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No.29 Squadron (GBR) History


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#1 Han

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 17:36

Hello friends. Please assist in writing ENGLISH text of history of the squadron which will be available to player in the first release of the New Career.
It should contains more than 2500 symbols (no upper limit), and it should describe WHOLE history of the squadron - from fundation till it's history end (amy be even till modern days, like for USAF 94th Aero Squadron for example).
Any additional facts and remarks are appreciated.

So please discuss and post your texts here for No.29 Squadron Britain squadron

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#2 WWBrian

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:41

Taken from – http://en.wikipedia....29_Squadron_RAF" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://en.wikipedia....29_Squadron_RAF

No.29 Squadron

No. 29 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was first raised in 1915, and is one of the world's oldest fighter squadrons.

This unit was first raised as a reserve squadron, initially equipped with the Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c, in November 1915. In early 1916 however No. 29 became the fourth squadron to receive the Airco DH.2 "pusher" fighter, and was posted to France in March 1916 - helping to end the Fokker Scourge and establish Allied air superiority in time for the Battle of the Somme.
By late 1916 the DH.2 was outclassed by new German fighters, but No. 29 kept its pushers until March 1917, when it was re-equipped with Nieuport 17s. These were replaced with later Nieuport types, such as the Nieuport 24bis, as these became available. Due to a shortage of the Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5a the squadron retained its Nieuports until April 1918, becoming possibly the last operational unit to operate “vee strut” Nieuport fighters. At this time the squadron finally received the S.E.5a, which it retained for the rest of the war.

The squadron ended the war having claimed 385 victories. Besides the October 1918 losses, some of the 26 aces serving in the unit were James McCudden, Thomas Sinclair Harrison, Camille Lagesse, Ross, Charles G.Charles G. Ross, Arthur Reed, future Major General Christoffel Venter, James Dennis Payne, Ernest Charles Hoy, Walter Bertram Wood, Francis James Davies, William Molesworth, Edgar O. Amm, Edgar G. Davies, Reginald H. Rusby, Alfred Shepherd, D'Arcy Fowlis Hilton, Arthur G. Jones-Williams, and Sydney Brown.

The squadron was reformed on 1 April 1923, initially equipped with Sopwith Snipes. These were replaced with Gloster Grebes in January 1925, In turn, these were replaced by the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin III A in March 1928 and Bristol Bulldogs in June 1932.

In March 1935, nearly twenty years after it was first raised as a single seat fighter squadron, the squadron received two seater Hawker Demons, which it operated until 1938. This included service in Egypt from October 1935 to 1936, during the Abyssinian crisis. The squadron also operated a few old Fairey Gordons for night patrols in Egypt.

As part of the Royal Air Force’s modernisation and expansion in the late 1930s, No. 29 received Bristol Blenheim F.1 heavy fighters in December 1938.

No. 29 began the Second World War with its Blenheims, which at the period operated as day fighters – especially on convoy protection patrols. From June 1940 it became a night fighter squadron, receiving some of the first Beaufighters in November, though it was February 1941 before the squadron was fully equipped with the new fighter. Various marks of the de Havilland Mosquito were flown by the squadron from May 1943 culminating in the Mosquito NF30. From the middle of 1944 most of the squadron’s missions took it over the continent.

From 1967 the squadron operated the English Electric Lightning F3 at RAF Wattisham until 1974 when they equipped with the F-4 Phantom and moved to RAF Coningsby. A detachment was provided for the defence of the Falklands in August 1982, after the Falklands War, and following repairs to the airfield at Stanley. In 1987, 29 Squadron was one of the first units to receive the Tornado F3; deploying to Saudi Arabia after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and participating in Operation Desert Storm. No. 29 flew the Tornado until disbanding in 1998, as part of the Strategic Defence Review.

No.29 squadron was reformed in 2003, this time as the Typhoon operational conversion unit (OCU). This is its current role continuing into today.

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#3 Han

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 10:36

Great! Thanks for finding.

Completed, thread unstickied.

Any additional details may be added / corrected.

