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SPA.103 (FRA) Squadron History


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#1 Han

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 17:41

Hello friends. Please assist in writing ENGLISH text of history of the squadron which will be available to player in the first release of the New Career.
It should contains more than 2500 symbols (no upper limit), and it should describe WHOLE history of the squadron - from fundation till it's history end (amy be even till modern days, like for USAF 94th Aero Squadron for example).
Any additional facts and remarks are appreciated.

So please discuss and post your texts here for SPA.103 French squadron

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#2 Jax_on

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 10:04

N103 had evolved from a bombing unit, being first mobilised on 2 August 1914 as Br17, equipped with Breguet bombers. Re-equipped with Voisin 3s in November and assigned to Groupe de Bombardment 1. the squadron was redesignated VB3 on 5 January 1915, and again as VB103 on 25 May. Nancy Malzeville which is the main base of the unit is used throughout the western front. The unit bombed airfields, railways, factories, performing missions to more than 200 kilometers from the front as the bombing of chemical plants of Luidwischaffen.The unit acquitted itself well in the bombing role, but on 19 February 1916 it was moved to Cachy, re-equipped with Nieuports and assigned to Brocard's Groupement de Combat de la Somme as N 103.
The squadron's first victory was scored on 3 August by its commander Capitain Jean d'Harcourct.


The success of the temporarily grouped escadrilles de chase in both Verdun and Somme campaigns led to a French decision to form permanent groupes de combat, and one of the first units so designated was GC12, on 16 October 1916. Commanded by Brocard, who was ptomoted to the temporary rank of Chef de Bataillon, GC12 comprised the already famous N3, N26, N73 and N103 lead by Capitane Jean d’Harcourt. The group officially commenced operations from Cachy aerodrome on 1 November 1916.


By 1 November 1916 N103 had five German aircraft to its credit, for the loss of six pilots and one bombardier killed in accidents.

In April 1917, Paul Rene Fonck (was the Allies' most successful fighter pilot of World War One, and also the highest-scoring survivor of the war) was assigned to Spa103.

In april 1917 GC12 was officially given the appelation ИGroupe des Cigones’, and N3’s Alsacian symbol was adopted for all four of its fighter escadrilles. The establishment of a common group insignia meant that those already being used by the other squadrons, such as N103’s red star, would be replaced by stork in different attitudes of flight. N103 retained the red Roman numerals by which its individual aircraft were identified, and many of its aircraft had its old emblem – the red star – applied to the upper right wing.

In April 1917 the N 103 completely equipped with Spad and change their name to SPA 103. This will be final name of the unit. Since then squadron scored many great victories.

In this squadron Fonck met the end of the war with his seventy five official victories, the biggest number of wins among all Allied Pilots. Haegelen, Coudouret, and many other great pilots had flown along with Fonk in this squadron till the end of the war. The 103 has lost 11 pilots, but has 108 confirmed victories, 69 probable and 3 Drachen.
____________________________________________________________________________________
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#3 Jax_on

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 10:27

Sources - Osprey publishing
and http://escadron1.2ci...e.fr/spa103.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://escadron1.2ci...e.fr/spa103.php (again on french, there is detailed history of the fate of the squadron after the First World War, but again, need a translation from French)
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#4 Han

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 16:26

Osprey publishing - emmm… I'm not sure that it's ok about copyright… :(

May be someone can re-phrase this text?

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#5 Jax_on

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 16:46

I also used text from Osprey in article for esc3. I marked in black text from osprey in this thread and in esc 3 thread. Unfortunately I did not possessing adequate knowledge of English and I can not paraphrase the text :(
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#6 Han

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 23:01

Ok, let's take this for a while.
If someone will re-phrase this text - it will be cool.

Thread completed, unstickied.

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#7 KAPEH

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 09:53

My edition of Jax_on's masterpiece:

Unit was formed in August 2nd, 1914 in Dijon Longvic as bombing escadrille Br.17 and had been equipped with Breguet airplanes. From January 1915, under the command of Captain Henoist, later Captain Boucher, escadrille participated in operations with Bomber Group No. 1. Equipped with Voisins it took the name of V.B. 3 and later, in March 1915 - V.B. 103.

It was Nancy Malzeville which became the main base of the unit. The escadrille used to bomb airfields, railway stations, factories, sometimes reaching targets that was situated more than 200 kilometers from the frontline such as, for instance, chemical plants at Luidwischaffen. The squadron successfully coped with their responsibilities.

