saw that a lot of soldiers were running towards my enemy. When I arrived I discovered that my assumption had been correct. I had shot the engine to pieces and both the pilot and observer were severely wounded. The observer died at once and the pilot while being transported to the nearest dressing station. I honored the fallen enemy by placing a stone on his beautiful grave.
 
When I came home Boelcke and my other comrades were already at breakfast. They were surprised that I had not turned up. I reported proudly that I had shot down an Englishman. All were full of joy for I was not the only victor. As usual, Boelcke had shot down an opponent for breakfast and every one of the other men also had downed an enemy for the first time.
 
I would mention that since that time no English squadron ventured as far as Cambrai as long as Boelcke's squadron was there.

 

 


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#8 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 10:04

The French squadrons were already experimenting with 150hp SPAD 7s 100 years ago. 23rd September 1916 Sgt Paul Sauvage of Escadrille N65 scored a victory in this machine, while Georges Guynemer of N3 downed two and claimed unconfirmed third same day!  Some of the first victories by SPAD scout. 
 
Same day Guynemer was shot down by French AAA, losing fabric from one wing and radiator water tank. He managed to get SPAD out of spin, crash-land it and walk away.
 
Only the fuselage was left, but it was intact. The SPAD is solid - with another (aeroplane), I would be thinner than piece of paper.

 

 

 
In RFC, No.60 squadron (of Albert Ball Nieuport victories fame) has received their first few SPADs 7 to play with, too. 

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#9 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 10:32

28th September 1916 Capt. Ernest Cecile Foot of No.60 RFC squadron was credited with downing Albatros two-seater flying a SPAD 7, one of the (if not "the") first SPAD kills in RFC.


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#10 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 11:17

Bit of musings loosly tied to todays date.

 

When you read of early Jasta 2 it is presented as crandle of German fighter pilots; unit of promising, ace material pilots hand-picked then trained by Boelcke. But, when we try to recall these aces, we mostly think of Manfred von Richthoffen. Maybe Boehme and Muller, too, although former is mostly remembered for ramming Boelcke and latter as a Bawarian, rather than Jasta 2, pilot. The rest are  some other guys who somehow didn't become so successful. The reason is, their careers were cut short.
 
Here is Jasta 2 scoreboard at late evening, 30th September 1916. Let's have a look on this crew, for in few months they all will be gone from Jasta 2 roster:
 
Boelcke: 29
Richthofen 3
Bohme 2
Hohne 2
Reimann 2
Viehweger 1
Gunther-
Muller-
Phillips-

Gunther and Viehweger were duds; they both have been posted away from fighter units with no future victories, one to bomber Staffel, one to desk job at Idflieg. They survived the war and passed into relative obscurity. 
 
Philips died two days later, killed by AAA.
 
All others became aces.
 
Bohme and Muller have been posted away to other squadrons (not unlike Richthofen), became legends of their own - Bohme scored 24 victories and Max Muller (later Max Ritter von Muller) 36. Both earned Pour le Merite and came back to die as Jasta Boelcke Staffelfuhrers. 
 
Two equally promising future aces, Reimann and Hohne, were wounded and left Jasta Boelcke before 1917. Leopold Reimann (not to be confused with Hans Reimann from post #7, who was already dead) held score equal to Richthofens (5) when he was wounded in action. He married, was re-posted as instructor in Jastaschule and died in January 1917, early victim of Albatros D.III wing collapse. Hohne, mentionad above in post #4, scored 6 (higher than Mullers) when he was hospitalised; he survived the war, flew He-111 bombers in the next one, and died in 1969 - first man to score a victory in Albatros, last early ace of J2 to die, likely last of Boelckes aces to fly a combat sortie. 
 
