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Building your own joystick/flight panel? Check this out...


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#41 hq_Overmax

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 15:23

The wiring of the switches depends what type you use and what you'd like them to do. I will cover this when I do my wiring if it will help you chaps.
That would be great, thanks. I'll let you encounter all difficulties first. :D Keep us updated.
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#42 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 20:19

Very interesting read, something I have been wanting to look at for a while, of course mentioned to the wife about a cockpit (Dual purpose for car and aviation) and that met with a stony silence. :lol:

Silence mean assent as it is catergorically not a no.

Generally speaking my advice is to by the BU0836X version, its much simpler. I have the non X version in one of my earlier consoles and the wiring and messing about with diodes is a pain and it soon becomes a mass of confusing wires which makes fault finding tricky(and im a former Avionics technian fully trained in wiring and such!).

The X version solves those problems, though it is nearly 3 times the price.
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#43 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 21:04

Some more tips. Please note these are aimed at those with little or no knowlegde of these things , hence to an experienced person or electrician they may seem really simple!

Another tip for using Leo Bodnars cards. The blurb says it has 32 buttons, 8 axes and 1 hat switch. Well with a slightly cunning bit of wiring you can use the hat switch to provide a further four buttons, giving 36 in total. Essentially all the hat switch is is four buttons, but the controller records interactions between them. Basically when two are pushed together it gives one of the angle outputs (take an old joystick apart and you will see what i mean).

To use them as switches I ensure that they cannot be operated at the same time to avoid erroneous errors. The simple way to do this is to use them on a 4 (or more) position rotary switch. As such only one can be depressed at any time.

The game still sees it as a Hat swicths (either 0,90,180 or 270) but I have yet to find one that won't allow you to assign it to a functions.


One more BU0836 tip: In Windows controllers the switches are marked 1-32 plus the hat. However there are some games which assign them as 0-31 and this can cause confusion. In one (I think its RoF) it assigns the first as 0 and wont let me assign it to a control for some reason.

Another tip: Remember, your controller can have switches which themselves don't operate the BU0836 themselves but operate interactions within your own setup. Whay the hell am I talking about? Some examples:

I have an undercarraige lever and this was built with IL2 and FSX in mind and it asctually has two functions and uses 4 buttons. By some cunning wiring to extra switches this lever acts either as a standard UC up/down controller (using two buttons) or can act as a manual 'pump' handle. By flicking two switches (not connected directly to the card), one to change the function of the lever and the other to select up or down. I then move the lever up and down repeatedly to actuate the UC 'pump'.

ANother way you can use extra switches: I have a separate weapons controller. It channels three different controller 'buttons' through a single actual button via a rotary switch. This basically means I have a single switch which fires the weapons (bombs and rockets), BUT only one can be fired at a time and I have to select the correct one! Often I have gone in fo a perfect bombing pass only to find the controller is set on rockets!

ANother idea is to have several physical switches share a single controller button assignment, but only one operates at a time (and this is selected by a further button). I do this so I can use my controller for different games. For instance in FSX I have no need for weapons so by flicking a few switches I can operation different buttons but channeled through the same controller button assignment. My RoF rig makes extensive use of this.

You can of course have two physical switches connected to a single button assignment without a selector. My advice would be to use normally open switches for these operations (such as push buttons). I for instance will do this for the gunsight controls in CloD by having a controller for the bombsight, and a second one just for the gunsights (they share the same controls in game).



Trouble with toggles:

One issue which is a perrenial problem is that of using a switch that has two settings (generally on-off) and stays in one at a time. These are known as toggle switches and come in a variety of styles. However for reasons that will become obvioius I will call these 'flip switches' for the rest of the post. Just to give you an idea this is what I mean byt a toggle (flip switch):

http://www.rapidonli...-switches/30255" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.rapidonli...om/Electronic-C … ches/30255

As you can see it is ON or Off. I have 16 of these exact switches and at least 20 of other variants. One problem which pretty much all of these games have for panel builders is that so many controls are 'toggle' switches designed for traditional keyboard or joystick buttons or keys. The game itself calls them toggle (you see this a lot in CloD) In other words you press the button: action happens and you then release the button but nothing happens, with a few minor exceptions such as brakes and the like.

