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Esc.124 (FRA) Squadron History


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#1 Han

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 17:40

Hello friends. Please assist in writing ENGLISH text of history of the squadron which will be available to player in the first release of the New Career.
It should contains more than 2500 symbols (no upper limit), and it should describe WHOLE history of the squadron - from fundation till it's history end (amy be even till modern days, like for USAF 94th Aero Squadron for example).
Any additional facts and remarks are appreciated.

So please discuss and post your texts here for Esc.124 French squadron

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#2 WWBrian

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 12:43

From – http://en.wikipedia....ette_Escadrille" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://en.wikipedia....ette_Escadrille

Escadrille 124
"Lafayette Escadrille"

The Lafayette Escadrille (from the French Escadrille de Lafayette), was a squadron of the French Air Service, the Aéronautique militaire, and was composed largely of American volunteer pilots flying single-seat scouts.

The squadron was formed in April 1916; a year before America declared war on Germany, as the Escadrille américaine (N. 124) in Luxeuil . Thirty-eight volunteer American aviators served in the squadron. They were known as “The Valiant 38”. Additionally, there were also five French officers.

Two lion cubs, named "Whiskey" and "Soda", were made squadron mascots.

Dr. Edmund L. Gros, director of the American Ambulance Service, and Norman Prince, an American expatriate already flying for France, led the efforts to persuade the French government of the value of a volunteer American air unit fighting for France. The aim was to have their efforts recognized by the American public and thus, it was hoped, the resulting publicity would rouse interest in abandoning neutrality and joining the fight. Not all American pilots were in this squadron; other American pilots fought for France as part of the Lafayette Flying Corps.

The squadron was quickly moved to Bar-le-Duc, closer to the front. A German objection filed with the U.S. government, over the actions of a supposed neutral nation, led to the name change in December. The original name implied that the U.S. was allied to France when it was in fact neutral.

Their fighter aircraft, mechanics, and the uniforms were French, as was the commander, Captain Georges Thenault. Five French pilots were also on the roster, serving at various times. Raoul Lufbery, a French-born American citizen, became the squadron's first, and ultimately their highest scoring flying ace with 16 confirmed victories before his squadron was transferred to the US Air Services.

The first major action seen by the squadron was at the Battle of Verdun, being posted to the front in May 1916 until September 1916, when the unit moved to 7 Army area at Luxeuil. The squadron, flying the Nieuport scout, suffered heavy losses, but its core group of 38 was rapidly replenished by other Americans arriving from overseas. So many Americans volunteered that the Lafayette Flying Corps was formed; with many Americans thereafter serving with other French air units. Altogether, 265 American volunteers served in the Corps. Although not formally part of the Lafayette Escadrille, other Americans such as Michigan's Fred Zinn, who was a pioneer of aerial photography, fought as part of the French Foreign Legion and later the French Aéronautique militaire.

On 8 February 1918, the squadron was transferred to the US Army Air Service as the 103rd Aero Squadron. For a brief period it retained its French aircraft and mechanics. Most of its veteran members were set to work training newly-arrived American pilots.

The 103d claimed a further 49 kills up until November 1918.

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#3 Han

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 17:21

Great! Thanks for finding.

Completed, thread unstickied.

Any additional details may be added / corrected.

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#4 Han

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 17:32

Also, this aquad have nbo post WW1 history?
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#5 WWBrian

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 20:12

Also, this aquad have nbo post WW1 history?

from – http://en.wikipedia....d_Aero_Squadron" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://en.wikipedia....d_Aero_Squadron

…they became absorbed into the 103rd Pursuit; and ultimatly became part of the 94th Aero in 1924.

Finally on the 18th of Feb. 1918, the officers of the old Lafayette Escadrille were assigned, and the CO. 1Lt Park was replaced by Maj. Thaw, and combat operations commenced under Combat Group 21, Fourth Army (France). from La Noblette the squadron was shipped north to flanders, where it spent the remainder of the war at various airfields following the line of advance.

