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No.208 Squadron / RNAS 8 (GBR) History


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#1 Han

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 17:37

Hello friends. Please assist in writing ENGLISH text of history of the squadron which will be available to player in the first release of the New Career.
It should contains more than 2500 symbols (no upper limit), and it should describe WHOLE history of the squadron - from fundation till it's history end (amy be even till modern days, like for USAF 94th Aero Squadron for example).
Any additional facts and remarks are appreciated.

So please discuss and post your texts here for No.208 Squadron (RNAS 8) Britain squadron

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#2 WWBrian

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:57

From – http://en.wikipedia....08_Squadron_RAF" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://en.wikipedia....08_Squadron_RAF

No. 208 Squadron

The squadron was established as part of the Royal Naval Air Service in October 1916 at Dunkirk as No. 8 (Naval) Squadron.

In its earlier days, the unit flew Sopwith Pups, 1½ Strutters and Nieuport Scouts. Later, the squadron was re-equipped with Sopwith Camels and was assigned to artillery spotting. The squadron returned to the UK briefly before being sent back to France to face the German offensive. While in France a significant number of Camels belonging to the squadron were destroyed by the RAF to stop the Germans capturing them during their advance.

When the Royal Air Force was formed on 1 April 1918, the unit was renumbered to No. 208 Squadron RAF. After the armistice, 208 Squadron remained with the occupying forces until August 1919, when it again returned to the UK for disbandment the following month.

During the Great War, the squadron claimed 298 victories.

Twenty-five aces had served in the squadron. Notable among them were Anthony Arnold, Charles Dawson Booker, Robert J. O. Compston, Harold Day, Stanley Goble, Edward Grahame Johnstone, William Lancelot Jordan, Robert A. Little, William E. G. Mann, Richard Munday, Guy William Price, George Simpson, Reginald Soar, Ronald Thornley, and James White.

The squadron reformed at Ismailia in Egypt on 1 February 1920 by the renumbering of No. 113 Squadron RAF. It was equipped with RE8s and from November 1920 till May 1930 with Bristol Fighters.

208 Squadron was still stationed in Egypt at the outbreak of World War II. It joined the war effort in mid-1940 flying Westland Lysander reconnaissance aircraft and Hawker Hurricane fighters on army co-operation duties in the North African Campaign and the Greek Campaign of 1941. During the war it included a significant number of Royal Australian Air Force and South African Air Force personnel, along with other nationalities.

Shortly after the war, 208 Squadron moved back to Palestine where it was involved in operations against the Egyptian Air Force. In 1948, the squadron moved to the Egyptian Canal Zone. It saw action in the Israeli War of Independence, losing four Spitfires in combat with Israeli Air Force aircraft (which also included Spitfires).

The last officially recorded "Air to Air fighter pilot kill" (bullets only without guidance systems) occurred on 22 May 1948, at 09:30 two Egyptian Spitfire LF.9s decided to stage a third attack on Ramat David. This time Fg Off Tim McElhaw and Fg Off Hully of 208 Squadron had taken over the standing patrol. Fg Off McElhaw, flying Spitfire FR.18 TZ228, managed to intercept and shoot down both LF.9s.

In 1951, the squadron relocated to RAF Fayid where its Spitfires were replaced with Gloster Meteor jets. From there it moved to RAF Abu Sueir, relocating to RAF Takali, Malta, in late 1956, with interim spells earlier in the year at RNAS Hal Far, Malta, and RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus. It disbanded at Takhali in January 1956. It reformed the same month in the UK at RAF Tangmere from a nucleus of No. 34 Squadron RAF.

In June 1964 it moved to Muharraq in Bahrain.The squadron remained in the Middle East until September 1971 when it was disbanded as a consequence of British drawdown of the armed forces from East of Suez.

208 Squadron reformed at RAF Honington in 1974 with Blackburn Buccaneer S2s assigned to SACEUR operating in a low-level strike role. The unit was one of the last squadrons to operate the Buccaneer before it went out of service in 1994, and after the type's retirement the squadron again disbanded on 31 March 1994.

208 Squadron was reformed on 1 April 1994 from 234 (Reserve) Squadron attached to No. 4 Flying Training School. It moved to RAF Valley operating the BAe Hawk that it continues to fly to this day. No.4 FTS is made up of two squadrons; 208 Squadron provides the advanced flying training, students then moving onto 19 Squadron to receive tactics and weapons training.

The vast majority of sorties undertaken by today's 208 Squadron are flown to teach RAF ab-initio pilots the fundamental skills of flying a fast-jet, to prepare them for tactical weapons training and onwards towards front-line aircraft such as the Tornado, Harrier and Typhoon.

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#3 Han

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:14

Great! Thanks for finding.

Completed, thread unstickied.

Any additional details may be added / corrected.

