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BIOGRAPHIES for Career Personages - please assist


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#81 SYN_Bandy

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 00:33

Thank you for pointing that out WWBrian, for some reason I misread and thought they were truncating the depth of the career history, so going back no further than 1916. Oh well, easy enough to recast, as I did above.

Just my opinion, but finding it strange that anyone would want to play any character with a well developed flight history. I prefer the "clean slate", and will write a few more in a similar vein. Hope they go over well!

Regards, and S!
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#82 WWBrian

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 00:43

np Bandy - good stuff!

…but at the risk of coming off as the "Bio Police", I think you meant "rotary" and not radial, which you mention twice.
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#83 LukeFF

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 05:45

American Religious (WHATEVER you may imagine for GER/FRA/GBR/US air forces pilot)

<p><i>"A good mother is the greatest blessing ever bestowed on a family of children; and a godless, wicked, worldly mother is the greatest curse that ever blighted a home!"</i></p>

<br><p>$[name] was born $[birthdate] in Greenville, Mississippi to a large evangelical Southern Baptist family. $[firstName]’s father, Samuel $[lastName] was a shrewd hard-working businessman. His mother, Mabel was a kind and loving soul to all those around her and was a major source of inspiration throughout young $[firstName]’s life.</p>
<p>Showing promise as young adult, $[lastName] traveled to Washington D.C. and began studying theology at Georgetown University. During the course of his studies, $[lastName]’s father became mysteriously ill, and $[firstName] postponed his schooling to return home to tend to the family emergency. A few days after he returned home in March of 1915, $[lastName]’s father Samuel suddenly and unexpectedly passed away. $[firstName] took his father’s death so hard that it shook his faith to the core. Forsaken and empty, $[lastName] began drinking heavily to escape his overwhelming grief.</p>
<p>$[lastName] would not end up returning to his studies after his father’s death, preferring instead to wallow in the bottom of his next bottle. During the following month, deep into his ongoing depression, $[lastName] had traveled to New York City with his mother to see her off on a trip she needed to take to meet with relatives in Liverpool, England.</p>
<p>Arriving at Pier 54 in the morning hours of 1 May 1915, the ship $[firstName]’s mother was to take happened to be running two-hours behind schedule, and Mabel used that time to console her son. It is still unknown to this day what was said during those private moments, but the revelations it would bring to $[name] in the following days would be profound.</p>
<p>Six days later, his mother’s ship, RMS<i> Lusitania</i> would be sunk by a German submarine off the southern coast of Ireland. His mother would be among the 885 victims to never be recovered. When news of this tragedy reached $[lastName] a week later, it would shock him into the salvation he so desperately needed.</p>
<p>Within the following year and unable to return to the University, $[name] joined the U.S Army to preach the unsearchable riches of Christ. With the onset of war, $[lastName] first posted to the American Field Service. During his time in northern France on the front lines, $[lastName] would spend entire days anointing and performing last rites for dying soldiers.</p>
<p>Certain there must be a better way God intended humans to wage war against one another, $[name] transferred to the Army Air Service in an attempt to get “closer to God”. After receiving his flight training, $[name] was posted to $[squad] on $[startDate].</p>

<br><p><i>…he continues being heard reciting scripture to both friends and foe alike.</i></p>




…if this could be double-checked for errors, (especially gramatical issues and sentance structure) that would be appreciated.

Brian, I just noticed a couple of small grammar changes that needed to be made, and I changed 'submarine' to 'U-boat,' since that is what they are called in the German navy.

<p><i>"A good mother is the greatest blessing ever bestowed on a family of children; and a godless, wicked, worldly mother is the greatest curse that ever blighted a home!"</i></p>

