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Need Help Creating Biographies for Belgian Pilots


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#1 Jason_Williams

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 15:48

Guys,

We also need some Biographies for Belgian pilots. I know NOTHING proper about Belgian culture or the types of men and their motivations who would have volunteered for a combat flying job in Belgium during the war. So, I turn to the community to help write some biographies of Belgian pilots. We could use 3 to 5 of them so we can get the Belgian Career started.

Time is super short, so I'll pay $50 per accepted biography for your time and creativity. Deadline is Monday morning or before if I get several in the next couple days. The money well is not infinite. :-)

Please post them here in this thread in english. Also, please refer to the current biographies in the game for examples on how they should look and sound. Don't forget their birthday and place of birth etc.

Any questions let me know.

Thanks in advance!
Jason
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#2 Dressedwings

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 16:25

Belgian Noble(?) from Arras.

"(pilots name) was born in (pilots date of birth) to a moderately rich family. He was the youngest of 7 children born to his parents. (pilots surname) had a strong background with the belgian nobility, as they had been one of the original families to help fight in the Belgian fight for independence He was born in the Arras region of Southern Belgium, where in 1914 when the Germans invaded, had been one of the targets of the invasion (pilots name) had shown and interest in aircraft since 1909, when he saw a wright brothers farman at the annual reims air competition However it wasnt until 1913 until he actually saw an aeroplane up close Ever since (pilots name) was young, he showed an aptitude for horseback riding, which made his father aspire him to be a great cavalry rider

This proved true, and in 1914 when the German invasion had begun, he was in the Belgian Armed Forces as a cavalry officer However, as the months of the war drew on, it became clear to (pilots name) that this war was no place for horse and man to fight together, so in (mid, late, early) 1915 he left the first Belgian cavalry. He headed to one of Frances flight schools to learn the new art of aerial warfare. This was to the immense dismay of his family


He joined the Aviation Militaire Belge in 1916, after learning to fly and maneuver a farman type aircraft and recieving his combat training, which he had shown an excellent aptitude for target shooting, (pilots name) went to (pilots squadron) to serve as a scout pilot with one of belgians supply of Nieuport 17's (or random scout name used by the AVB) The skies over the now destroyed fields of Belgium and France, was where he felt he belonged."

Its pretty basic, so it can be revised to match any squadron/historical innaccuracie I made, but As far as I researched, everything should fit into place. S! And I had fun doing this. Also, to all you who could actually give some critism, that'd be great :D

useful resource: http://www.wwiaviati...ium1916-17.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.wwiaviati...ium1916-17.html
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#3 JFM

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 16:36

There are 375 Belgian aviator biographies in Walter Pieters's The Belgian Air Service in the First World War www.aeronautbooks.com/product/978-1-935881-01-8 so there's plenty of material for people to work with. Looking forward to finally having the Belgians in a flight sim!
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#4 Jason_Williams

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 17:03

I have that book. I didn't realize it had any biographies. I gave it to Luke though. Need to use it as a source. Anyways, offer is still valid. Time is short.

Jason
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#5 Branwell

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 18:00

I have that book. I didn't realize it had any biographies. I gave it to Luke though. Need to use it as a source. Anyways, offer is still valid. Time is short.

Jason

That's an easy $250 for Luke then! :lol:
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#6 Raine

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 18:20

Belgian pilot bio
Farm boy from Attre

[Pilot name] was born in [birth year] on his parents’ sugar beet farm near the village of Attre in the southern Belgian province of Hainault. The youngest of three sons, he knew that he would not inherit his family’s land and set about learning a trade.

[Pilot name] befriended the owner of a garage in the village and spent every spare minute there, learning the mysteries of the internal combustion engine. His hobby soon paid off. The garage owner encouraged [pilot name] to race cyclecars, and he won several local and regional trials. On his sixteenth birthday, having come to a modest degree of fame through his racing, he was offered employment as a mechanic at the sucrerie in Attre. He coworkers nicknamed him le magicien for his ability to quickly get the owner’s broken-down beet trucks back onto the rough farm roads.