There was more would-be Red Barons among Boelckes disciples that were not present 30th September. Lt Hans Reimann (mentioned in post #7) was already dead; this four-victories pilot was scoring higher and much faster  than MvR (only 2 kills!) when his Albatros was rammed by RFC two-seater. Hans Immelmann will join Jasta 2 in early October and became 6-victories ace before dying in action. And of course, Stefan Kirmayer who took over as squadron leader afer Boelceks death, brought his score from 3 to 10 during his short time with Jasta 2 (von Richthofen brought it from 5 to 8 in same time), before dying. 
 
Quite possibly, the greatness (or luck!) of Richthofen, Bohme and Muller lied in surviving Autumn 1916, where five other equally promising pilots died, and in learning form their mistakes. Whether this was luck or good judgement, whether these pilots were scoring as fast as MvR then died was because they were equally promising or more greedy, will of course never be surely known.
 

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#11 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 11:06

100 years ago Captain Ernest Leslie Foot from No.60 squadron, mentioned two posts ago as the first RFC pilot to score a kill in a SPAD, was shot down in flames by Hans Immelmann (no, not that Immelman). Foot survived the crash unharmed and soon was sent to England for a rest. Immelamann himself was shot down in flames, killing him, 3 months later.


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#12 Cybermat47

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 12:16

Was Hans Immelman related to Max Immelman?
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"What was the purpose of it all? What's the price of a mile?! Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army on the march! Long way from home, paying the price in young men's lives! Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army in despair! Knee-deep in mud, stuck in the trench with no way out!"
- From The Price of a Mile by Sabaton.

#13 MarcoRossolini

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 12:37

What an excellent thread.

 

Long may it live!


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#14 PatAWilson

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 14:28

Was Hans Immelman related to Max Immelman?

 

No.  They spelled their last name differently.  

Hans Imelmann

Max Immelman


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#15 J5_Gamecock

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 22:33

100 years ago today...

 

  Flying a Halberstadt DII, Oberleutnant  Hans Berr of Jasta 5, Scored victories number 7 and 8 when he shot down FE2b 4933 and an observation balloon near Maurepas France.

 

  Attached File  220px-Berrhanspilot.jpg   15.16KB   0 downloads


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#16 J2_Mr_Tree

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 11:40

Gamecock lovely that j5 joined trupo's thread keep it coming! :D

I don'r know about these things :P so this is a very helpfull thread. ;)
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#17 Cybermat47

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 07:29

Today, the Royal Australian Air Force held celebrations at RAAF Williamtown for the centenary of Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 SQNs RAAF, then AFC.

Celebrations included flypasts of a Wedgetail, four Hornets, a Super Hornet, a Wirraway, a Pilatus PC-9, and a Hawk.
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"What was the purpose of it all? What's the price of a mile?! Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army on the march! Long way from home, paying the price in young men's lives! Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army in despair! Knee-deep in mud, stuck in the trench with no way out!"
- From The Price of a Mile by Sabaton.

#18 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 09:13

Also today, 100 years pass since death of Oswald Boelcke.

 

A six-man Jasta 2 flight including Boelcke,  Manfred von Richthofen and Erwin Böhme engaged their usual adversaries, D.H.2s from No.24 squadron. During the fight, Böhme dived after Boelcke after same target, perhaps trying to shoulder-shoot, and when Boelcke pulled up his top wing hit Böhmes' wheel, damaging fabric. Boelcke lost part of the top wing (accounts vary) but supposedly managed to ditch the plane... then died in impact because he has not strapped himself to the cockpit. What is sure is that he died immediately on impact.

 

(Lanoe Hawker)
 

It was after about five minutes of strenous fighting that two HA collided. One dived on Lieut. Knight, who turned left-handed. The HE zoomed right-handed, and his left wing collided with the right wing of another HA which started to dive on Lieut. Knight. 

Bits were seen to fall off; only one HA was seen to go down and it glided away east, but it was very shortly lost to sight, as the DH2s were to heavily engaged to watch it.

 

 

(Manfred von Richthofen)
 

ONE day we were flying, once more guided by Boelcke against the enemy. We always had a wonderful feeling of security when he was with us. After all he was the one and only. The weather was very gusty and there were many clouds. There were no aeroplanes about except fighting ones.
 