<br><p>$[name] was born $[birthdate] in Greenville, Mississippi to a large evangelical Southern Baptist family. $[firstName]’s father, Samuel $[lastName] was a shrewd, hard-working businessman. His mother, Mabel, was a kind and loving soul to all those around her and was a major source of inspiration throughout young $[firstName]’s life.</p>
<p>Showing promise as a young adult, $[lastName] traveled to Washington D.C. and began studying theology at Georgetown University. During the course of his studies, $[lastName]’s father became mysteriously ill, and $[firstName] postponed his schooling to return home to tend to the family emergency. A few days after he returned home in March of 1915, $[lastName]’s father Samuel suddenly and unexpectedly passed away. $[firstName] took his father’s death so hard that it shook his faith to the core. Forsaken and empty, $[lastName] began drinking heavily to escape his overwhelming grief.</p>
<p>$[lastName] would not end up returning to his studies after his father’s death, preferring instead to wallow in the bottom of his next bottle. During the following month, deep into his ongoing depression, $[lastName] had traveled to New York City with his mother to see her off on a trip she needed to take to meet with relatives in Liverpool, England.</p>
<p>Arriving at Pier 54 in the morning hours of 1 May 1915, the ship $[firstName]’s mother was to take happened to be running two-hours behind schedule, and Mabel used that time to console her son. It is still unknown to this day what was said during those private moments, but the revelations it would bring to $[name] in the following days would be profound.</p>
<p>Six days later, his mother’s ship, RMS<i> Lusitania</i> would be sunk by a German U-boat off the southern coast of Ireland. His mother would be among the 885 victims to never be recovered. When news of this tragedy reached $[lastName] a week later, it would shock him into the salvation he so desperately needed.</p>
<p>Within the following year and unable to return to the University, $[name] joined the U.S. Army to preach the unsearchable riches of Christ. With the onset of war, $[lastName] first posted to the American Field Service. During his time in northern France on the front lines, $[lastName] would spend entire days anointing and performing last rites for dying soldiers.</p>
<p>Certain there must be a better way God intended humans to wage war against one another, $[name] transferred to the Army Air Service in an attempt to get “closer to God.” After receiving his flight training, $[name] was posted to $[squad] on $[startDate].</p>

<br><p><i>…he continues being heard reciting scripture to both friends and foe alike.</i></p>

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#84 SYN_Bandy

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 13:41

A Commonwealth Australian biography. Station hand

<p>$[name] was born into a simple grazier's family at a sheep station on $[birthDate] near Perth, Australia. From an early age he was an adventurous lad and would head off into the interior with only his bush kettle and Blue Heeler dog in tow. One day a rather eccentric Irish gentleman, Winston Ginty, showed up on the Perth docks with a strange contraption made of sticks, wire, and canvas that soon was airborne and circling over the harbor. When $[firstName] heard he was looking for a bushguide he introduced himself and bought Ginty a pint of the local ale. They were soon fast friends. Little did $[firstName] know that he would be guiding Ginty into the outback for the first attempt at crossing Australia by air! However, the adventure didn’t last long and was lost to history when they crash landed soon after takeoff in a freak down draft. Ginty lost his left arm and only survived through $[firstName]’s quick action. Despite the bad luck and bruises $[firstName] was smitten by flying</p>

<p>Soon after the Commonwealth of Australia was drawn into the Great European conflict. $[lastName] enlisted and embarked with the First Australian Imperial Force. While most of his unit spent their long trans-oceanic voyage on deck, he was fascinated by the ship’s big engines and pestered the chief engineer to explain everything. Showing a tremendous aptitude for anything mechanical, after arrival at Gallipoli he was sent to the repair shops where he had the chance opportunity to work on a damaged aeroplane engine, one of only a few in that theatre of war. $[lastName] delivered the repaired engine to the nearby reconnaissance unit and caught the eye of the adjutant who arranged a local transfer to the R.F.C. $[lastName] was one step closer to flying.</p>

<p>After evacuation from the Dardanelles, $[lastName] was sent for formal mechanics’ training and began servicing Be2’s in No.10 Squadron at St. Omer late in 1915. Some of the pilots would allow $[firstName] to come along on test flights of repaired aircraft. On one of these occasions they were surprised by a lone German Fokker far behind the lines. Fortunately the BE2 still had the observer’s Lewis gun mounted, so $[lastName] swung into action. After putting several bullets through their own tail planes he managed a lucky shot and holed the Fokker’s petrol tank, sending the German scurrying for his lines. $[lastName] received a promotion to Sergeant and a transfer to No.44 Observer Training School at Waddington, where he was one step closer to his goal.</p>