So, you have assigned a flip switch to turn on your lights. You flip the switch up, the lights come on. You flip the switch down….. lights stay on. To turn the lights off you have to flip the switch up again… in other words its not realistic.

There is a way around this, but in CloD and RoF it isn't perfect: A lot of these switches are what are called 'double throw' switches. What this means is that there is a common contact, usually in the centre and two outer contacts which correspond to both of the positions of the switch. Basically if the switch has 3 (or 6) contactsit is double throw.

What you can do is this: wire BOTH outer contacts to each other (with a further switch inline,but more on that shortly) and then send just two cables to the controller: one for the common contact and the other from the cross connected outer contacts. What this does is operate the controll when the switch is flipped in either direction! But… theres always a but…

This gives rise to two problems: First, sometime in your virtual cockpit the switch you wish to operate will be in the down position, but your physical switch will be in the up direction! And when you flip your switch the mismatch remains but opposite! If you are a bit of a neat freak about this sort of thing it can be quite irritating!

The second issue depends upon the program. Thankfully neither CloD or RoF has the following issue but some games do. With this double wiring system the computer sees the switch as being ON permanently, however I have had problems where when you enter the controll assignment screen it immediatley assigns this ON control to whatever you are messing with. Please note: this is also an issue with rotary switches which use a common centre wire.

The easiest way around this is to introduce a futher switch (hidden at the back of your controller if necessary) which disables the common wire thus turning off the switch. I have 14 of these additional switches, out of a total of 36 on one controller! I actually have these for FSX, as with FSX is you use an additional program called FSUIPC you can assign a fucntion to occur when a switch is flipped off. For instance: switch flipped on: Lights on command, Switch flipped off: lights off command.

This is actually fantastic for pit builders and that alone makes FSUPIC worth its money. I really wish this functionality could be applied to other games, however I appreciate the pit builder is genrally quite low down the priority list for Developers, hence the workarounds.

Blimey.. I only meant to add a few tip and wrote a 45 minute lecture! I cannot be bothered to check my spelling so if it offends you…. meh!
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#44 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 22:34

Hey Flashman

Maybe not 100 percent realistic to a real plane I'll be using momentary toggles which overcome all your listed issues, still look/feel as good and in some cases (depending on switch) will provide 2 functions each.

Interesting about the pots but thankfully I'll only be flying Clod and ROF (thanks for this info).

I'll put up some simple pictures to help the chaps with there wiring as most will only want a small amount of features to use with ROF.

An very interesting read and informative to me but no doubt what you've written will go over most peoples heads. I think knowing how to connect the 3 wires of a pot/slider or the 2/3 terminals of a switch to the PCB is all most chaps will want to know for now.

Finally Leo is selling conectors for the BU0836 now which makes it just as easy to use for 12 functions as the BU0836X as long as you use momentary switches. They are infact the same conectors used for servos in R/C.

Cheers
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#45 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 14:46

Right few pics:

Ooooo its turned green :|

Image

Tidy layout

Image

Extremely untidy wiring (quick put the lid on)

Image

Ah that's better (there could be a nice circuit board in there and you'd never know) :mrgreen:

Image

I will do a basic switch and pot tutorial in the next couple of days.

A few things though:

1. Don't use these little red switches they are damn weak. I changed 3 during the build alone.

2. If you want to use loads of buttons like this use the X version of the controller or your wiring will end up a mess like mine because there is no common earth. I tried chaining the grounds but it made me dizzy so I ended up with the birds nest seen above. If you only want a few buttons the basic controller is fine and it's great for the axis stuff when you use the 3 pin servo style connectors. Rotary's are much easier to fit (no slots to cut) and are slightly more accurate than faders (they don't wobble).