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#4 LukeFF

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:48

Some grammar cleanup and info added from http://www.raf.mod.u.../29squadron.cfm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.raf.mod.u.../29squadron.cfm

No 29 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was initially formed at Gosport on 7 November 1915 as a Royal Flying Corps unit and it is one of the world's oldest fighter squadrons.

No 29 Squadron was first raised as a reserve squadron from an influx of personnel from No 23 Squadron and was initially equipped with the Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c. In early 1916, however, No 29 became the fourth squadron to receive the Airco DH.2 "pusher" fighter. When it was posted to France in March 1916, it was third squadron to be fully equipped with fighters. The squadron’s DH.2s were engaged in escorting the slow and vulnerable reconnaissance aircraft, which helped to bring an end the Fokker Scourge and establish Allied air superiority in time for the Battle of the Somme. The unit’s first victory was achieved on 1 May 1916.

By late 1916, the DH.2 was outclassed by new German fighters, but No 29 kept its pushers until March 1917, when it was re-equipped with Nieuport 17s. These were replaced with later Nieuport types, such as the Nieuport 24bis, as these became available. Due to a shortage of the Royal Aircraft Factory SE.5a, the squadron retained its Nieuports until April 1918, becoming possibly the last operational unit to operate “vee strut” Nieuport fighters. At this time, the squadron finally received the S.E.5a, which it retained for the rest of the war for fighter and ground attack missions.

The squadron ended the war having claimed 385 victories. Besides the October 1918 losses, some of the 26 aces serving in the unit were James McCudden, Thomas Sinclair Harrison, Camille Lagesse, Ross, Charles G.Charles G. Ross, Arthur Reed, future Major General Christoffel Venter, James Dennis Payne, Ernest Charles Hoy, Walter Bertram Wood, Francis James Davies, William Molesworth, Edgar O. Amm, Edgar G. Davies, Reginald H. Rusby, Alfred Shepherd, D'Arcy Fowlis Hilton, Arthur G. Jones-Williams, and Sydney Brown.

Following the war, the squadron briefly remained in Germany before being reduced to a cadre and returned to the UK in 1919, where it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The unit was reformed on 1 April 1923, initially equipped with Sopwith Snipes. These were replaced with Gloster Grebes in January 1925. In turn, these were replaced by the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin III A in March 1928 and Bristol Bulldogs in June 1932.

In March 1935, nearly twenty years after it was first raised as a single seat fighter squadron, the squadron received two-seater Hawker Demons, which it operated until 1938. This included service in Egypt from October 1935 to 1936, during the Abyssinian crisis. The squadron also operated a few old Fairey Gordons for night patrols in Egypt.

As part of the Royal Air Force’s modernisation and expansion in the late 1930s, No 29 received Bristol Blenheim F.1 heavy fighters in December 1938.

No 29 began the Second World War with its Blenheims, which at the period operated as day fighters – especially on convoy protection patrols. From June 1940, it became a night fighter squadron, receiving some of the first Beaufighters in November, though it was February 1941 before the squadron was fully equipped with the new fighter. Various marks of the de Havilland Mosquito were flown by the squadron from May 1943, culminating in the Mosquito NF30. From the middle of 1944, most of the squadron’s missions took it over the European continent.

From 1967, the squadron operated the English Electric Lightning F3 at RAF Wattisham until 1974 when they equipped with the F-4 Phantom and moved to RAF Coningsby. A detachment was provided for the defence of the Falklands in August 1982, after the Falklands War, and following repairs to the airfield at Stanley. In 1987, 29 Squadron was one of the first units to receive the Tornado F3; deploying to Saudi Arabia after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and participating in Operation Desert Storm. No 29 flew the Tornado until disbanding in 1998, as part of the Strategic Defence Review.

No 29 squadron was reformed in 2003, this time as the Typhoon Operational Conversion Unit (OCU). In June 2005, the squadron moved to its home base at RAF Conigsby, where it soon afterwards began teaching pilots of 17® Squadron on a formal course. 29® Squadron officially stood up for operational service on 4 November 2005, where it now trains frontline pilots to fully equip current and future Typhoon squadrons.

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