On 29-July-1918 Maj. Thaw was promoted to Ltc and took over 3d Pursuit Group, and capt. Rockwell was made Co. after the war the squadron was shipped home from the port of Brest on the 19-Feb-1919.


…then you start getting into the history of different squadrons. I'm not sure the "context" of these histories and how they will be used, so I didn't want to confuse the user with multiple squadrons.

So this is the relevant history specific to Esc. N.124. Just let me know if you would like more added.
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#6 LukeFF

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 23:15

Maybe it's just me, but I find all this direct copying and pasting from Wikipedia to be, umm…a bit lazy.
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#7 WWBrian

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 01:37

Maybe it's just me, but I find all this direct copying and pasting from Wikipedia to be, umm…a bit lazy.

ROFL - so if I change one or two words,delete a few, then it's original enough?

Have you read your own Jasta 35 and compared it to wiki? :lol: :lol: :lol:


Composed from

http://www.theaerodr...com/services/ge" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.theaerodr...com/services/ge … asta35.php
http://www.theaerodr...2290-post3.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.theaerodr...2290-post3.html
http://en.wikipedia..../Jagdstaffel_35" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://en.wikipedia..../Jagdstaffel_35

Jagdstaffel 35 was a Bavarian fighter squadron formed at the Flieger Ersatz Abteilung 6 training center in Großenhain on December 14, 1916. It mobilized on January 7, 1917 and was in action by the 1st of March, 1917. Its first victory, scored on the 14th of April, 1917, occurred on the same day it lost its first Staffelführer. After the death in action of second subsequent commanding officer, subsequent commanders were brought in from outside the unit. This included Ludwig Hanstein from Jasta 16 and both Otto Fuchs and Rudolf Stark from Jasta 77.

Jasta 35’s initial operations were in support of the Armee-Abteilung B Sector, where it operated until July 1917. It subsequently was transferred to support 4th Armee, during which time it was a part of Otto Schmidt's Jagdgeschwader II (along with Jasta 7, Jasta 29, and Jasta 33). The unit would support 4th Armee until December 1917.

In March 1918, in support of 17th Armee, Jasta 35 became a part of Eduard Ritter von Schleich's Jagdgruppe 8, joining Jasta 23, Jasta 32, and Jasta 59. It would remain in this role until September 1918. With Jasta 59 transferring out of JG 8 and Jasta 34 taking its place, the new Royal Bavarian Jagdgeschwader IV was established. Jasta 35 thus ended the war with this new unit.

At the beginning of its operations, the unit was equipped with the Albatros DIII. It is assumed the unit later was equipped with at least on D.V, as Staffelführer Hanstein was flying one when he was killed. The unit upgraded to Fokker D.VIIs, Pfalz D.XIIs, and Roland D.Vas in 1918.

By war’s end, Jasta 35 had scored 42 victories at a cost of 6 killed in action, 4 killed in flying accidents, 9 wounded in action, 4 injured in flying accidents, and 2 taken as prisoners of war. Three notable aces, including the aforementioned Ludwig Hanstein (awarded the Iron Cross) and Otto Fuchs (awarded the Royal House Order of Hohenzollern), and Fritz Anders (awarded the Iron Cross), served with the unit. The squadron was disbanded ten days after the war’s end on November 21, 1918, at Flieger Ersatz Abteilung 1 at Schleissheim, Austria.

As always…you are free to add/change anything you'd like.

These posts of mine, not unlike game development, are meant as a beta ( or even an alpha) version, to get the ball rolling….

If you wish to polish it up, by all means - delete a word, grab your thesarus and change one…whatever.

But don't call me lazy for steping up when nobody else was!
(there were 60-some-odd views of the thread, and not a single response!)
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#8 LukeFF

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 02:42

My point is that it would have been very easy for the devs themselves to look up all these units on Wikipedia and do what you did. ;) Obviously, though, they want more than that.