3. Try to use momentary switches/buttons or if you insist on using 2 way toggles you're better off with a pulse board. I removed 2 of my 2 way toggles because even with the link mod Flashman discussed they proved too unreliable without a centre position. Maybe not an issue with the larger style switches.

4. Use a bigger box for this many functions, this was TIGHT. :!:

Only thing I have left to do is change the elevator fader because it's a bit scratchy and add some labels. I might change the little red buttons if they continue to prove unreliable. I could say I will make efforts to tidy the wiring but I know deep down since it all works I'll never get round to it…

Cheers
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#46 hq_Overmax

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 17:18

Wow nice little button box! Looks magnificent… from the outside, nobody cares about the inside as long as it works right? :D

I'm especially interested in flip switches but they seem to be hard to make.
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#47 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 17:27

If you main interest is flip switches you'd be better off with one of these chap:

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=WU1e-UuUSyw" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">

http://www.desktopav..._2120/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.desktopav...r.com/Products/ … /index.htm

You may find this useful too:

http://www.youtube.c...player_embedded" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;"> … r_embedded
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#48 SYN_Flashman

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  • Posts: 539

Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:41

Haven't seen those toggle switch generators before, Im gonna have a look at those!

As Honeymonster mentions sometimes my version of the switch (by wiring both connectors together) doesn't always work smoothly. I use phsyically large switches for this and so long as you move the switch slowly they generally work. I haven't tried it using the small toggle switch HM uses on his panel but can see these could cause problems. Essentially the issue will be the length of time the switch is OFF whilst you move the switch, too short and the computer wont see the difference.
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#49 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:51

Right few pics:

Ooooo its turned green :|

Image

Tidy layout

Image

Extremely untidy wiring (quick put the lid on)

Image

Ah that's better (there could be a nice circuit board in there and you'd never know) :mrgreen:

Image

I will do a basic switch and pot tutorial in the next couple of days.

A few things though:

1. Don't use these little red switches they are damn weak. I changed 3 during the build alone.

2. If you want to use loads of buttons like this use the X version of the controller or your wiring will end up a mess like mine because there is no common earth. I tried chaining the grounds but it made me dizzy so I ended up with the birds nest seen above. If you only want a few buttons the basic controller is fine and it's great for the axis stuff when you use the 3 pin servo style connectors. Rotary's are much easier to fit (no slots to cut) and are slightly more accurate than faders (they don't wobble).

3. Try to use momentary switches/buttons or if you insist on using 2 way toggles you're better off with a pulse board. I removed 2 of my 2 way toggles because even with the link mod Flashman discussed they proved too unreliable without a centre position. Maybe not an issue with the larger style switches.

4. Use a bigger box for this many functions, this was TIGHT. :!:

Only thing I have left to do is change the elevator fader because it's a bit scratchy and add some labels. I might change the little red buttons if they continue to prove unreliable. I could say I will make efforts to tidy the wiring but I know deep down since it all works I'll never get round to it…

Cheers


Nice post. I will add some of my experiences making similar things if you don't mind! I will use the same numbers as Honeymonster.

1. Are these the very small momentary pushbuttons? I bought a lot and have only used one for this reason! They are flimsy

2. I absolutley agree on this one. The X version of the BU0836 might cost quite a bit more but I personally cannot stress enough how much it is worth it, especially if you are not electrically trained or minded (like I am, and I still wouldn't use the original version again, once was enough!). Unfortunately its often one of those things people only learn through doing……as I did.

3. This is a potential problem. I use physically large buttons so that might be the difference. It often depends upon the program and if it recognises the short time the switch is OFF between throws. RoF aint so 'good' on this. I always have a separate switch to break the link between the two outer contacts so this 'feature' can be turned off.