As the threat of a European war grew, [pilot name] announced to his shop foreman that he would join the army as a dispatch rider. But the foreman told him to forget that army nonsense and talk to the “big boss,” who was an aviation enthusiast. “You want to be a flyer, boy,” said the foreman. “You’ll get cheap beer every night, the girls will love you, and no sensible man will ever put a heavy gun in a flying machine.” [Pilot name] soon found himself training – at the sugar refinery owner’s expense – at Hendon in England, alongside three dozen fellow Belgians. Returning shortly before the outbreak of war, he completed some familiarization flights in a clumsy Farman HF20. When war erupted in August, [pilot name] was engaged in reconnaissance missions over Liége and Namur.

By April 1915 he learned that his foreman was wrong. Fellow Belgian Fernand Jacquet mounted a Lewis gun in his Farman pusher and quickly downed an Albatros two-seater. [Pilot name] was thrilled. It was time to get serious about repelling the invader.
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#7 JFM

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 19:19

Good news, Jason.

BTW, I drew the profiles for that book. If you guys have any need for the various personal markings for skins, let me know and I can send you psd files, gratis. Save you time to recreate them, if you haven't already, and would look better than scans. Regardless, looking forward to the Aviation Militaire Belge!
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#8 gwaewar

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 19:58

If you make belgian pilot biographies one should be a cartoonist ;) since they have a long tradition in that industry.

;)

Regards
gwaewar
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#9 Dutch2

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 20:32

I'm not good in English so I hope if this is good somebody could do the corrections:

<p> $[name] was born in Turnhout on $[birthdate] and raised up in wealth and respected family, that did own a factory that was specialized in printing bibles.
As a child, $[name] was interested in all things that moved and had a engine and soon he could drive his fathers car and his uncle motorcycle. As a present after succeeded his study on the technical university, his grandfather introduced him to Baron Pierre de Caters the first qualified Belgium pilot. Baron de Craters at that time, did manage the training of military officers on a civilian pilot school. Highly interested in modern techniques and impressed by the planes, he could not refuse the invitation to make a short flight. After this flight he made the discussion that he would be a pilot and arrangements were soon made for flying lessons.

After the declaration of war in 1914, $[name] was presenting him self to the compagnie des Aviateurs. Despite his proven skill in flying he was not selected for flying on the front. Because of his high education and he could speak and write fluent in the France language, arrangements were made to promote him as a officer that was responsible for maintenance of all the Belgium planes and to advice the purchase of the new airplanes types. Managing the maintenance from his desk and do a judgment on planes in a time when Belgium took every plane they could get, was for $[name] frustrating. To make himself useful he requested to be discharged of his desk task and to be assigned to $[me Escadrille] were he was active as a normal pilot. Despite his excellent flying skills, he was a slow starter, but during the whole war this ace did show on what he was capable on.


Jason why not make this open in the carreer mode so you can make your own story.
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If I wrote something in this forum that is hurting or abuse a member, organisation or country? Let me know by pm for the corrections, please do not react back by bashing/trolling/flaming or other personal attacks!

Yep I’m an 2009 Rof pre-order buyer and one of the few that did buy the Sikorsky game.

#10 Hellbender

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:00

I'm sorry to have to speak up about this, but I'm more than a little worried about how much actual historical research is going into the Belgian career. From the threads that have been popping up lately asking for all kinds of advice, I fear pretty much everything is coming from the forums. I'm not against crowdsourcing if it's handled properly. This all just looks so… rushed.

In any case, instead of criticising, I'll be constructive instead. If Walter Pieters' books are not enough information on the subject, I can always give you his e-mail address, I'm sure the man himself can fill in some of the blanks, if there are any left. Maybe he could cross-check the data you already have.

Please don't take this the wrong way, I've just waited a long, long time to see this happen.


P.S. love the bio you wrote, Raine
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J5_Hellbender


#11 Gamedad-be

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:18

This is awesome…But I' ve got a slight feeling there is little known about our people..apart from the political circus of the present day :D

By All means please use Walter Pieter's book for information: it's the bible as far as the aviation Militaire Belge goes..( I'm sure Hellbender will agree)
No need to invent things it is all historical and ready at hand. The man made it his lifetask to educate us about the Belgian aviation during world War I

As far as culture goes : 500+ different kinds of beer, the best chocolates in the world, Brussels sprouts, french fries and mussels, Walter Van Beirendonck, and the first president of the European union ( not quit sure if this is a plus… :? )
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#12 Dr.Zebra

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:21

the belgian motor-enthusiast:

<p>Born as illegetimate child of an industrial baron and his chauffeurs wife at $[birthDate], $[name] spent his early childhood away from his fathers belongings in Vielsalm in the eastern borderregion with distant relatives of his mothers family. </p>
<p> Despite his rural schooling, $[name] proved to be very talented in mathematics and languages and soon developed a keen mechanical interest. Having repaired and improved farming machinery and beeing fluent in the three major languages of the border region, Dutch, German and French $[name] set out to make his own way and fortune. </p>
<p> Working for a motorcyclegarage, he earned the necessary means to enroll in the famed Université de Liège. There, through contacts with wealthy comilitons who valued his mechanical skills, he began to become involved racing.</p>
<p>While first serving as a mechanic in the Grand Prix ardennen races, the reestablished contact to his father and a subsequent generous allowance enabled him to activly participate in motorcycle races across europe. Albeit ultimatly never truely succesful as a motorcycle racer, $[name] made a name for himself in the racing circuit for beeing a good sport, giving mechanical help and sharing his omnipresent pralinés with his competitors without any hesitation.</p>
<p> Through contact with the three Olieslagers brothers in the racing circles he was encouraged to take his own flying lessions. After he had proven to be a suffienctly talented aviator, they even occasionally lent him their Bleriot IX until $[name] was finally able to afford his own plane. Filled with enthusiasm and through another contact from the racing scene, Pierre de Caters, $[name] gained employment in the shortlived first belgian aviation company "Aviators" as a technical advisor and sales representative.</p>
<p> Unemployed at the outbreak of hostilities through the german invasion, $[name] was imiatly drafted into the belgin military and, bringing his own plane, assigned to the aviation school in Étampes for further refinement of his flying skills before beeing comanded to the frontlines, having joined $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
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#13 Gamedad-be

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:24

@JFM

I admire your work! :S!:
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#14 Dr.Zebra

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:30

This is awesome…But I' ve got a slight feeling there is little known about our people..apart from the political circus of the present day :D

By All means please use Walter Pieter's book for information: it's the bible as far as the aviation Militaire Belge goes..( I'm sure Hellbender will agree)
No need to invent things it is all historical and ready at hand. The man made it his lifetask to educate us about the Belgian aviation during world War I

As far as culture goes : 500+ different kinds of beer, the best chocolates in the world, Brussels sprouts, french fries and mussels, Walter Van Beirendonck, and the first president of the European union ( not quit sure if this is a plus… :? )

I only was a guest-worker in Belgium, but I still like to correct you: Jean Rey, like the guy in my bio schooled in Liegé, was only the 2nd president of the European Union ;=)

and yeah: waffles all the way! (meaning behind the cliché: yes, I do love belgium and I am happy to see the career now if only the hanriot…..)
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#15 Branwell

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:38

How's this?



<p> $[name] was born near Tournai in western Belgium, on $[birthdate], where his father was a low-ranking Civil Servant in the Belgian government. As a small boy, $[firstName] enjoyed living in the rural area near the French border, and did relatively well through his early years at school, without being outstanding. His father became well known for being an efficient administrator and shortly after the Belgian government annexed the Congo in 1908, his father saw the chance of a better life and was successful in gaining a posting to the Belgian Conseil Colonial in Boma, and moved his family to West Africa with him.</p>

<p>Daily life was mundane for $[firstName] and the family found it hard to adjust to the lifestyle and weather, which was certainly very different to Belgium! In 1912, however, $[firstName] saw an aircraft for the first time - an old and very flimsy craft that he later found out was a Voisin. It was flown by one of the more eccentric and flamboyant plantation owners to travel to Boma to lobby the Conseil. In May 1914, $[firstName]'s younger sister sadly became unwell with malaria and died. $[firstName]'s father blamed himself entirely for her death and fell into depression, resigning from his job at the Conseil a month later. The family sailed home to Belgium, returning to their family home in Tournai on 26 July 1914.</p>

<p> Merely days later, $[firstName] listened, horrified, to the news that the German Army had crossed the Belgian border. Over the coming weeks news of the huge battle at Liège was listened to intently by $[firstName] and his family, but they hoped that the forts would hold out. When Fort Barchon fell on 10 August it was a hammer blow to the $[lastName] family, along with the rest of Belgium. Day after day, news worsened, and within a week the battle of Liège was over. Within a few more days, Brussels had fallen and despite news in other Allied countries of the resistance of 'plucky little Belgium', the days seemed dark indeed for $[firstName].</p>