From a long distance we saw two impertinent Englishmen in the air who actually seemed to enjoy the terrible weather. We were six and they were two. If they had been twenty and if Boelcke had given us the signal to attack we should not have been at all surprised.
 
The struggle began in the usual way. Boelcke tackled the one and I the other. I had to let go because one of the German machines got in my way. I looked around and noticed Boelcke settling his victim about two hundred yards away from me. It was the usual thing. Boelcke would shoot down his opponent and I had to look on. Close to Boelcke flew a good friend of his. It was an interesting struggle. Both men were shooting. It was probable that the Englishman would fall at any moment. Suddenly I noticed an unnatural movement of the two German flying machines. Immediately I thought: Collision. I had not yet seen a collision in the air. I had imagined that it would look quite different. In reality, what happened was not a collision. The two machines merely touched one another. However, if two machines go at the tremendous pace of flying machines, the slightest contact has the effect of a violent concussion.
 
Boelcke drew away from his victim and descended in large curves. He did not seem to be falling, but when I saw him descending below me I noticed that part of his planes had broken off. I could not see what happened afterwards, but in the clouds he lost an entire plane. Now his machine was no longer steerable. It fell accompanied all the time by Boelcke's faithful friend.
 
When we reached home we found the re port "Boelcke is dead !" had already arrived. We could scarcely realize it.
 
The greatest pain was, of course, felt by the man who had the misfortune to be involved in the accident.
 
It is a strange thing that everybody who met Boelcke imagined that he alone was his true friend. I have made the acquaintance of about forty men, each of whom imagined that he alone was Boelcke's intimate. Each imagined that he had the monopoly of Boelcke's affections. Men whose names were unknown to Boelcke believed that he was particularly fond of them. This is a curious phenomenon which I have never noticed in anyone else. Boelcke had not a personal enemy. He was equally polite to everybody, making no differences.
 
The only one who was perhaps more intimate with him than the others was the very man who had the misfortune to be in the accident which caused his death. Nothing happens without God's will. That is the only consolation which any of us can put to our souls during this war.

 

 

"Father of the air fighting tactics", Boelcke was both a gifted, self taught ace, a theoretican who could formalise his experience into rules that he could teach to others, a leader in the air and somewhat of voice of sanity urging development of fighter arm when Fokker Scourge left German leaders complacent. He had received virtually every medal and decoration that could be bestowed on him; the Pour le Merite, Knights Cross of Royal House Order of Hohenzollern, Both classes of Iron Cross, Military Merit Orded, Knights Crosses from Wurrtemburg, Ernestine House Order, House Order of the Bear, Friedrich Cross, Macklenburg-Strelitz Cross, Austrian Order of Iron Crown, Bulgarian Bravery Award and Ottoman Imtiaz Medal. He also received civilian decoration, Prussian Lifesaving Medal, for saving a drowning French boy by jumping into canal after him. I believe this happened in Douai area, when he was flying Eindeckers with Max Immelaman.

Boelcke with French nurse Blanka in Fokker cockpit, Douai aerodrome.

 

 

B45Mk_JIEAAPyoe.jpg

 

 

e31e977dd6c213cdf097c6f84ceb0ac5.jpg


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#19 arthursmedley

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 12:42

e31e977dd6c213cdf097c6f84ceb0ac5.jpg

 

Something about this picture....a handsome young man and a pretty girl....in an absurd war that consummed Europe....


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#20 J5_Gamecock

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 15:46

 100 years ago today...

 

  Leutnant  Renatus Theiller, of Jasta 5, shot down a British FE near Combles. Although reported as his first confirmed kill, he was credited with two kills prior to this. Depending on the source, Theiller was credited with 10 or 12 victories before being killed on March 24,1917. 

 

 There is also some controversy surrounding his death.Credit is usually given to a Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter from 70 squadron, however, Canadian ace Billy Bishop has also been credited with his death in some sources.