4. I agree. The other option (which I use on the Flashman console Mk3) is to have a separate box to house you BU0836. This has a number of advantages. (i) It means adding additional controllers/buttons is easier (ii) you can have more space to work and wire, it also makes finding faults easier. The disadvatgaes are that you need more wire, you end up with two (or more…13 in my case!) boxes linked together and this depends entirely on your set up how this might work.
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#50 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 09:40

1. Are these the very small momentary pushbuttons? I bought a lot and have only used one for this reason! They are flimsy

They were the cheapest type (aluminium) and indeed garbage. I have since ordered some high quality bulgin steel ones which are the same size and look the same. They are usually £3 each but I got them bulk at a good price. When will I learn you get what you pay for…

2. I absolutley agree on this one. The X version of the BU0836 might cost quite a bit more but I personally cannot stress enough how much it is worth it, especially if you are not electrically trained or minded (like I am, and I still wouldn't use the original version again, once was enough!). Unfortunately its often one of those things people only learn through doing……as I did.

I am going to make a little board to overcome this problem. See attached. I will probably use matrix board, cost about £3.00 and will make life 10x easier.

3. This is a potential problem. I use physically large buttons so that might be the difference. It often depends upon the program and if it recognises the short time the switch is OFF between throws. RoF aint so 'good' on this. I always have a separate switch to break the link between the two outer contacts so this 'feature' can be turned off.

Yes very bad with the little switches there is almost no off time at all. I quite like the momentary toggles though, it means you can adjust flaps and stuff in increments (up and down) from a single switch.

4. I agree. The other option (which I use on the Flashman console Mk3) is to have a separate box to house you BU0836. This has a number of advantages. (i) It means adding additional controllers/buttons is easier (ii) you can have more space to work and wire, it also makes finding faults easier. The disadvatgaes are that you need more wire, you end up with two (or more…13 in my case!) boxes linked together and this depends entirely on your set up how this might work.

Sure this would of been easier! But I wanted somthing small that would sit on my desk for gaming and then be thrown in the monster vault (wardrobe) when it's not being used. Space is a premium for me otherwise I'd have already ordered an R-360 :mrgreen:

I will do you a little tutorial soon chaps I promise I'm just getting started on Cundalls now so I will use his for the switch, fader and pot pictures.

Cheers

Ben

Attached Files


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#51 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 11:16

I made a matrix board using diodes for my original console (it now lives inside my Console Mk2) and its relatively cheap, if time consuming, way to utilise all the controls on your BU0836. I would recommend using terminal blocks soldered to your strip board to connect the switch wires to the controller, rather than connecting the wires directly to the board. It adds a bit to the cost ( a few quid) but does help a lot and makes life a little easier.
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#52 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 11:31

A good idea but there is no way I have space for such things. Besides I like soldering and have a hefty rework station which makes things like this a doddle. I may not even get a matrix board in there. I'll see when it comes down. I've ordered a few pieces to mount Toms fancy Joystick.

Anyway it works perfectly I really shouldn't be taking it appart shoud I… :mrgreen:
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#53 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 13:52

Hmm rework station….. I presume you mean a decent soldering station thingy

I have a cheap and crappy soldering iron from Maplin which doesn't get hot enough really for close accurate work, in fact my soldering is quite shocking (especially as I was trained to solder…) using my kit. yeah yeah… poor workman - tools etc…. I know!

Might indulge myself and get a station when I start work on the Flashman Console Mk 4 in the autumn.
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#54 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 14:35

I have this cheapy all in one fellow at home:

http://www.circuitsp...6000-p-173.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.circuitsp...lists.eu/blackj … p-173.html

I only use the hot air for heat shrink and removing the odd big conection as at work I have a proper Infrared rework station.

The desoldering gun is a magical little thing.
With the amount of panels and cool things you've been constructing you should at least treat yourself to a nice little temperature controlled soldering station. :)

http://www.circuitsp...2000-p-208.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.circuitsp...lists.eu/blackj … p-208.html
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#55 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 14:48

£200….cheap? My soldering iron cost me about £8 from Maplins, didnt even come with a rest thingy! But yeah, I think a better iron will be purchased before I start my next mammoth controller construction scheme
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#56 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 15:19

Something for Mr. Cundall :mrgreen:

Image

Not completely finished yet still the wiring to do. I will do it in steps for the interested chaps.