<p>$[firstName] had watched, fascinated, the fragile aircraft heading east to reconnoitre the German advance. Along with many citizens of Tournai he cheered the aircraft that he would later know to be Farman and Bleriots with their bold red, yellow and black roundels. The ominous sound of the guns had been clearly heard in Tournai for weeks however, and with Belgium's capital gone, [$firstName]'s father again moved his family, using his contacts forged over his years in minor Governmental roles to provide the necessary paperwork. They moved westwards into France, three days before German forces took Tournai, following what would become known as the First Battle of The Marne.</p>

<p>$[firstName] was by now a young adult, and craved to join the defence of what was left of his homeland. With the loss of his daughter still keen in his mind, his father urged him not to join the infantry, and pleaded $[firstName] to instead try for the Aviation Militaire Belge. Thinking the odds of success were too low as the force was so small, and wanting to join the fight as soon as possible, $[firstName] broke his father's heart once more, and joined an Engineer regiment.</p>

<p>Though his father's contacts and his own intelligence had seen to it that he would rise rapidly through the ranks in the engineers, $[firstName] quickly learned that his father may have been right after all and, after enduring the horrors of industrialised warfare at first hand, spent a short time recuperating in hospital following being wounded by a German shell whilst overseeing the construction of a field storage area. During this time he once more saw the Belgian aircraft heading towards the front and made up his mind to leave the hell of ground warfare forever and become an airman. After rigorous selection and training that could at best be described as rudimentary, $[startRank] $[lastName] found himself reporting for duty at $[squad] on $[startDate], to play his own small part in expelling the invader from his homeland.</p>
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#16 gorillacake

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:43

[Pilot name] was born in [birth year] to a respectable middle class family from Hasselt. As the eldest son of a municpal official with notions of political grandeur, young [pilot name] had a great weight of expectations resting on his shoulders. Discipline in the household was harsh and poor performances in school were discouraged by severe beatings from his stern father. Upon completing his secondary education, there was no question in his father’s mind about the next step his son should take, and so [pilot name] was duly enrolled in the law faculty of the prestigious Université Catholique de Louvain.

Although resentful of the choices forced upon him, [Pilot name] showed a remarkable aptitude for the subject, if not for his studies. He relished the newfound freedom which student life afforded him. While the days were spent with his friends sipping coffee in the cafés of the Grand-Place, most evenings were spent drinking beer and genièvre in the Place du Vieux Marché or at the occasional cantus. It was at one particularly rowdy cantus that he befriended the son of the wealthy Baron d'Anethan and it was from this friendship in particular that [pilot name] came to be introduced to the world of aviation. The pair would often skip lectures and travel to the small aerodrome at Tirlemont, where the young d'Anethan had his own Blériot XI, and where [pilot name] would take occasional lessons. The euphoria of flight made him forget about the petty ambitions foisted upon him by his own meddlesome family.

In the early August of 1914, [pilot name] and his drinking mates were to be found racing along country roads in d'Anethan’s touring car in the French Riviera. Their summer revelry was brought to a crashing halt following the news of the German invasion of Belgium and the chaos and confusion of the following days saw them reach only as far as La Panne before the German army tightened its grip on the rest of the country. While coming to terms with the prospect of being cut off from their families and friends for the foreseeable future, the companions were dealt another devastating blow upon learning of the deliberate and total destruction wrought by the German army on the city of Louvain and of the execution and expulsion of its civilian population. The young men needed no inspiration from King Albert, and they hastily enlisted in the hope of liberating their country. While the others ended up in the infantry, for [pilot name] and d'Anethan, there was no question that their war would be fought in the air.

With a license already to his name, d'Anethan was swiftly posted to a squadron. [Pilot name] however, while having some experience, lacked a license and so was forced to undergo training before joining a squadron, although not alongside d'Anethan. As the battles of 1915 raged on the ground, [pilot name] found himself flying reconnaissance missions in the air and it finally felt like he was playing his part in the war to free the country, and reclaim the life, which had been so viciously stolen from him. His sense of grief and loss, however, was tragically compounded upon learning of the death of d'Anethan in February 1916.

