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Halberstadt D.II In Streaked Camoflage


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#1 WWDubya

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 21:18

Halberstadt D.II In Streaked Camouflage - Possibly in Macedonia 1917, Jasta 25 or Halbgeschwader I

Updated May 5, 2013
Get Them from Here.

Source:
Unknown FLIKR photo

RoF Forum member input by:
J2_Wallenberg - Voss' Dr.I-like coloring suggestion
Trooper117 - Caption information suggesting the location as Macedonia, date as 1917, and the possible unit as Jasta 25 or Halbgeschwader I
Feathered_IV - suggests that the belly surfaces may be CDL

Thank you for your input!!!

Added two other possible versions of this same aircraft, so now this offering is a Three-fer!

Click Image for larger version
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This photo is the only reference I have for this specific aircraft. I stumbled upon it while attempting research on other Halberstadt D.IIs. I could find no further information at my normal sources such as "The Aerodrome" and "Wingnut Wings." Therefore I have no pilot, field, unit, or date information.

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However, this aircraft had captured my attention and I submit it here as an historic offering, as the photo appears authentic. My best guess is that this aircraft was used to test a theoretical camoflage technique that was later sent into production with the likes of the Fokker Dr. I. Therefore I have attempted to simulate the application technique that is described in several posts at The Aerodrome.

Do note how well the tip of the rudder blends with the ground cover in the background!

Belly color is pure speculation, though, the color could be anywhere from translucent/CDL, whiteish-blue, to sky-blue. I chose a sky-blue.

If anyone has actual information regarding this specific aircraft, I'd be more than happy to make corrections or add the historic data to the accompanying .TXT file.

Update:: Due to valuable input from the community members listed above, I have added two other possible variations. If you don't like them… it's their fault! :lol:


Sky Blue Belly 1 - Click Image for larger version
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Sky Blue Belly 2 - Click Image for larger version
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Sky Blue Belly 3 - Click Image for larger version
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Sky Blue Belly 4 - Click Image for larger version
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Light Blue Base 1 - Click Image for larger version
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Light Blue Base 2 - Click Image for larger version
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CDL Base 1 - Click Image for larger version
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Enjoy!
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#2 Feathered_IV

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 23:44

That looks exceptional. It wouldn't surprise me if the undersurfaces were natural linen either.
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#3 HotTom

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 23:49

Nice!

Aye!
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#4 Demon_

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 23:56

Yep :D
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#5 WWSandMan

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 03:16

Yes!

That streaked effect looks very similar to the 'streaking' visible on Fokker Dr1's with factory green paint.

Speculation here: Was the streaking was caused by workers using large brushes to paint the linen fabric, and not necessarily any desire to have a cammo effect. I believe the intent was a uniform color covering, but as the paint dried variations showed up depending on the direction of the brush stroke. Also, I believe the linen was pre-painted prior to applying it to the aircraft, then cut to a planned pattern for eventual installation on the aircraft. The linen's color strokes might not line up with any particular vertical or horizontal alignment on the aircraft. But the paint stroke direction would be the same for all the linen pieces cut to the same pattern (much like a pattern a sail maker or clothing maker would use.)
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#6 Trooper117

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 09:36

The caption I have for it from a Russian site is 'Halberstadt, Macedonia, 1917' (So, possibly Jasta 25 or Halbgeschwader I?)

Attached Files


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#7 J2_Wallenberg

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 10:05

If I may add some more speculation - maybe it is olive drab streaked over the skyblue overall scheme? That would perhaps look like Voss' Dr.I (F.I), as his mechanic described it?

It could be anything when only one photograph is the source; but I think the existence of the sky blue standard paint on the Halberstadt D.II and this shot of a streaked pattern as well as the way the F.I Dreidecker prototype was reported to be painted like add up to support my loud thinking.

Great job anyway. Giving you a "yes", but hope to hear your opinion on what I've posted!
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#8 J2_Adam

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 10:13

Makes sense to me Wally.
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#9 WWDubya

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 14:22

Feathered, Trooper, Wally,
Thanks! I'm incorporating the info and suggestions now by updating the .TXT files and I'll add a couple of other "goodies." Stay tuned…

Sandy,
If I'm piecing the info together correctly from The Aerodrome, then here's what the process could have been: a light coat of lacquer over whatever base-coat happened to be on the AC (accounts differ here from light blue over-all to CDL). While still wet, OD pigment (differences in research indicate it could have been a single color, or upwards to three different pigments in earth-tones) in powder form where tossed onto the wet surface and then stroked on in a diagonal direction with a lacquer-wet brush. Brush size didn't seem to matter… (I'd almost suspect straw brooms may have been employed by some enterprising young workers… who knows for 100%-sure?) Uniformity of color was not a concern, but a good by-product was a broken pattern helping to blend the colors into the ground-clutter from a distance. That coat was left to become "tacky," then gone once over again -in the same diagonal direction- with a final coat of clear lacquer to seal the pigment in place and water-proof the canvas.