A unique ROF controller. :D
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#57 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 15:23

Looks great! Can't wait. :)
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#58 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 11:37

Thiiissss isssss hoooow weee doooo it da dadadadada dada da…….

Potentiometers

This is the back of a 10k potentiometer used for the zoom (big knob) on Toms control panel.

Image

First tin your cable with some solder

Image

Then use a tool such as some soldering tweezers to stop the heat damaging your potentiometer while you tin it's terminals.

Image

Then simply apply your iron to the two parts and watch them magically join together. :mrgreen:

Image

For those of you using servo style conectors the middle pin of your conector must be the middle pin of your pot (in this case red). The outer two cables can be either way. This will just invert the axis which can be changed by turning the conector 180 degrees.

Image

Once the pin is soldered I like to add a piece of heatshrink to tidy things up

Image

Do all three pins like this

Image
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#59 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:08

If you didn't buy the cables with conectors you will have to do the same procedure with the conectors supplied with usb controller as shown below.

Image

Image

Image

Image

There are 8 inputs for potentiometers on the BU0836. If you plug this pot into the controller as shown. Then plug in your USB cable, your potentiometer is ready to use and will show up straight away ready for asignment in your game of choice.

Sliding Potentiometers next…
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#60 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:35

Sliders work on the same principle as the rotary pot. In the case of the one pictured number 2 is the equivalent of the centre pin (known as the wiper). Pins 1 and 3 are the outer two terminals. Notice there are two number 2 terminals, you can use either they are both the same (joint together).

The procedure is the same as with the rotary pot.

Image

Image

Image

Image

The conection side for the controller is exactly the same as the rotary.
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#61 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:41

Toms thumb joystick is just two rotarys and a button as can be seen below

Image

That's all for today folks….

I will do buttons, switches and finally an LED next time.

Please discuss/moan/whatever and ask any questions you may have. :mrgreen:

Cheers
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#62 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 16:33

WOW. This looks amazing. (All completely over my head though!)
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#63 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 17:10

Tis simple Mr. Cundall I promise. :mrgreen:

Anyway I thought I'd just add the joystick bit incase anyone was interested before we do the buttons and switches.


Pots soldered

Image

Joystick soldered to matrix board

Image

Image

Bit of hot glue for added security (yes I got a new glue gun…)

Image

Joystick craned into position and all potentiometer wiring is complete.
Check out the messy wiring, they say a good dentist has bad teeth. ;)

Image
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#64 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 23:20

Hmm due to the lack of comments and questions I assume you don't want to see how to do buttons and switches? :?:

:D

The posty is on his way with Mr. Cundall's controller now so let me know if you guys wanna see more.
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#65 catchov

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 01:21

You're very handy Honey :) Take that as a comment please, nothing else ;)

Cundall is a lucky chap.

I WANT ONE TOO :evil:
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#66 O_Ghost

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 01:41

I'm interested in the purpose of the diodes.

Quick question - if I were to use a 3 way switch (on off on) for the level autopilot left and right control, would this work? Or would I have to do something else? I'm happy with momentary switches for everything else.

Thanks!
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#67 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 07:53

I'm interested in the purpose of the diodes.

Quick question - if I were to use a 3 way switch (on off on) for the level autopilot left and right control, would this work? Or would I have to do something else? I'm happy with momentary switches for everything else.

Thanks!

Hey John

A 3 way switch works great for the Auto pilot turn I've just tried it. Also you can get 3 way momentary toggle switches too. This is the type that always returns to the centre when you let go. I've used these for most things on the CLOD controller. Either will work great for the Autopilot turn. With the momentary you will have to hold it left or right, with the non-momentary you will have to return it to centre when you're happy with your direction. I have used a 3 way for Toms engine start so I'll be covering this a bit later.