With the arrival of state of the art fighting machines to the front lines, [pilot name] felt that his time had finally come to wreak his own personal form of vengeance against the foe and to liberate Belgium via the wreckage of one burning German aircraft at a time.
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#17 LordNeuro_Srb

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 21:52

My humble tray on carier modifing Fernand Jacquet biography and Raine wery good Belgian pilot bio

[Pilot name] was born in [02 November 1888] Petit Chapelle Region wallonne in the Belgian Province de Namur. The son of a wealthy landowner, he entered the Military Academy in October 1907 while aged 18.He was commissioned on 25 June 1910 and then assigned to the 4ème Régt de Ligne. Despite less than perfect vision, after serving as an infantry officer he received a pilot's brevet on 25 February 1913.

[Pilot name] was spending lot of time on the farm , riding horses and helping in the farm jobs. As a great lover of horses and speed he began to participate in horse racing , and he won several local and regional races. On his sixteenth birthday, having come to a modest degree of fame through his racing, he was offered to take part in the local military parade and horse race in Petit Chapelle. He was fascinated by the military and decided to join wich he did three years later.

As the threat of a European war grew, [pilot name] soon found himself training and preparating alongside three dozen fellow Belgians for war. When war erupted [pilot name] was engaged in reconnaissance missions near Namur, and reported the hazards of the encroaching Germans.When not flying combat missions in a two-seater, he would rove the roads near the front in an automobile with a mounted Lewis machine gun;Additionally, [pilot name] would increasingly 'push the envelope' in his aerial missions, volunteering for "special missions". In the latter category, [pilot name] bombed the Germans at Groote Hemme on 24 November 1914, and again on Christmas Eve at Beerst and Essen. In the former, while brave men brought home the aerial photographs and reconnaissance sightings from the front, [pilot name] penetrated past them to pierce deep into the German defenses, looking for a fight
[pilot name] was duly assigned to 1ere Escadrille in 1915 following the outbreak of war in Europe and Germany's invasion of Belgium. The first of his victories was achieved on 17 April 1915 when he downed an Albatross C aircraft over Rouers, when he was taken under fire by the observer of a German Albatros two-seater at hundred yard range.

[Pilot name] mounted a Lewis gun in his Farman pusher and quickly downed an Albatros two-seater making all pilots thrilled.He flew a Maurice Farman aircraft, in which his first 'kills' were achieved. The ace is born.

:S!:

PS if english is poor sorry it is with help of google transletor. :oops:
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#18 Jason_Williams

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 22:05

I'm sorry to have to speak up about this, but I'm more than a little worried about how much actual historical research is going into the Belgian career. From the threads that have been popping up lately asking for all kinds of advice, I fear pretty much everything is coming from the forums. I'm not against crowdsourcing if it's handled properly. This all just looks so… rushed.

In any case, instead of criticising, I'll be constructive instead. If Walter Pieters' books are not enough information on the subject, I can always give you his e-mail address, I'm sure the man himself can fill in some of the blanks, if there are any left. Maybe he could cross-check the data you already have.

Please don't take this the wrong way, I've just waited a long, long time to see this happen.


P.S. love the bio you wrote, Raine

Bender,

EVERYTHING we ever do is in a hurry. We always have internal and external deadlines we are trying to meet. Absolutely no time to waste. I am in charge of gathering info for some of the Belgian items. Since I know little about the Belgians I ask for help. Better than me trying to guess. We have done this many times with many other subjects. Nothing different.

The info I have asked for is window dressing mainly. Medals, Bios etc. Luke has been researching the squads and the planes etc. for a while which is the real meat of the Career. If we royally screw it up we can fix later, but it will be fine. I'm curious, has any other sim added the Belgians a separate air force in a WWI career? I don't remember if Red Baron did or not.

All we need to do is plug it all into the Career mode module. All nations work the same way.

Jason
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#19 Jason_Williams

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 22:08

Good news, Jason.

BTW, I drew the profiles for that book. If you guys have any need for the various personal markings for skins, let me know and I can send you psd files, gratis. Save you time to recreate them, if you haven't already, and would look better than scans. Regardless, looking forward to the Aviation Militaire Belge!

JFM,

What I need is emblems for the Belgian squadrons like we have for the current squads in the game. Can you help me with that? Send me a PM if you can. This is my most urgent need.