And yes, while I myself relied on Wikipedia, I did not copy them verbatim but also worked in some sources from theaerodrome.com website.
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#9 Richy133

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 14:07

Also, this aquad have no post WW1 history?

Lafayette Squadron still exists in French Air Force, it now flies with Mirage 2000N.
I found this pdf document in english, maybe it will help you:
http://www.guerrelec.asso.fr/archives/lettre13uk.pdf


When the 103rd Aero Squadron was created, the french pilots remaining in the N124 became the new SPA 124 "Jeanne d'Arc", but SPA 124 has it's own tradition and history.


Whole history (date, place and plane) of Lafayette Squadron in French Air Force there:http://gaubs.free.fr/ESCADRILLES/Escadrilles.htm
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#10 Han

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 20:05

2 Richy133:
May you compile an addition to WWBrian text which will describe post-WW1 History of Fernch Esc.124? Not more than 2000 symbols.

2 WWBrian:
And the same request to you - but about American "child" history.

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#11 WWBrian

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 22:40


2 WWBrian:
And the same request to you - but about American "child" history.

—-

103rd Aero Squadron

The US 103d Aero Squadron was originally formed on 31 August 1917 at Kelly Field in Texas. The unit arrived in France December 1917, and during its first month of deployment, the squadron built hangars at the main American training facility in central France, at Issoudun.

In February 1918 the French-controlled Lafayette Escadrille (Esc. N.124) as well as the Lafayette Flying Corps was disbanded. The American volunteer aviators from those groups were transferred to US control, in the US Army Air Service as the 103rd Aero Squadron, flying SPAD VIIs and SPAD XIIIs.

The officers of the old Lafayette Escadrille were assigned, and the CO. 1Lt Park was replaced by Maj. Thaw, and combat operations commenced under Combat Group 21, Fourth Army (France).

The 103rd Aero Squadron had seen action from many base locations all over the Western Front. First, based at La Noblette in February 1918; followed by a move to the base La Bonne Maison, near Fismes in April; the unit was then moved to Dunkirk/Flanders in May. Later it moved again to Toul in July, as part of the 2nd Pursuit Group to support English operations.

On 29-July-1918 Maj. Thaw was promoted to Ltc and took over 3d Pursuit Group, and capt. Rockwell was made Co.

From Toul, the 103rd Aero Squadron was finally moved to Vaucouleurs where it provided the nucleus of the 3rd Pursuit Group.

After the war the squadron was shipped home from the port of Brest on the 19-Feb-1919.


—-

3rd Pursuit Group

Like the 1st and 2nd Pursuit Groups beforehand, the 3rd Pursuit group was formed by consolidating four squadrons. The 3rd Pursuit Group’s squadrons included the 28th Aero Squadron, 93rd Aero Squadron, 103rd Aero Squadron and the 213th Aero Squadron.

With the decrease in German air opposition, the 3rd Pursuit Group was delegated to non-air superiority missions. And by November 1918, all four squadrons of the 3rd Pursuit Group were engaged in bombing attacks.

Located in Foucaucourt by war’s end, the 3rd Pursuit Group had achieved a total of 87 aerial victories with 26 losses.

—-


So, Esc. N.124 disbanded when French released control and transfered the American volunteer pilots to US control as the 103rd Pursuit Squadron - the 103rd was then one of four squadrons to make up the 3rd Pursuit group.
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#12 Richy133

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 19:29

2 Richy133:
May you compile an addition to WWBrian text which will describe post-WW1 History of French Esc.124? Not more than 2000 symbols.

I'm sorry but english isn't my native language, I think I won't be able to write such a big text without lot of misspellings…

I'm better to translate english in french than the opposite.
I will help to write the french localization, but this is too hard for me. :oops:
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#13 Han

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 23:10

Roger. Than I'll use WWBrian text as UAS sq.103 description (it's possible that it will be added later)
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