<p>While at No.44 $[firstName] became reacquainted with Winston Ginty, now a flight instructor, who took him up during spare time. Once again $[lastName] showed a natural talent for stick and rudder, but if he was going to become a pilot he needed to do something brash. He convinced the Training Squadron Commander of his worth by first repairing and then soloing in an old hangar queen. $[lastName] would become a pilot after all!</p>

<p>Once $[lastName]completed proper flight training he was posted to $[squad] in France. On $[startDate], $[startRank] $[name] crossed the front for the first time, and his adventurous spirit soared! <i>But will raw talent and sheer perseverance be enough?</i></p>


Edited on March 15 for spelling and authentic Australian vernacular suggestions as provided. Please use this version if possible. Thank you!
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#85 FlatSpinMan

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 14:41

Just noticed one spelling point in the Commonwealth Australian bio -
Last line
"But would raw talent and shear perseverance be enough" should be "sheer"
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#86 SYN_Bandy

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 13:09

I haven't read any of the other posts/biographies, mostly because I do not want to be influenced by the style and what others are writing. It's very easy to "boiler plate" things like this, and then they're just repetitive.
I've taken what I hope is a simple narrative approach, providing hopefully just enough background details, justification, and conflict (conflict is important!) to flesh out the main character and keep it interesting, without writing a novel.
It ain't easy, and I hope these are enjoyable quick reads and will work for the task at hand.


Commonwealth Newfoundland, fisherman

<p>On $[birthDate] $[name] was brought into the world kicking and screaming at Pouch Cove, Newfoundland. Born to a traditional fishing family $[firstName] followed his father and took up the call of the sea, as well as his love of music and the ceilidh. After his father was swept overboard and lost in a storm, $[firstName] renounced his God and took up the call of the bottle. On the anniversary of his death while particularly intoxicated, $[lastName] took insult to a not so idle comment from one of the local constabulary. He made the offender take back his words the only way he knew how, with his fists. For striking an officer of the law $[name] was given the choice of prison or enlistment. He chose enlistment in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment.</p>

<p>In what seemed the blink of an eye, $[name] found himself in the hell of battle-torn Beaumont Hamel in July 1916, with many of his close comrades blown to pieces as they huddled in the trenches. Having never been denied the freedom of the sea, $[firstName] now was barred the ability to even see the horizon. His war was a hate-filled purgatory, with the Germans holding the key, or so it seemed to his tortured soul. When the call came for a volunteer for Иballoon duty’, $[lastName] took the opportunity to escape the trenches. </p>

<p>Soon enough he was in a basket at 4000 feet assisting the observer, Major Dutie of RFC No.1 Balloon Squadron. $[firstName]’s sea legs provided immunity to the balloon’s gyrations, and the Major was a kindly man, much like his father. As time passed the Major took on a mentoring role, and $[firstName] learned to love the sky as much as the sea. During the late summer of 1916 their balloon was aloft over the Somme, supporting the largest offensive yet staged on the Western Front. One overcast day the whole balloon crew was completely surprised when a German scout attacked from the clouds. They both jumped from the basket, but burning debris fell on Major Dutie’s parachute and he plummeted to his death as $[firstName] watched helplessly. There and then he vowed total revenge.</p>

<p>Very much to his surprise, a few days later $[firstName] discovered that the Major had pulled some strings and arranged a transfer for him to the Royal Flying Corps. Time again passed quickly at No.6 Flight Training School, and in what seemed a little more than it took to Иpay the devil’ of a ship, $[name] found himself promoted to $[startRank] in $[startDate] with $[squad] as a very green pilot. <i>However, this time he had a machine gun in hand, hate in his heart, and revenge raging in his soul!</i></p>
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#87 DidNotFinish

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 20:37

Han, in your first post, you have "French Traveler" as one that hasn't been done, but on page 8 you have me down as doing one for "French Traveler." Might want to change it on the first page to avoid confusion. :)
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#88 Zoring

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 13:30

Hello chaps, here is a German Nobleman and a German Skilled Labourer, both mostly fictional, although the Nobleman's injury from being Lanced actually happened to an adjutant from Jasta 11 iirc who's name i cannot find right at this moment and the Skilled labourer being very loosely based on my Great-Grandfather who was a Gefrieter in the infantry. Will we be credited for these? If so can we have them under our real names (at least i would like to)?