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#21 Ice_Age

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 19:46

Something about this picture....a handsome young man and a pretty girl....in an absurd war that consummed Europe....

 

Is anyone thinking what I'm thinking? :D


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#22 J2_Adam

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 19:59

Yes, Ice. Grab her by the .....

 

......arm


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Hauptmann 
Jagdstaffel 2 "Boelcke"
 
xfnaaHq.jpg
 

#23 Ice_Age

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 20:13

No, no, I wasn't thinking something crass like that!  I just wondered if there is something going on between Boelke and this "Nurse Blanka". I've wondered the same thing about MvR and his nurse friend too.  When you see a photo like this, it makes their characters a little less 1 dimensional. 


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#24 Tycoon

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 21:09

No, no, I wasn't thinking something crass like that! 

You can't blame us though. :P


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Plenty of room at the Hotel RiseofFlight, you can check-out any time you like, but you can never leave. 


#25 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 22:24

No, no, I wasn't thinking something crass like that!  I just wondered if there is something going on between Boelke and this "Nurse Blanka". I've wondered the same thing about MvR and his nurse friend too.  When you see a photo like this, it makes their characters a little less 1 dimensional. 

Boelcke was a passionate dancer and before the war much of his personal life lied in social "circles", one made of young ladies and officers and devoted to literature, other of officers, gentlemen and ladies devoted to dancing.


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#26 Ice_Age

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 22:33

found this at SimHQ, quoting from the Aerodrome website: "one of two nursing sisters who visited the aerodrome at Douai with an injured Leutnant. Both "sisters" wanted very much to make a flight, so Boelcke gave them each a short trip around the field."


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#27 =CfC=FatherTed

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 23:00

Something about this picture....a handsome young man and a pretty girl....in an absurd war that consummed Europe....

 

...he was in the army which was occupying her country.  Sorry Trupo, for derailing your thread (delete this post if you wish), but I think there's more to this image than "...a handsome young man and a pretty girl....".


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#28 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 23:26

... no, that's part of the reason behind the photo. Boelcke was by all accounts an aimable person; although he did not *need* company, he was easily making friends and had no personal enemies. The nurses, and French family whose house he was biletted in, were no exceptions. IIRC he made friends with their kid daughter and she kept writing to him after he moved away. Humans will be humans, able to make friends once they can talk to each other.


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#29 J5_Gamecock

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 23:43

  100 years ago today.....

 

    Jasta 5 was active again. Leutnant  Renatus Theiller scored another victory, this time over a Nieuport,  near Combles at approx. 3:30 in the afternoon. About an hour later, Oberleutnant  Hans Berr shot down his 9th enemy aircraft, a Caldron, south of Courcelette.


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#30 No.42_Cuban

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 23:51

Absolutely LOVE this thread! Thanks and salute Trupo and all others S! :icon_e_smile:


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#31 J5_Gamecock

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 00:52

 100 years ago today.....

 

  A  busy day for Jasta 5. Oberleutnant  Hans Berr earned his tenth,(and final), victory over a Be2 near Courcelette. Vizeflugmeister Max Winkelmann also claimed a victory over a Be in the same action.Though this claim went unconfirmed, (Unconfirmed by army means unconfirmed!) ,RFC no.7 reported a lost Be in this area.

 

  The very same day, Leutnant  Hermann Goring was seriously wounded in a fight with six Nieuports. While able to land his aircraft, his wounds forced him to leave Jasta 5.

 

 Hans Berr would be awarded the Blue Max the following December.

 

  An excerpt from Jagdstaffel 5, by G.K.Merrill...

 

  Hans Berr " ..His abilities to teach while leading became widely recognised  and the high command took him away from his command several times to give presentations,lectures and to temporarily lead the Jastaschule I at Valenciennes. Valuable as this service was,it no doubt reduced his victory total...."  Comparing Berr to Boelcke  "..Both were held in high esteem by the air service and used in a variety of tasks for the development of fighter aviation. Both were excellent air fighters,but more importantly,both were natural leaders who got the most from their men.....The careers of Boelcke and Berr were so remarkably similar that it even extended into the manner of their deaths,each would die in a mid air collision with one of their pupils.."