Jason
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#20 gorillacake

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 22:10

Yeah, mea culpa on some of that Bender, the Nederlandse pdf that I posted in the previous thread wasn't all too great bar the pretty pictures.

As for the biographies, I was cringing a little while writing my own. Although I live in Belgium, I am still a foreigner here, and I don't want to do some of your lads from 1914-18 any disservice. I was working on the assumption that student life in Leuven hasn't changed all that much in 100 years…
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#21 Dressedwings

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 00:09

Just to bump my response, I edited my first comment to have the biography.
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#22 DidNotFinish

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:03

Where there's money for a college kid to make…I'll be there.

Young Belgian Man From Antwerp

<p> "In the cold winter of $[birth year], $[full name] was born. $[first name] was raised by his German-speaking parents, Carel and Ida. His childhood was that which any young man would have wanted. $[first name] went to school in his hometown, the historic and fast-growing city of Antwerp. He went to a large school in the city as a boy. His teachers slowly but surely taught him Dutch, a much more commonplace language in Belgium. He made a plethora of friends, and as he grew older became increasingly interested in politics. His father even pulled some strings and several possible futures lit up for $[first name] to choose. By the time he was nearly seventeen years old, $[first name] was interested in becoming a part of the Belgian political machine as the now quite turbulent continent of Europe marched full-steam ahead into the new century. </p>
<p> Alas, $[first name] became very tired of his monotonous life as a would-be politician. As adulthood dawned, he sought after a far more adventurous endeavors. He wanted something more fulfilling. Life, in $[first name]'s young and naive eyes was too short for a paper-pushing job in some government office. The fog of war was soon to blanket his beloved Belgium. Finally, in accordance with Germany's Schlieffen Plan, Belgium was invaded in what the Triple Entente would later refer to as the "Rape of Belgium." It was a horrible time in Belgian history, but rather than surrendering to the general sentiment of defeatism that Belgium was feeling at the time, $[first name] saw a tremendous opportunity. </p>
<p> $[first name], as fate would have it, decided to completely steer away from not only politics, but any career that an logical man would have chosen. He became dead-set on volunteering with the Aviation Militaire Belge, the infant Belgian Air Force. Uninterested in any, well, land-based profession, young $[first name] sought to take to the skies. In what can only be described as the most important moment in his short life, $[first name] volunteered with other able-bodied Belgian men in an attempt to bring the fight to the Germans in the clouds. He was amongst the first Belgian pilots to be trained as most which came before him were, themselves, private pilots. After completing his all-too-short time in a newly-formed training squadron, $[first name] was assigned to $[squadron]. His hands twitched at the thought of downing his first enemy aeroplane. So, with a grin on his face and wings on his uniform, $[full name] flew into the most dangerous and intoxicatingly exciting moments of his life; combat." </p>
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#23 Raine

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:59

I thought I'd try another bio, this one designed for our Dutch and Flemish pilots…

Flemish apprentice from Gent

[Pilot’s full name] was born in [birth year] in Antwerp but spent his early years in the Dutch town of Vlissingen, a short distance down the Scheldt River from Antwerp. His father worked as an engine fitter at the nearby Royal Shelde navy yard. The only boy among four younger sisters, [pilot’s first name] assumed that he would follow his father’s footsteps into the shipbuilding industry. That was not to be. [Pilot’s first name]'s mother died when was only ten, and his father soon after married a Belgian woman from Gent (Ghent). Moving the family to Gent, his father took a job as a engine fitter foreman with Carel Frères, a company that made stationary engines for coal mines. At fourteen, young [pilot’s first name] left school and began an apprenticeship as carpenter and mould maker, also with Carel Frères.

His life took an adventurous turn in the spring of 1913, when Gent hosted a world fair, L’exposition universelle et internationale. Carel had a display in the exhibition’s “Hall of Machines.” Young [pilot’s first name], his apprenticeship now completed, was assigned to set up and maintain the exhibit. At lunch one day, he wandered the exhibition’s grounds and encountered Maurits, a Dutch mechanic who was with a contingent from the British firm of Vickers Ltd. Vickers had many of their latest flying machines on show. “There’s a whole week of aviation events coming up, and they have a French fellow doing a daily air mail flight from Liège from now to October,” Maurits explained.