German Skilled Labourer, Schleswig-Holstein

Edit:
This version has been slightly amended and appears in a later post

German Nobleman, Saxony.

<p>Born $[birthDate], $[name] would grow up on his familial estates in Saxony, during his upbringing $[lastName] would receive tutelage in the classical skills of the nobility: Riding, Hunting, Shooting and High society. Hunting and shooting for most of his young life would hone [lastName]'s marksmanship abilities to a very useful degree. The art of deflection shooting was virtually unknown in the early days of aerial combat and the leading of a bird in flight was to provide a valuable analogue to air to air shooting. These skills learned as part of his noble upbringing would later prove vital in the hellish crucible of the Great War.</p>

<p>Commissioned into the Königlich Sächsisches 2. Ulanen-Regiment Nr. 18, $[lastName] would serve in 58th Infantry Division, formed in March 1915, the Division would fight in the Second Battle of Artois in May 1915, where much to his and his comrades chagrin the Ulanen-Regiment spent most of it's time reconnoitering and digging trenches along with their infantry comrades, far from the glorious cavalry charges imagined by the young noblemen. Upon seeing the first aircraft in the air flying above the battlefields $[lastName] began to believe his place was no longer as a cavalryman but as a flyer in this modern era.</p>

<p>It was whilst serving in his Uhlan regiment that $[name] would receive a wound from that most ancient of weapons, a lance. Despite the rapid decline of Cavalry in the Great War $[firstName] would still end up wounded (much to his frustration) in his first actual cavalry skirmish. Whilst on a mounted reconniasance mission $[lastName] and his Squadron would encounter an enemy cavalry patrol in a depression on a similar mission, spurring down the slope the two cavalry forces would clash briefly and the enemy troop was repulsed, in this engagment $[lastName] was struck and wounded in the shoulder by an enemy lance. During his time of recuperation $[lastName] arranged through his contacts a transfer to the Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. After training $[lastName] served as most German pilots; in two-seaters. There he flew vital photographic and artillery spotting missions.</p>

<p>Although pleased with his transfer to two seaters $[lastName] would be tantalized by the exploits of the early aces; the exploits of the famous Fokker scourge and the decorations and adulations it brought were strong and vivid in his mind. Application was made and thanks to his contacts and noble upbringing $[name] was soon approved and transferred to single-seat figher training. Now in the summer of 1916 in the skies above France $[lastName] began to experience the modern air combat, as a fighter pilot. $[name] joined $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
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#89 BroadSide

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 17:33

Will we be credited for these? If so can we have them under our real names (at least i would like to)?

I'd prefer not to be credited and am not in favor of real names.
These biographies are for the player to choose…it has nothing to do with the ones who wrote the bios….
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#90 Zoring

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 17:44

Well you certainly don't have to have your name appear if you don't want to, I would.
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#91 ImPeRaToR

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 18:35

Hello chaps, here is a German Nobleman and a German Skilled Labourer, both mostly fictional, although the Nobleman's injury from being Lanced actually happened to an adjutant from Jasta 11 iirc who's name i cannot find right at this moment and the Skilled labourer being very loosely based on my Great-Grandfather who was a Gefreiter in the infantry. Will we be credited for these? If so can we have them under our real names (at least i would like to)?

German Skilled Labourer, Schleswig-Holstein

<p>A native of Schleswig-Holstein $[name] was born on $[birthDate]. Raised on the border of Germany and Denmark $[firstName] became a fluent speaker in both German and Danish. It was whilst serving an apprenticeship as a Carpenter that $[firstName] realised his further passion for engines and machinery. In his spare time he worked on his neighbours farm machinery and became an adept mechanic. The outbreak of the Great War meant that $[firstName] like many of his friends, enlisted and began service in the 163rd Schleswig-Holstein Infantry Regiment.</p>

<p>The Battle of Mons on 23 August 1914 was narrowly missed by the Regiment, the regiment being on a 36 hour train ride towards the battle area at that time. However the Regiment and $[firstName] would soon go into action at Mechelin and Leuven, soon after the regiment deployed south, fighting on the Aisne, at Noyon and Roye. During his service as an Infantryman [firstName] was noted for his potential and promoted to Gefreiter. However soon after his promtion, whilst manning the line at Noyon $[lastName] was wounded by shrapnel and had to spend time recuperating at a field hospital in the rear. The wound proved more serious than first thought and $[firstName] ended up spending several months recuperating</p>