The diodes are required to stop conflicts if you want more than 12 buttons/switches with the BU0836. Tom only has 11 including the push down joystick but I've added these to give him the option of 18 so we can easily add a few extras at a later date. For the tutorial I will only be showing how to add 12 as this is far less confusing. For most people I suggest going for the BU0836X if you want more than 12 buttons. If people want to see the 32 button option with the BU0836 I will try to explain but it can become a bit of a head scratcher.


I WANT ONE TOO :evil:

Well get your tools out then Catchy and join in the fun. :D

Cheers
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#68 O_Ghost

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:06

Cheers Honeymonster :)

I want to set Left and Right for bombers as they take an age to turn, but I guess I could parallel a momentary as well.

I have ordered the 836X so no need for diodes. I would love to have led's to show that a switch is activated but can't think of a way to make it work (I'm an electrician by trade, but electronics is not on my skills list!)
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#69 SYN_Flashman

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:30

Cheers Honeymonster :)

I want to set Left and Right for bombers as they take an age to turn, but I guess I could parallel a momentary as well.

I have ordered the 836X so no need for diodes. I would love to have led's to show that a switch is activated but can't think of a way to make it work (I'm an electrician by trade, but electronics is not on my skills list!)


Hi John,

If I recall correctly the BU0836X works by providing +5V fo each control which is then routed to the GND via your switch. If you simply wire an LED in series with your switch it should light up (though only whilst the switch is ON).

Also note, the GND is common for all switches, so one GND can act for any switch (which is useful for multi position rotary switches)
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#70 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:32

OK John

If you want to add LED's use a double pole switch. The controllers have spare 5v outputs for powering such things. You will need to run a resistor in series to lower the voltage for the LED. It depends on the voltage of the LED you use, I used a 220R for Toms power LED as you will see later. Does the attached diagram make sense to you?

Cheers

Attached Files

  • Attached File  led.jpg   31.27KB   566 downloads

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#71 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:38

You may be able to do what Flashy sais but I haven't tried it. You will still need a resistor or you'll fry the LED. I've kept mine seperate to avoid the signal voltage/current being effected.

Cheers
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#72 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 11:26

OOoooookaaaay

Buttons

To connect up to 12 buttons to the BU0836 is very simple indeed. They will all share a ground, no diodes or other bits required just buttons and cable.

When soldering buttons especially ones made of plastic it is once again good practice to use a clamp or tweezers to stop the heat from the iron melting your button.

Image

The soldering procedure is the same as always. Tin your cable, tin your terminal and then fuse them together. Always keep your soldering iron tip nice and clean.

Image

Then if you like you can add heat shrink to tidy things up.

Image

Chain a terminal from each button to the next until all your buttons are connected to each other by one terminal (less than 12).

Image

Finally connect the cable to any ground pin on the BU0836 with one of it's provided solder on connectors or a servo syle lead if you bought some. So you have just connected one pin on all the buttons to the controller ground. You can use any of the ground pins I have circled in orange. If you have already used all these for potentiometers it is fine just to double up on one of the pins.

Image
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#73 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 11:47

Finally connect the remaining terminal from each button to one of the twelve pins circled in this image, once again with the included solder yourself terminals or the servo style connectors if you bought them.
That's one terminal to one pin, each pin is represents one of the twelve buttons.

Image

That's it for buttons. These will now appear in your windows joystick test screen and are ready to be used in game. :mrgreen:

Next Switches
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#74 hq_Honeymonster

hq_Honeymonster
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Posted 07 June 2011 - 11:51

This may or may not make it a bit clearer for some of you.

Image
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#75 hq_Peter_Zvan

hq_Peter_Zvan
  • Posts: 543

Posted 07 June 2011 - 11:58

Thank you for the posts and info - makes it much more easy for someone thinking about making his own gear.
The question I have is could a hallsensor be connected to it and how would the responce times be -> I have been a bit dissapointed by all the gear I bought and would like to make my own pedals / stick, but at the same time would want to have top sensors for the positions with fast and linear responce.
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#76 hq_Honeymonster

hq_Honeymonster
  • Posts: 621

Posted 07 June 2011 - 12:02

Thank you for the posts and info - makes it much more easy for someone thinking about making his own gear.
The question I have is could a hallsensor be connected to it and how would the responce times be -> I have been a bit dissapointed by all the gear I bought and would like to make my own pedals / stick, but at the same time would want to have top sensors for the positions with fast and linear responce.