 

 


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#32 J5_Gamecock

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 22:56

 100 years ago today.... 

 

   Leutnant  Renatus Theiller  scored his fifth kill on this day when he flamed an FE2  of 22nd squadron west of Le Mesnil. This made him Jasta 5's third "Ace" behind Hans Muller and Berr.

 

 Later that day, Leutnant Hans Gutermuth claimed his second victory, also an FE, shot down near Bapaume. Gutermuth's first victory came when he was still attached to FFA 44


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#33 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 14:06

100 years ago air fighting went to new level...

 

 

A raid on ammunition dump at Vraucourt north-east of Bapaume, made by twelve bombers with fourteen escorting machines, was attacked by thirty or more airplanes. and led to the biggest air fight which the war has yet seen. Some of the enemy pilots attacked soon after the lines were crossed, but most of the eighty 20lb bombs carried by aeroplanes of Nos. 12 and 13 Squadrons were dropped on their objective. As Vraucourt was neared the German attacks were intensified, some fighters getting inside our formation, and over the village itself the fighting became general. The escorting aeroplanes were supplied by Nos. 11, 60 and 29 Squadrons. 

The first casualty was suffered by No.60 Squadron soon after the lines were crossed. Lieutenant A D Bell-Irving, in last of three flights, was wounded in the leg and had his  very lights set on fire and his engine and petrol tank hit, but was able to land near the trenches, where his aeroplane was wrecked. Meanwhile, the reminder of the escorting machines were fighting hard to protect the bombers, but two of these, both from No.12 squadron, were shot down, and pilot of another was wounded but got home. Two of the escorts, both D.H.2s of No.29 squadron, were fought down by several enemy fighters, and were last seen keeping up the flight close to the ground. Lastly, one of the FEs of No.11 Squadron, with dead observer and a wounded pilot, crashed into no-mans land where the pilot escaped into front-line trenches. 

 

 

 

Jasta 2 pilots claimed six British planes in that day, some of them in this fight; couple of B.E.2s from No.12 Squadron by von Richthofen and Kirmaier, couple of Nieuport 17s from No.60 squadron by Otto Hohne and new guy, Lt. H Wortmann, D.H.2 from No.29 by Hans Immelmann and FE8 by Bohme. FE8 was less known pusher fighter serving alongside D.H.2 (and supposedly, the last pusher scout to be withdrawn from service). 

 

600px-Royal_Aircraft_Factory_F.E.8.jpg

 

https://en.wikipedia...t_Factory_F.E.8

 

Two more things of interest that happened between Boelckes' death and 9th November were, Stefan Kirmaier becoming new leader of Jasta 2 and Karl Bodenschatz becoming its adjutant. 

Bodenschatz went to history as *the* German aviation adjutant. A school friend of Boelcke IIRC, he was supposed to become his adjutant in Jasta 2, and arrived on day of Boelckes death - his first duty was to escort the body for burial. Instead of Boelcke, he become adjutant to succession of Jasta 2 leaders, starting with Kirmaier. Then, when JG1 was formed, Manfred von Richthofen got Bodenschatz transferred out of Jasta 2 into his new command. He was serving under Richthoffen there until his death, then stayed under Wilhelm Reinhard, ending the war as adjutant of last JG1 leader, Hermann Goering. When Goering became head of Luftwaffe in 1930s, he reactivated Bodenschatz as his liason to Adolf Hitler. Bedenschatz spent WW2 in this position, and ended his career testifying as witness in Nurenberg.

Bodenschatz was never a pilot; as adjutant his duties were running and supplying the unit on the ground. In JG1, due to supply shortages Germans suffered, he was scouring the countryside armed with Richthoffens photographs, each signed "To my dear comrade in arms" by MvR himself - he traded these with German supply officers to provide JG1 pilots with quality food and drink. After Kirmaiers death, Bodenshatz become acting leader of Jasta 2 as most senior officer even though he was no pilot. I've always found his diminishing procession of commanders - from almost-Boelcke through Richthoffen to Goering - somewhat symbolic of wider German downfall.

