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96th Bombardment Squadron (USA) Squadron History


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#1 Han

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 17:52

Hello friends. Please assist in writing ENGLISH text of history of the squadron which will be available to player in the first release of the New Career.
It should contains more than 2500 symbols (no upper limit), and it should describe WHOLE history of the squadron - from fundation till it's history end (amy be even till modern days, like for USAF 94th Aero Squadron for example).
Any additional facts and remarks are appreciated.

So please discuss and post your texts here for 96th Bombardment Squadron US squadron

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#2 Jax_on

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 08:05

http://www.facebook....108142352551687" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.facebook....pages/96th-Aero … 2352551687
The 96th Bomb Squadron (96 BS) is part of the 2d Bomb Wing at Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. It operates B-52 Stratofortress aircraft providing strategic bombing capability.

History
The 96th Aero Squadron was America's first bomber group and was formed at Kelly Field, Texas. Originally consisting of 80 men, largely college graduates or college dropouts, volunteers all, and something of an elite group, since their aeronautical qualifications were the highest in the U.S. Army Air Service. Just before embarking upon its first aerial warfare, the squadron decided upon its insignia, a black triangle outlined by a white strip enclosing the profile of a red devil thumbing his nose at the ground with his right hand. In his left, he held a white bomb. This distinctive emblem was designed by the squadron's talented graphic artist, Harry O. Lawson.

The 96th saw combat as part of the 1st Day Bombardment Group, supporting the French Eighth and U.S. First Army from, 12 June 1918 – 4 November 1918. It operated French-made Breguet 14 planes and was involved in an embarrassing fiasco when the entire squadron landed around Koblenz, Germany by accident, providing all of their planes intact to the Germans. Nonetheless, it was the most heavily engaged and most successful USAS bomber squadron. Between the two World Wars it flew Mexican border patrol from, August 1919-10 January 1920, participated in demonstrations of the effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships from, June–September 1921, and on 5 September 1923, and took part in good-will flights to South America between 1938 and 1939.
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#3 Jax_on

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 08:17

http://www.usaww1.co...ment_Group.php4" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.usaww1.co...ment_Group.php4
the 96th Aero Squadron - a day bombardment squadron organized around 10 Breguet 14B2 bombers. The unit was established in the Toul sector on May 18th at the Amanty aerodrome. Amanty was a sleepy little hamlet - population 50, 150 miles east of Paris.

Rather than strike at infantry, the Breguets were tasked at interdiction type objectives - primarily railway centers initially - such as the double and quad track towns of Conflans , Audun-le-Roman, Longuyon and Dommary-Baroncourt. The Germans had been mining the Briey iron mines east of Metz and then transporting the badly needed iron via these four German occupied French towns before entering into Germany proper. This area was very rich in iron and had been responsible for almost two-thirds of French iron output in the years prior to the war. Sec-ondary objectives were other railroads, munitions depots, command posts and any place German soldiers could unload from the railways. With this in mind, the 96th also had Mars-La-Tour, Vignuelles and Thiaucourt on its target list. All were clustered within a 30 mile radius.


The 96th's first attack was a six Breguet raid against the railway yards at Dommary-Baroncourt - a village located in between Thionville, Metz and Verdun - on June 12. The six planes dropped a ton of bombs across the rail yards, hitting the railway lines and a warehouse. This ton per raid average would be maintained during the month of Au-gust when formations of 10 Breguets, on average, dropped a total of 21.1 tons of bombs during 14 flying days and a total of 20 missions.


On July 10 a flight of six Breguet 14B.2 bombers from the 96th Day Bombardment Squadron bombers got lost and landed near Coblenz, Germany, falling neatly into German hands without firing a shot.

Billy Mitchell wrote about about this incident:

"Our bombardment group was not in good condition… was poorly commanded, the morale was weak, and it would take some time to get on its feet. This was largely due to the fact that when I was away, the 96th Squadron was left behind in the Toul area. The officer who was then in command of the 96th flew over into Germany with what ships he had available for duty. He lost his way in the fog and landed in Germany with every ship intact. Not one single plane was burned or destroyed, and the Germans captured the whole outfit complete. This was the most glaring exhibition of worthlessness we had had on the front. The Germans sent back a humorous message which was dropped at one of our airdromes. It said, ИWe thank you for the fine airplanes and equipment which you have sent us, but what shall we do with the major [Harry K. Brown]?"
I know of no other performance in any air force in the war that was as reprehensible as this. Needless to say, we did not reply about the major, as he was better off in Germany…"

In all fairness, the mistake might have been somewhat understandable. The weather had turned to rain about an hour after the flight took off, bringing the clouds down to 100 meters (330 feet) and shutting down visibility. The planes were short on fuel and thus had to land.