<p>During his recovery time $[firstName] received a stroke of luck when a former Uhlan officer now serving in the air services, automobile broke down. $[firstName] successfully repaired it and following a conversation with the officer, dispensation was given for him to join the fledgling Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. Serving initially as a mechanic, where his skills with engines and carpentry where found to be invaluable $[name] soon realised that what he wanted more than anything was to fly. This initially proved problematic as his Commanding Officer saw the value in his skills as a ground crewman. Not to be dissuaded $[name] continued applying and eventually permission for flight training was given and $[firstName] commenced his flight training in August 1915. In early 1916 $[firstName] began serving in Aviatik two-seaters, flying reconnaissance missions. </p>

<p>The growing need for Jagdflieger and $[firstName]'s growing frustration with the role of an Artillery spotter and being the target of agressive attacks by enterprising Royal Flying Corps Scout pilots, resulted in a an application, approval and transfer single-seaters, for eventual posting to a fighter squadron. Following a further period of training $[name] would finally reach a fighter unit in the Summer of 1916. With his passion for machines and training $[name] is still sometimes found with the mechanics working on his own aircraft. However his passion for flying will soon bring him into contact with the enemy; for the first time on his own terms, as a Jagdflieger. $[name] then joined $[squad] on $[startdate].</p>

German Nobleman, Saxony.

<p>Born $[birthDate], $[name] would grow up on his familial estates in Saxony, during his upbringing $[lastName] would receive tutelage in the classical skills of the nobility: Riding, Hunting, Shooting and High society. Hunting and shooting for most of his young life would hone [lastName]'s marksmanship abilities to a very useful degree. The art of deflection shooting was virtually unknown in the early days of aerial combat and the leading of a bird in flight was to provide a valuable analogue to air to air shooting. These skills learned as part of his noble upbringing would later prove vital in the hellish crucible of the Great War.</p>

<p>Commissioned into the Königlich Sächsisches 2. Ulanen-Regiment Nr. 18, $[lastName] would serve in 58th Infantry Division, formed in March 1915, the Division would fight in the Second Battle of Artois in May 1915, where much to his and his comrades chagrin the Ulanen-Regiment spent most of it's time reconnoitring and digging trenches along with their infantry comrades, far from the glorious cavalry charges imagined by the young noblemen. Upon seeing the first aircraft in the air flying above the battlefields $[lastName] began to believe his place was no longer as a cavalryman but as a flyer in this modern era.</p>

<p>It was whilst serving in his Uhlan regiment that $[name] would receive a wound from that most ancient of weapons, a lance. Despite the rapid decline of Cavalry in the Great War $[firstName] would still end up wounded (much to his frustration) in his first actual cavalry skirmish. Whilst on a mounted reconnaissance mission $[lastName] and his Squadron would encounter an enemy cavalry patrol in a depression on a similar mission, spurring down the slope the two cavalry forces would clash briefly and the enemy troop was repulsed, in this engagement $[lastName] was struck and wounded in the shoulder by an enemy lance. During his time of recuperation $[lastName] arranged through his contacts a transfer to the Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. After training $[lastName] served as most German pilots; in two-seaters. There he flew vital photographic and artillery spotting missions.</p>

<p>Although pleased with his transfer to two-seaters $[lastName] would be tantalized by the exploits of the early aces; the exploits of the famous Fokker scourge and the decorations and adulations it brought were strong and vivid in his mind. Application was made and thanks to his contacts and noble upbringing $[name] was soon approved and transferred to single-seat figher training. Now in the summer of 1916 in the skies above France $[lastName] began to experience the modern air combat, as a fighter pilot. $[name] joined $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>

Nice! Fixed spelling on Gefreiter and some other words my plugin vocabulary underlined :).
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#92 SYN_Bandy

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 21:17

Well you certainly don't have to have your name appear if you don't want to, I would.

"Author names" should not be part of the overall campaign GUI IMHO, it would be a distraction and detract from the player experience.