In the morning of July 1st, 1916 British Army began an offensive on the River Somme. To support the offensive and resist the German Luftstreitkräfte Entente needed more fighter units. On February 19th,1916, according to the new plans, unit was reorganized, and moved to Cachy. Re-equipped with Nieuports it was assigned to Groupement de Combat de la Somme as N 103.

August 3rd commander of the N103 Captain Jean d'Harcourct achieved first squadron's victory.

Air battles over Verdun and the Somme demonstrated the efficiency of the grouping squadrons together. French command decided to create a permanent groupes de combat. First groupe de combat GC12 was established on November 1st, 1916 under the command of Brocard. It includes N3, N26, N73 and N103 Squadrons.

By November 1st, 1916 escadrille N 103 had scored five German aircraft to its credit, for the loss of six pilots and one bombardier killed in accidents.

The symbol of N 103 Squadron was a red star. But when in April 1917 the GC12 became officially named "Groupe des Cigones" (in recognition merit of the N3) – symbols of the squadrons N 26, N 73 and N 103 had been replaced by Flying Stork. Each escadrille customized the emblem. N 103 Flying Stork may be described as “soaring stork” with its wings spread slightly above body. Though, many pilots of 103’s remained loyal to the old emblem and their aircrafts was decorated with a stork on the fuselage and a red star on the wing.

In April 1917, N 103 had been completely equipped with SPADs and changed its name to SPA 103. This will be final name of the unit. Since then squadron scored many great victories.

At the same period Paul Rene Fonck (who became the Allie's most successful fighter pilot of World War One, and also the highest-scoring survivor of the war) was assigned to SPA 103 (N 103).

In this squadron Fonck met the end of the war with his seventy five official victories, the biggest number of wins among all Allied Pilots. Haegelen, Coudouret, and many other great pilots had flown along with Fonk in this squadron till the end of the war. The SPA 103 had lost 11 pilots, but has 108 confirmed victories, 69 probable and 3 baloons.

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#8 LukeFF

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 10:32

KAPEH, I went ahead and cleaned up the spelling and grammar a bit of your text:

Spa103 was formed on August 2nd, 1914 in Dijon Longvic as bombing escadrille Br.17 and was equipped with Breguet airplanes. From January 1915, under the command of Captain Henoist, (and later Captain Boucher), the escadrille participated in operations with Bomber Group No. 1. Equipped with Voisins it took the name of V.B. 3 and later, in March 1915, V.B. 103.

It was Nancy Malzeville that became the main base of the unit. The escadrille bombed airfields, railway stations, and factories; at times, they bombed targets that were situated more than 200 kilometres from the frontline such as, for instance, the chemical plants at Luidwischaffen. The squadron successfully carried out their responsibilities.

On the morning of July 1st, 1916, the British Army began an offensive on the River Somme. To support this offensive and oppose the German Luftstreitkräfte, the Entente had recognized the need for more fighter units. On February 19th, 1916, according to new plans, the unit was reorganized and moved to Cachy. Having been re-equipped with Nieuports, it was assigned to Groupement de Combat de la Somme as N103.

On August 3rd, the commander of N103, Captain Jean d'Harcourct, achieved the squadron’s first victory.

Air battles over Verdun and the Somme demonstrated the efficiency of grouping squadrons together. The French command decided to create permanent Иgroupes de combat’ (Combat Groups). The first groupe de combat, GC12, was established on November 1st, 1916 under the command of Brocard. Its squadrons included N3, N26, N73 and N103.

By November 1st, 1916, Escadrille N103 had shot down five German aircraft to its credit, for the loss of six pilots and one bombardier killed in accidents.

The symbol of N103 Squadron was a red star. However, when in April 1917 GC12 officially became ИGroupe des Cigones’ (in recognition of the merit of N3), the symbols of the squadrons N26, N73 and N103 were replaced by the Flying Stork. Each escadrille customized the emblem. N103’s Flying Stork may be described as a Иsoaring stork’ with its wings spread slightly above its body. Many pilots of N103 remained loyal to the old emblem and their aircraft were decorated with a stork on the fuselage and a red star on the wing.

By April 1917, N103 had been completely reequipped with SPADs and thus had its name changed to Spa103. This became the final name of the unit. After that time, the squadron continued to score many great victories.