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#4 LukeFF

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 08:25

Some additional details from http://www.theaerodr...ain/rnas/8n.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.theaerodr...com/services/gb … nas/8n.php :

-No. 8 (Naval) Squadron flew its first sortie on 3 November 1916.
-Flight Sub-Lieutenant DMB Galbraith scored the squadron's first victory on 9 November 1916.
-The unit also flew Sopwith Triplanes in addition to the ones listed above.
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#5 LukeFF

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:17

Some grammar / spelling cleanup and info added from http://www.theaerodr...ain/rnas/8n.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.theaerodr...com/services/gb … nas/8n.php and http://www.raf.mod.u...208squadron.cfm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.raf.mod.u...208squadron.cfm :

No 208 Squadron was originally established as part of the Royal Naval Air Service 26 October 1916 at Dunkirk as No 8 (Naval) Squadron and was immediately passed to Royal Flying Corps control. The squadron flew its first sortie on 3 November 1916.

In its earlier days, the unit flew Sopwith Pups, 1½ Strutters and Nieuport Scouts. Flight Sub-Lieutenant DMB Galbraith scored the squadron's first victory on 9 November 1916. In 1917, the unit was re-equipped with Sopwith Triplanes and later with Sopwith Camels and was assigned to artillery spotting. The squadron returned to the UK briefly before being sent back to France to face the German offensive in the spring of 1918, where it would become No 208 Squadron RAF on 1 April 1918. Just over a week later, 16 Camels belonging to the unit had to be destroyed to prevent them from falling into the hands of the advancing German forces.

During the Great War, the squadron claimed 298 victories.

Twenty-five aces had served in the squadron. Notable among them were Anthony Arnold, Charles Dawson Booker, Robert J. O. Compston, Harold Day, Stanley Goble, Edward Grahame Johnstone, William Lancelot Jordan, Robert A. Little, William E. G. Mann, Richard Munday, Guy William Price, George Simpson, Reginald Soar, Ronald Thornley, and James White.

After the Armistice, No 208 Squadron remained with the occupying forces in Germany until August 1919, when it returned to the UK for disbandment at Netheravon in November 1919. The squadron reformed at Ismailia in Egypt on 1 February 1920 by the renumbering of No 113 Squadron RAF. It was equipped with RE8s and from November 1920 until May 1930 with Bristol Fighters.

No 208 Squadron was still stationed in Egypt at the outbreak of World War II. It joined the war effort in mid-1940 flying Westland Lysander reconnaissance aircraft and Hawker Hurricane fighters on army co-operation duties in the North African Campaign and the Greek Campaign of 1941. During the war, it included a significant number of Royal Australian Air Force and South African Air Force personnel, along with other nationalities.

Shortly after the war, 208 Squadron moved back to Palestine where it was involved in operations against the Egyptian Air Force. In 1948, the squadron moved to the Egyptian Canal Zone. It saw action in the Israeli War of Independence, losing four Spitfires in combat with Israeli Air Force aircraft (which also included Spitfires).

The last officially recorded "Air to Air fighter pilot kill" (bullets only without guidance systems) occurred on 22 May 1948, at 09:30 two Egyptian Spitfire LF.9s decided to stage a third attack on Ramat David. This time Fg Off Tim McElhaw and Fg Off Hully of 208 Squadron had taken over the standing patrol. Fg Off McElhaw, flying Spitfire FR.18 TZ228, managed to intercept and shoot down both LF.9s.

In 1951, the squadron relocated to RAF Fayid where its Spitfires were replaced with Gloster Meteor jets. From there it moved to RAF Abu Sueir, relocating to RAF Takali, Malta, in late 1956, with interim spells earlier in the year at RNAS Hal Far, Malta, and RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus. It disbanded at Takhali in January 1956. It reformed the same month in the UK at RAF Tangmere from a nucleus of No 34 Squadron RAF.

In June 1964, it moved to Muharraq in Bahrain. The squadron remained in the Middle East until September 1971 when it was disbanded because of British drawdown of the armed forces from East of Suez.

No 208 Squadron reformed at RAF Honington in 1974 with Blackburn Buccaneer S2s assigned to SACEUR operating in a low-level strike role. The unit was one of the last squadrons to operate the Buccaneer before it went out of service in 1994, and after the type's retirement, the squadron again disbanded on 31 March 1994.

No 208 Squadron was reformed on 1 April 1994 from 234 (Reserve) Squadron attached to No. 4 Flying Training School. It moved to RAF Valley operating the BAe Hawk that it continues to fly to this day. No 4 FTS is made up of two squadrons; 208 Squadron provides the advanced flying training, students then moving onto 19 Squadron to receive tactics and weapons training.

The vast majority of sorties undertaken by today's 208 Squadron are flown to teach RAF ab-initio pilots the fundamental skills of flying a fast jet, to prepare them for tactical weapons training and onwards towards front-line aircraft such as the Tornado, Harrier and Typhoon.

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