That said, perhaps just an overall acknowledgment of the contributors somewhere else, and this thread can be linked if somebody wants to find out who wrote what.

Really guys, after all this wouldn't be a very bright star on your resume or curriculum vitae
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#93 DidNotFinish

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 22:00

+1…no forum names! :o

BUT, will those who contributed be featured in the credits? ;)
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#94 ImPeRaToR

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 22:21

I am sure contributors will be listed in the credits ("about" in the main menu).
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#95 Zoring

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  • Posts: 850

Posted 10 March 2011 - 04:11

Thanks Imperator, everyone is doing these in English not American English correct?

That is what I meant that contributors be listed in the Credits, I wouldn't want to see my name appear in the biography by any means. Although I am surely not the only person who would like to point to my name in the credits of a fine game like this and feel I contributed in this small way.

I will be posting up French Noble and Hereditary Military biographies this afternoon.
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#96 Branwell

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  • Posts: 200

Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:26

Nice one Zoring - hope you don't mind, but I offer the changes below (in red) to make it flow a little better in English…


German Skilled Labourer, Schleswig-Holstein

<p>A native of Schleswig-Holstein $[name] was born on $[birthDate]. Raised on the border of Germany and Denmark $[firstName] became a fluent speaker in both German and Danish. It was whilst serving an apprenticeship as a Carpenter that $[firstName] realised his further passion for engines and machinery. In his spare time he worked on his neighbours farm machinery and became an adept mechanic. The outbreak of the Great War meant that $[firstName], like many of his friends, enlisted and began service in the 163rd Schleswig-Holstein Infantry Regiment.</p>

<p>The Battle of Mons on 23 August 1914 was narrowly missed by the Regiment, as they were a 36 hour train ride from the battle area at that time. However the Regiment and $[firstName] would soon go into action at Mechelin and Leuven, after the regiment deployed south and fought on the Aisne, at Noyon and Roye. During his service as an Infantryman [firstName] was noted for his potential and promoted to Gefreiter. However soon after his promtion, whilst manning the line at Noyon $[lastName] was wounded by shrapnel and had to spend time recuperating at a field hospital in the rear. The wound proved more serious than first thought and $[firstName] ended up spending several months out of action</p>

<p>During his recovery time $[firstName] received a stroke of luck when the automobile of a former Uhlan officer, now serving in the air services, broke down near the hospital. $[firstName] successfully repaired it and, following a conversation with the officer, dispensation was given for him to join the fledgling Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. Serving initially as a mechanic, where his skills with engines and carpentry where found to be invaluable $[name] soon realised that what he wanted more than anything was to fly. This initially proved problematic as his Commanding Officer saw the value in his skills as a ground crewman. Not to be dissuaded $[name] continued applying and eventually permission for flight training was given and $[firstName] commenced his flight training in August 1915. In early 1916 $[firstName] began serving in Aviatik two-seaters, flying reconnaissance missions. </p>

<p>The growing need for Jagdflieger and $[firstName]'s growing frustration with the role of an Artillery spotter and being the target of agressive attacks by enterprising Royal Flying Corps Scout pilots, resulted in an application, approval and transfer to single-seaters, for eventual posting to a fighter squadron. Following a further period of training $[name] would finally reach a fighter unit in the Summer of 1916. With his passion for machines and training $[name] is still sometimes found with the mechanics working on his own aircraft. However his passion for flying will soon bring him into contact with the enemy; for the first time on his own terms, as a Jagdflieger. $[name] then joined $[squad] on $[startdate].</p>

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#97 Zoring

Zoring
  • Posts: 850

Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:56

Ok here is the final version of the text. Thanks for the amendments :)

German Skilled Labourer

<p>A native of Schleswig-Holstein $[name] was born on $[birthDate]. Raised on the border of Germany and Denmark $[firstName] became a fluent speaker in both German and Danish. It was whilst serving an apprenticeship as a Carpenter that $[firstName] realised his further passion for engines and machinery. In his spare time he worked on his neighbours farm machinery and became an adept mechanic. The outbreak of the Great War meant that $[firstName], like many of his friends, enlisted and began service in the 163rd Schleswig-Holstein Infantry Regiment.</p>