His short book, "Hunt under Flanders sky" (don't remember English title, alas), gives a good, slightly outside view of lives of German pilots. Bodenschatz did not participate in air combat, but instead spent lot of time with pilots and was responsible for their well being and accomodation, and for state and maintenance of planes. He had no reasons for self-aggrandizing and gives not first hand accounts of half-remembered fights; instead we have pretty solid descriptions of pilots lives while on the ground, and their reactions to fights they just had from detached but close observant. 

 

Kirmaier spent barely two months in Jasta 2, one month as its leader. By the time he joined his score stood on 3 and best of Boelckes cubs, Manfred von Richthofen, was at 5. By the time of his death his score was at 11 while MvR brought his up to 8. Whether it makes Kirmaier better pilot and MvR more lucky one, or whether MvR was just better at self preservation, is of course debatable. It's worth noticing that in fight 100 years ago MvR and Kirmaier both went for BE2 bombers (which were not only less likely to put up a fight, but also more important targets), while other pilots downed fighters.

 


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#34 J2_SteveF

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 17:47

I love this thread :)
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#35 Zooropa_Fly

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 17:49

It'll soon be the Centenary of the last RoF update !


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#36 GrahamshereGT

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 20:31

It'll soon be the Centenary of the last RoF update !

Still have like 98 years for that. And by that time I'll be almost as old as FogelGT :icon_lol:


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#37 J5_Gamecock

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 23:12

 100 years ago today...

 

   Leutnant  Heinrich Gontermann joined Jasta 5  from FA 25.  During the next six months he would score 17 victories with Jasta 5, 12 of them during Bloody April. In May of 1917 he was awarded the "Blue Max" and was sent to become Staffelfuhrer of Jasta 19.  

Attached File  Heinrich_Gontermann.jpg   34.7KB   0 downloads

 

 

  In the 12 months from Nov. 1916, until his death in Oct. 1917, Gontermann was credited with 39 kills,and was the second highest scoring "Balloon buster" in the German Air Service with 18. He died from an accident while testing a Fokker Dr1, when the upper wing tore away.

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#38 Cybermat47

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 20:26

World War I, Week 120

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"What was the purpose of it all? What's the price of a mile?! Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army on the march! Long way from home, paying the price in young men's lives! Thousands of feet march to the beat, it's an army in despair! Knee-deep in mud, stuck in the trench with no way out!"
- From The Price of a Mile by Sabaton.

#39 J2_Trupobaw

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 13:09

100 years ago, Leutnant Karl Büttner (of Jasta 2 again) was brought down by crew of No.8 Squadron BE2 he was attacking. He was forced to land behind the lines, where he became PoW; his captured machine was first Albatros to fall intact into Entente hands, and gave its captors good insight into types abilities. It also became one of most photographed Albatrosen D.II.

2946L.jpg

 

Captain G A Parker and his observer H E Hervey landed next to the Albatros to capture the pilot. They both received Military Cross for their efforts, and Parker must have been transferred in recognition to the Nieuport-equipped No.60 squadron, unit in which until recently Albert Ball was flying with, because that's what he was flying with when we hear of him next.

Albert Ball, on whose Nieuport exploits I have no info better than Wikipedia, was glossed over in this thread so far - i'd really love more people with knowledge on units other than Jasta B to chime in. 100 years ago, Ball was in England - enjoying his leave, being awarded Military Cross and DSO with three successive bars, and instructing. In few months he will be back in focus, with first S.E.5s. The first S.E.5 prototype was almost ready 100 years ago, perhaps next week it will be ready for test flight... 


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#40 testid

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 18:43

That's interesting that the Allied livery uses the (presumably former) German pilot's name as an identifier. Is there a shot of this plane in the precapture livery?
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