There are variations of method indicated from other's research, but this is about as clear as I can make it in my own mind.
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#10 fubar2niner

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 14:23

A yes from me, beautiful job mate.

Best regards.

fubar2niner
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#11 navair2

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 16:21

A "yes" from me as well. I like the way you brought out the metal covers on the nose section and the weathered effect on the wood areas. :S!:
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#12 BillyKid

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 16:32

I had been looking for information about Voss's DR1 colors awhile back but never posted it. I have attached a color picture of Cole Palen's Fokker D.VII painted in the colors of Willi Gabriel of Jasta 11. This aircraft when the photo was taken was part of the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. The techniques used to paint this aircraft restoration would have been the same techniques employed by the mechanics in WWI. Gabriel died in 1968 and there is 1st hand information from him how the aircraft was colored. There were also other mechanics with lesser known interviews other than Voss's mechanic who also confirm the colors and technique. Jasta 11 and Jasta 4 shared the same airfields and more than likely the same groundcrews, or at least the groundcrews were able to communicate with each other and were probably pulling from the same supplies.

Attached Files


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#13 J2_Adam

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 17:36

I like the new versions. Good job.
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#14 BillyKid

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 18:37

The caption I have for it from a Russian site is 'Halberstadt, Macedonia, 1917' (So, possibly Jasta 25 or Halbgeschwader I?)



Both those units were equipped with the Hannover built licenced Halberstadt D.II's. Both units are pretty well documented as far as colors and markings. They had typical factory identifications and colors of the Brown/Red for the period.

First off, Dubya did an exceptional job once again. +1 on the vote. Now the cons. The aircraft pictured is not a D.II. It is a D.III. No big deal really since the D.II and D.III were esentially the same aircraft. Most obvious in identification is the 120 hp Argus As.II engine. (you can see the stack just above the top plane), also the struts are of the pointed type, not blunt ended like the D.II had. No identification marks is a good indication that this was a Halberstadt built aircraft. The white outlined Maltese cross suggests it is late 1916 early 1917 production D.III. Rule out the Aviatik built Halberstadts (Austro-Hungarian also with the Maltese cross) The Aviatik built D.III's (approx 70 built) were unique as well in their coloring and markings. The original photo itself is in a collection from H.J. Nowarra (Luftfahrt-Archive, Berlin) and is with a group of photos of Lt. Ernst Freiherr von Althaus Jasta 4, Vaux in late 1916

An interesting figure shows that there were never more than 25 operational Halberstadt D.II's and D.III's combined on front line service at any given time during WWI. Between June and August 1917, The highest compliment of 22 Aircraft of both D.II and D.III were in front line service.

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#15 hq_Jorri

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 19:02

The frontbestand seems to disagree with that?

Nice work on the skin Dubya!
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#16 J2_Wallenberg

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 21:13

[…]While still wet, OD pigment (differences in research indicate it could have been a single color, or upwards to three different pigments in earth-tones) in powder form where tossed onto the wet surface and then stroked on in a diagonal direction with a lacquer-wet brush. Brush size didn't seem to matter… […] Uniformity of color was not a concern, but a good by-product was a broken pattern helping to blend the colors into the ground-clutter from a distance. That coat was left to become "tacky," then gone once over again -in the same diagonal direction- with a final coat of clear lacquer to seal the pigment in place and water-proof the canvas.[…]

Thank you for sharing this, very interesting!

And - amazing job! I offered you my idea based on speculation only, went to work, and now that I've come back it's there already. It sure looks great, and I hope I didn't suggest rubbish.
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#17 Dads1958

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 22:02

A easy yes vote from me. Nice work.
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#18 BillyKid

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 23:39

The frontbestand seems to disagree with that?

My guess, probably not. Here is the front page of the Halberstadt Fighter C&C Vol.11 No.3 issue article by Peter M. Grosz, the same author of the Frontbestand tables. Unless he is contradicting himself, this is the same table on the Halberstadt D class.

Attached Files


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#19 hq_Jorri

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 05:15

I dont get it. In december 16 it shows 72 DII and DIII combined? What am I missing?
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#20 BillyKid

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 05:20

I dont get it. In december 16 it shows 72 DII and DIII combined? What am I missing?

That I am probably retarded, you got me. Although a 76% loss rate between December 1916 and February 1917 would get me back down to my previous comment that there were never more than 25 operational D.II's and D.III's combined still holds true. It all comes down to semantics. I guess I should have stated that the D.II and D.III;s were so shoddy and flimsy that the German air service couldn't keep 25 air born at any given time
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#21 J99-Himmelhund

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 05:53

Yes!
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#22 jeanba4

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 06:36

:x I voted "no" to the unavailability of those skins to the communauty :mrgreen:
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#23 Panthercules

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 20:17

Poll concluded; thread locked.
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