There was only one other Breguet operational for the rest of July which the 96th duly used for bombing practice. 11 more Breguets arrived on August 1st which allowed operations to continue as they had before. The squadron flew for 14 days during August - probably the number of days the weather allowed bombing operations. And during that time they dropped 21.1 tons of bombs during 20 bombing raids. The German airfield and the railway station at Conflans were favorite targets in spite of its heavy anti-aircraft defenses. Following rivers made for good navigation and easier orientation. The village was located at the junction of the Moselle and Madon rivers which made it relatively easy to find. The 96th hit Conflans with a total of 15,000 kilograms of bombs over the course of the war - meaning that 96th's efforts against just this 2.5 square mile village of 2,500 people accounted for one quarter of all bombs dropped by all four Day Bombardment squadrons against all targets during the entire war. During one raid on August 20th against Conflans, the 96th destroyed 40 German aircraft while they were still in railway boxcars and also killed fifty workmen and soldiers.

In spite of this had been the most successful of the bomber squadrons to date and it was the only US bomber squadron operating in combat for four months before other bomber squadrons started to go into action. It was the 96th that wrote the book on American bomber tactics and operational procedures.
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#4 Jax_on

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 08:44

http://www.2ndbombgr...96thHistory.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.2ndbombgr...96thHistory.pdf
complete history
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#5 Han

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 08:47

Oh, that is cool finding! Thank you.

Thread is completed, unsticking.

But. I've used tects from your first two findings. If you want to compile 7000-10000 symbols texts from your last link on PDF - it will be even more cool. (For now, this text is too long to implement).

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#6 Jax_on

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 17:49

—-
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#7 Jax_on

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 22:49

the 96th Aero Squadron - a day bombardment squadron organized around 10 Breguet 14B2 bombers. The unit was established in the Toul sector on May 18th at the Amanty aerodrome. Amanty was a sleepy little hamlet - population 50, 150 miles east of Paris.

Rather than strike at infantry, the Breguets were tasked at interdiction type objectives - primarily railway centers initially - such as the double and quad track towns of Conflans , Audun-le-Roman, Longuyon and Dommary-Baroncourt. The Germans had been mining the Briey iron mines east of Metz and then transporting the badly needed iron via these four German occupied French towns before entering into Germany proper. This area was very rich in iron and had been responsible for almost two-thirds of French iron output in the years prior to the war. Sec-ondary objectives were other railroads, munitions depots, command posts and any place German soldiers could unload from the railways. With this in mind, the 96th also had Mars-La-Tour, Vignuelles and Thiaucourt on its target list. All were clustered within a 30 mile radius.


The 96th's first attack was a six Breguet raid against the railway yards at Dommary-Baroncourt - a village located in between Thionville, Metz and Verdun - on June 12. The six planes dropped a ton of bombs across the rail yards, hitting the railway lines and a warehouse. This ton per raid average would be maintained during the month of Au-gust when formations of 10 Breguets, on average, dropped a total of 21.1 tons of bombs during 14 flying days and a total of 20 missions.


On July 10 a flight of six Breguet 14B.2 bombers from the 96th Day Bombardment Squadron bombers got lost and landed near Coblenz, Germany, falling neatly into German hands without firing a shot.