During the same period, Paul René Fonck (who became the most successful Allied fighter pilot of World War 1 and the highest-scoring survivor of the war) was assigned to Spa103 (N103).

It was with this squadron that Fonck ended the war with seventy-five official victories, the largest number of wins among all Allied pilots. Claude Haegelen, Louis Coudouret, and many other great pilots had flown with Fonck in this squadron until the end of the war. By war’s end, Spa103 had lost 11 pilots but also had 108 confirmed victories, along with 69 probable victories and 3 balloons.

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#9 KAPEH

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 11:50

Thx, Luke! Now it looks much more English…those articles and perfect times are mine bigest problem in English….understand them too complicated task for Russian speaker:)
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#10 Han

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Posted 01 March 2011 - 21:55

Great, thank you guys!
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#11 LukeFF

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 08:50

No problem, glad to help. :)
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#12 LukeFF

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 08:56

I made some small corrections to the text:

Spa103 was formed on August 2nd, 1914 in Dijon Longvic as bombing escadrille Br.17 and was equipped with Breguet airplanes. From January 1915, under the command of Captain Henoist, (and later Captain Boucher), the escadrille participated in operations with Bomber Group No. 1. Equipped with Voisins, it took the name of V.B. 3 and later, in March 1915, that of V.B. 103.

It was Nancy Malzeville that became the main base of the unit. The escadrille bombed airfields, railway stations, and factories; at times, they bombed targets that were situated more than 200 kilometres from the frontline such as, for instance, the chemical plants at Luidwischaffen. The squadron successfully carried out their responsibilities.

On the morning of July 1st, 1916, the British Army began an offensive on the River Somme. To support this offensive and oppose the German Luftstreitkräfte, the Entente had recognized the need for more fighter units. On February 19th, 1916, according to new plans, the unit was reorganized and moved to Cachy. Having been re-equipped with Nieuports, it was assigned to Groupement de Combat de la Somme as N103.

On August 3rd, the commander of N103, Captain Jean d'Harcourct, achieved the squadron’s first victory.

Air battles over Verdun and the Somme demonstrated the efficiency of grouping squadrons together. The French command decided to create permanent Иgroupes de combat’ (Combat Groups). The first groupe de combat, GC12, was established on November 1st, 1916 under the command of Brocard. Its squadrons included N3, N26, N73 and N103.

By November 1st, 1916, Escadrille N103 had shot down five German aircraft to its credit, for the loss of six pilots and one bombardier killed in accidents.

The symbol of N103 Squadron was a red star. However, when in April 1917 GC12 officially became ИGroupe des Cigones’ (in recognition of the merit of N3), the symbols of the squadrons N26, N73 and N103 were replaced by the Flying Stork. Each escadrille customized the emblem. N103’s Flying Stork may be described as a Иsoaring stork’ with its wings spread slightly above its body. Many pilots of N103 remained loyal to the old emblem and their aircraft were decorated with a stork on the fuselage and a red star on the wing.

By April 1917, N103 had been completely reequipped with SPADs and thus had its name changed to Spa103. This became the final name of the unit. After that time, the squadron continued to score many great victories.

During the same period, Paul René Fonck (who became the most successful Allied fighter pilot of World War 1 and the highest-scoring survivor of the war) was assigned to Spa103 (N103).

It was with Spa103 that Fonck ended the war with seventy-five official victories, the largest number of wins among all Allied pilots. Claude Haegelen, Louis Coudouret, and many other great pilots had flown with Fonck in this squadron until the end of the war. By war’s end, Spa103 had lost 11 pilots but also had scored 108 confirmed victories, along with 69 probable victories and 3 balloons.

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#13 Han

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 23:58

Cool! Thank you!
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#14 bluesideup

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 22:59

For exhaustive reference see a book by Norman Franks and Frank Bailey: The Storks. The Story of France's Elite Fighter Groupe de Combat 12 (Les Cigognes) in WWI. Published by
Grub Street,
The Basement,
10 Chivalry Road,
London SW11 1HT.
ISBN 1-898697-81-7 British Library
The book includes the day to day operation of the Storks from their initial formation to the end of the war. the details are superlative and include all the names, biographies, transfers, locations, victories and losses, number of machines available, number of missions for almost any specific days, awards and medals given, even the kind of weather involved.
http://www.amazon.co...00834635&sr=8-1" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.amazon.co...ORKS-Frances-Fi … 635&sr=8-1
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