[Pilot’s first name] was fascinated. He began to spend so much time around the Vickers team and with visiting aviators that his employer, learning of his lack of attention to their steam engine display, fired him. But [Pilot’s name] did not care. He had already spoken with a member of the newly formed compagnie des aviateurs (later to be renamed Aviation Militaire Belge). If he could learn to fly, he was told, they would admit him to the new service.

Soon after, he contrived an introduction to a wealthy Belgian sportsman, M. Carlier, who was a client of Vickers. He cajoled Carlier into giving him flying lessons in exchange for assistance with repairs to his aircraft and properties. Broke, unemployed, and an embarrassment to his serious-minded father, [pilot’s first name] was desperate to succeed as a military aviator. Flying did not come naturally but he went up daily. After managing several solo circuits in a primitive Voisin-Farman, he attempted to solo in Carlier’s Vickers monoplane. The monoplane was difficult to manage and he twice damaged it, working without sleep for days to get it back into the air.

Finally, in June 1914 [pilot’s name] was admitted to the Belgian Aero Club, sponsored by M. Carlier. The next morning, Carlier drove him to the recruiting office. Unfortunately, the army rejected [pilot’s name]’s request to be assigned to flying duties and sent him instead to a railroad company. It was not until September when much of Belgium’s rail system was under enemy control that his plea for transfer to the Compagnie des aviateurswas acted upon.
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#24 Browning

Browning
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Posted 08 March 2013 - 03:03

I'm not good in English so I hope if this is good somebody could do the corrections:

<p> $[name] was born in Turnhout on $[birthdate] and raised up in wealth and respected family, that did own a factory that was specialized in printing bibles.
As a child, $[name] was interested in all things that moved and had a engine and soon he could drive his fathers car and his uncle motorcycle. As a present after succeeded his study on the technical university, his grandfather introduced him to Baron Pierre de Caters the first qualified Belgium pilot. Baron de Craters at that time, did manage the training of military officers on a civilian pilot school. Highly interested in modern techniques and impressed by the planes, he could not refuse the invitation to make a short flight. After this flight he made the discussion that he would be a pilot and arrangements were soon made for flying lessons.

After the declaration of war in 1914, $[name] was presenting him self to the compagnie des Aviateurs. Despite his proven skill in flying he was not selected for flying on the front. Because of his high education and he could speak and write fluent in the France language, arrangements were made to promote him as a officer that was responsible for maintenance of all the Belgium planes and to advice the purchase of the new airplanes types. Managing the maintenance from his desk and do a judgment on planes in a time when Belgium took every plane they could get, was for $[name] frustrating. To make himself useful he requested to be discharged of his desk task and to be assigned to $[me Escadrille] were he was active as a normal pilot. Despite his excellent flying skills, he was a slow starter, but during the whole war this ace did show on what he was capable on.


Jason why not make this open in the carreer mode so you can make your own story.


Corrected English below:

<p> $[name] was born in Turnhout on $[birthdate] and raised in a wealthy and respected family; owners of a factory specializing in the printing of bibles.
As a child, $[name] was interested in all things that moved and before long he could drive both his fathers car and his uncle motorcycle. As a present, after success in his university, his grandfather introduced him to Baron Pierre de Caters; the first qualified Belgium pilot. Baron de Craters, at that time, managed the training of military officers at a civilian pilot school. Very much interested in modern techniques and impressed by the planes, $[name] could not refuse the invitation to make a short flight. After this flight, he made the discussion that he would be a pilot and arrangements were soon made for flying lessons.

Upon the declaration of war in 1914, $[name] presented him self to the "Compagnie des Aviateurs". Despite his proven skill in flying, he was not selected for flying on the front.
Because of his technical expertise and his ability to speak and write fluently in French, arrangements were made to commission him as an officer, responsible for the purchase and maintenance Belgian planes. Managing the maintenance of planes and making decisions about the procurement of new planes in a time of great shortage was, for $[name], frustrating. Desiring a more practical role, $[name] requested to be discharged from his position and to be assigned to $[me Escadrille]. The transfer was approved and $[name] was assigned as a pilot in $[me Escadrille]. Despite some natural ability, he was a slow starter, however he would soon be able to prove himself.

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#25 Jason_Williams

Jason_Williams
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Posted 08 March 2013 - 03:07

Great job guys!

I have enough entries now.

Great job. Between these and the book we will have plenty! I will alert you if I choose one of yours to insert into the game.

Thanks again!

Jason
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