Billy Mitchell wrote about about this incident:

"Our bombardment group was not in good condition… was poorly commanded, the morale was weak, and it would take some time to get on its feet. This was largely due to the fact that when I was away, the 96th Squadron was left behind in the Toul area. The officer who was then in command of the 96th flew over into Germany with what ships he had available for duty. He lost his way in the fog and landed in Germany with every ship intact. Not one single plane was burned or destroyed, and the Germans captured the whole outfit complete. This was the most glaring exhibition of worthlessness we had had on the front. The Germans sent back a humorous message which was dropped at one of our airdromes. It said, ИWe thank you for the fine airplanes and equipment which you have sent us, but what shall we do with the major [Harry K. Brown]?"
I know of no other performance in any air force in the war that was as reprehensible as this. Needless to say, we did not reply about the major, as he was better off in Germany…"

In all fairness, the mistake might have been somewhat understandable. The weather had turned to rain about an hour after the flight took off, bringing the clouds down to 100 meters (330 feet) and shutting down visibility. The planes were short on fuel and thus had to land.

There was only one other Breguet operational for the rest of July which the 96th duly used for bombing practice. 11 more Breguets arrived on August 1st which allowed operations to continue as they had before. The squadron flew for 14 days during August - probably the number of days the weather allowed bombing operations. And during that time they dropped 21.1 tons of bombs during 20 bombing raids. The German airfield and the railway station at Conflans were favorite targets in spite of its heavy anti-aircraft defenses. Following rivers made for good navigation and easier orientation. The village was located at the junction of the Moselle and Madon rivers which made it relatively easy to find. The 96th hit Conflans with a total of 15,000 kilograms of bombs over the course of the war - meaning that 96th's efforts against just this 2.5 square mile village of 2,500 people accounted for one quarter of all bombs dropped by all four Day Bombardment squadrons against all targets during the entire war. During one raid on August 20th against Conflans, the 96th destroyed 40 German aircraft while they were still in railway boxcars and also killed fifty workmen and soldiers.

October 18th is a record date in the annuls of the Squadron. A formation of 14 planes reaching its objective, Sivry, with all its planes, and trailed bombs through the center of the town and to the roads beyond. 1600 kilos of bombs were dropped. According to intelligence reports from French sources, 250 men were killed, and 700 wounded on this raid. Fifteen Fokkers and Pfaltz scout planes were encountered, but their attack was not well organized.

In spite of this had been the most successful of the bomber squadrons to date and it was the only US bomber squadron operating in combat for four months before other bomber squadrons started to go into action. It was the 96th that wrote the book on American bomber tactics and operational procedures.

Between the two World Wars it flew Mexican border patrol from, August 1919-10 January 1920, participated in demonstrations of the effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships from, June–September 1921, and on 5 September 1923, and took part in good-will flights to South America between 1938 and 1939.

During the Second World War the 96th flew antisubmarine patrols from, 8 December 1941-c. 28 October 1942 before flying combat missions in the European Theater of Operations and the Mediterranean Theater of Operations from, 28 April 1943-1 May 1945. It performed occupational duty in Europe from, June 1945-June 1946.

The 96th conducted strategic bombardment training from, 1 July 1947-1 April 1963. In September 1996, deployed and launched attacks against military targets in Iraq. It earned the 1996 Mackay Trophy for the 33-hour long mission from Louisiana to Iraq and back as the most meritorious flight of the year. Since 1993 it has conducted combat operations to support worldwide conventional and nuclear taskings and provided long-range, heavy strike, initial response, and sustained firepower in support of all regional and global warfighting commanders.
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#8 Han

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 23:45

Great work, corrections implemented!
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#9 LukeFF

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:45

If you don't mind, some further corrections needed to be made: :)

The 96th Aero Squadron was a day bombardment squadron initially organized around 10 Breguet 14B.2 bombers. The unit was established in the Toul sector on 18 May 1918 at Amanty aerodrome. Amanty was a sleepy little hamlet of 50 people, located 150 miles east of Paris.

Rather than strike at infantry, the Breguets were tasked with interdiction type objectives - primarily railway centres initially - such as the double and quad track towns of Conflans , Audun-le-Roman, Longuyon and Dommary-Baroncourt. The Germans had been mining the Briey iron mines east of Metz and then transporting the badly needed iron via these four German-occupied French towns before entering into Germany proper. This area was very rich in iron and had been responsible for almost two-thirds of French iron output in the years prior to the war. Secondary objectives were other railroads, munitions depots, command posts and any place German soldiers could unload from the railways. With this in mind, the 96th also had Mars-La-Tour, Vignuelles and Thiaucourt on its target list. All were clustered within a 30-mile radius.