Leo does an Ultra precision controller Peter, scroll down the page for a hall sensor and connection diagram.

http://www.leobodnar...oducts/BU0836A/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.leobodnar...oducts/BU0836A/

Cheers

Edit that's 4096 steps I haven't tried it but send Leo an email and ask him. I'm sure he'll be happy to help and let us know what he sais. :)
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#77 O_Ghost

O_Ghost
  • Posts: 113

Posted 07 June 2011 - 12:38

Big vote for mr Bodnar - I ordered my 836X last week and it arrived today. In Japan. Very impressive!!

Is there any way to use transistors (or something) to latch the LED on or off? I reckon I would need a separate power supply for the LED's then something to detect 5V from the switch which will lock the LED on or off. I may straying into the realms of PLC's I fear…

As I said, electronics is not my forte but I'll have a bash at anything! At least EVERYTHING I would need is available from a multitude of shops a short walk away.
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#78 hq_Peter_Zvan

hq_Peter_Zvan
  • Posts: 543

Posted 07 June 2011 - 12:42

Thanks for that link - looks great - with all the needed stuff listed at the bottom.

I will have a hard think of how I want the mechanics to be like (the biggest complaint I have is non adjustable force, throw and spring center position + weak mechanical construction) and than see if I want to have a go.
The problem is that my simpeds are slowly breaking appart and saitek pedals are just mechanicly so poor that they have lots of friction, as for the sticks its the lack of adjustabillity and overal feel of them.
Thought the Warthog would be something awesome, but its not really won me over - I especially dislike the added weigth of the grip.
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#79 Tom-Cundall

Tom-Cundall
  • Posts: 5549

Posted 07 June 2011 - 12:47

Peter you and Ben (Honeymonster) should go into business making these! You'd clean up- use your contacts in China to manufacture them en-masse! :)
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#80 hq_Honeymonster

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 12:57

Allllllrighty then……

Switches

Switches use the same inputs as the buttons. If you stick to the 12 inputs on BU8036 or use a BU8036X no diodes or similar faffing about is needed.

Most switches (single pole) have two or three terminals. When the switch is to the left it connects the middle to the right terminal. When the switch is to the right it connects the middle to the left terminal. This makes the middle terminal our ground/common. In the case of the 12 button setup just chain the middle terminal to one of the button terminals we linked together or directly to a spare ground terminal.

There's no room for a clamp on these switches so be quick and don't let it get too hot. This is a double pole switch which basically means two individual switches side by side sharing the same lever. We will only using one pole so a single pole switch would be fine.

Image

This switch has 3 positions ON OFF ON. We will be using both ON positions on Toms panel so each will need its own pin on the controller, that is it will use up one button position when left and one when right. This makes this switch the same as two individual buttons.

Image

The reason for this is that I fitted the switch for engine start. When Tom switches the lever left it will start the left engine, when he switches it right it will start the right engine and then it can be left in the centre position.

The problem with switches of the non momentary type (ones that stay in the position you put them in) is that you have to switch them off, then on again to turn things off in most games such as ROF. You can overcome this by joining the two outer terminals together on some switches (it doesn't work on these small ones) as it will switch OFF briefly then ON again when you move the lever. IMO you're better off putting up with the double switching or using momentary switches if it bothers you. With a 3 position ON OFF ON switch you can return it to the centre OFF position so it really is no bother.

I'm a big fan of the momentary ON OFF ON switches as you get the benefit of two buttons with a nice period feel. You also get none of the associated hassle of toggle switches. They are also great for moving things like flaps up and down in increments.

Whether you use a momentary or a toggle switch the wiring is the same so that's switches covered.
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