The 96th's first attack was a six-Breguet raid against the railway yards at Dommary-Baroncourt - a village located in between Thionville, Metz and Verdun - on June 12. The six planes dropped one ton of bombs across the rail yards, hitting the railway lines and a warehouse. This ton-per-raid average would be maintained during the month of August when formations of 10 Breguets, on average, dropped a total of 21.1 tons of bombs during 14 flying days and a total of 20 missions.

On July 10, a flight of six Breguet 14B.2 bombers from the 96th Day Bombardment Squadron became lost and thus landed near Koblenz, Germany, falling neatly into German hands without firing a shot. Billy Mitchell would later write about this incident:

“Our bombardment group was not in good condition… was poorly commanded, the morale was weak, and it would take some time to get on its feet. This was largely due to the fact that when I was away, the 96th Squadron was left behind in the Toul area. The officer who was then in command of the 96th flew over into Germany with what ships he had available for duty. He lost his way in the fog and landed in Germany with every ship intact. Not one single plane was burned or destroyed, and the Germans captured the whole outfit complete. This was the most glaring exhibition of worthlessness we had had on the front. The Germans sent back a humorous message which was dropped at one of our airdromes. It said, ИWe thank you for the fine airplanes and equipment which you have sent us, but what shall we do with the major [Harry K. Brown]?"

I know of no other performance in any air force in the war that was as reprehensible as this. Needless to say, we did not reply about the major, as he was better off in Germany…"

In all fairness, the mistake might have been somewhat understandable. The weather had turned to rain about an hour after the flight took off, bringing the clouds down to 100 meters (330 feet) and near-zero visibility. The planes were short on fuel and thus had little choice in where to land.

There was only one other Breguet operational for the rest of July, which the 96th duly used for bombing practice. Eleven more Breguets arrived on August 1st, which allowed operations to continue as they had before. The squadron flew for 14 days during August - probably the number of days the weather allowed bombing operations. Moreover, during that time they dropped 21.1 tons of bombs during 20 bombing raids. The German airfield and the railway station at Conflans were favourite targets in spite of its heavy anti-aircraft defences. Following the rivers made for good navigation and easier orientation, as the village was located at the junction of the Moselle and Madon rivers, which made it relatively easy to find. The 96th hit Conflans with a total of 15,000 kilograms of bombs over the course of the war - meaning that 96th's efforts against just this 2.5 square mile village of 2,500 people accounted for one quarter of all bombs dropped by all four Day Bombardment squadrons against all targets during the entire war. During one raid on August 20th against Conflans, the 96th destroyed 40 German aircraft while they were still in their railway boxcars and killed fifty workers and soldiers.

October 18th is a record date in the annals of the Squadron. A formation of 14 planes reached its objective, Sivry, with all its planes, and trailed bombs through the centre of the town and to the roads beyond. 1600 kilograms of bombs were dropped. According to intelligence reports from French sources, 250 men were killed, and 700 wounded on this raid. Fifteen Fokker and Pfalz scout planes were encountered, but their attack was not well organized.

In spite of its setbacks, the 96th had been the most successful of the bomber squadrons to date, and it was the only US bomber squadron in combat for four months before other bomber squadrons started to go into action. It was the 96th that wrote the book on American bomber tactics and operational procedures.

Between the two World Wars, it flew Mexican border patrol missions from August 1919 to 10 January 1920; it participated in demonstrations of the effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships from, June–September 1921 and on 5 September 1923; and it took part in goodwill flights to South America between 1938 and 1939.

During the Second World War, the 96th flew antisubmarine patrols from 8 December 1941-c. 28 October 1942 before flying combat missions in the European Theatre of Operations and the Mediterranean Theatre of Operations from 28 April 1943-1 May 1945. It performed occupational duty in Europe from June 1945-June 1946.

The 96th conducted strategic bombardment training from 1 July 1947-1 April 1963. In September 1996, it deployed and launched attacks against military targets in Iraq. It earned the 1996 Mackay Trophy for the 33-hour long mission from Louisiana to Iraq and back as the most meritorious flight of the year. Since 1993, it has conducted combat operations to support worldwide conventional and nuclear taskings and provided long-range, heavy strike, initial response, and sustained firepower in support of all regional and global war-fighting commanders.

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