<p>The Battle of Mons on 23 August 1914 was narrowly missed by the Regiment, as they were embarked on a 36 hour train ride to the battle area at that time. However the Regiment and $[firstName] would soon go into action at Mechelin and Leuven, after the regiment deployed south and fought on the Aisne, at Noyon and Roye. During his service as an Infantryman [firstName] was noted for his potential and promoted to Gefreiter. However soon after his promtion, whilst manning the line at Noyon $[lastName] was wounded by shrapnel and had to spend time recuperating at a field hospital in the rear. The wound proved more serious than first thought and $[firstName] ended up spending several months out of action</p>

<p>During his recovery time $[firstName] received a stroke of luck when the automobile of a former Uhlan officer, now serving in the air services, broke down near the hospital. $[firstName] successfully repaired it and, following a conversation with the officer, dispensation was given for him to join the fledgling Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. Serving initially as a mechanic, where his skills with engines and carpentry where found to be invaluable $[name] soon realised that what he wanted more than anything was to fly. This initially proved problematic as his Commanding Officer saw the value in his skills as a ground crewman. Not to be dissuaded $[name] continued applying and eventually permission for flight training was given and $[firstName] commenced his flight training in August 1915. In early 1916 $[firstName] began serving in Aviatik two-seaters, flying reconnaissance missions. </p>

<p>The growing need for Jagdflieger and $[firstName]'s growing frustration with the role of an Artillery spotter and being the target of agressive attacks by enterprising Royal Flying Corps Scout pilots, resulted in an application, approval and transfer to single-seaters, for eventual posting to a fighter squadron. Following a further period of training $[name] would finally reach a fighter unit in the Summer of 1916. With his passion for machines and training $[name] is still sometimes found with the mechanics working on his own aircraft. However his passion for flying will soon bring him into contact with the enemy; for the first time on his own terms, as a Jagdflieger. $[name] then joined $[squad] on $[startdate].</p>
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#98 MarcoRossolini

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  • LocationMelbourne, Australia

Posted 10 March 2011 - 10:25

Hmm sounds interesting, could it be possible that I could try writing a few? :) :)
What do I need to know and what should I include etc?
Edit: wait it took me to the developer assistance be writing it up soon.
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#99 Branwell

Branwell
  • Posts: 200

Posted 10 March 2011 - 10:56

How about this for a British commoner…

<p> $[name] was born into a large family in Lampeter, Wales, on $[birthdate]. As a young boy $[firstName] spent his free time roaming alone in the Teifi Valley, frequently journeying to the ancient gold mine at nearby Dolaucothi, from where he would hope to catch a glimpse of the magnificent red kites, that were near to extinction. $[firstName] was a dreamer, and never really fitted into school, preferring his own company. He left school at 13 and worked locally, running errands for the owner of a grocery shop in Lampeter, which allowed him to indulge his desire for a life outdoors. In his spare time, $[firstName] would often disappear into the countryside for hours on end, hunting rabbits with his father's shotgun</p>

<p> At the outbreak of the war, $[firstName] enlisted into the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division. The Division was one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved North to Ypres. Perhaps because of his hard upbringing in the Welsh countryside, $[firstName] coped well with the rigours of life in the infantry, and his natural self-reliance and hunting spirit led to him being well suited to the duties of a sniper.</p>

<p> $[firstName] began to gather quite a reputation in this role, often venturing into no man's land for protracted periods to hunt his quarry and he seldom returned back to the lines without having made a kill. In these early months of the war, however, $[firstName] enjoyed his role for a different reason - he could be the master of his own time, away from Sergeant Majors and, although he kept a trained sniper's eye out for trouble, he would also spend his time watching wildlife. As aircraft became a more common sight over the battlefield, $[firstName]'s thoughts often drifted back to the V-tailed red kites gracefully soaring over the valleys of his youth.</p>

<p>During the battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1915, and following the 2nd Welsh's stalled attack as part of the first wave, $[firstName] shared a shellhole with a Royal Flying Corps observer, whose craft had been downed by German AA fire. The flyer was also Welsh and from Llandovery, close to $[firstName]'s home, and in the time they spent together they talked of home and flying. Inspired by this, $[firstName] put in his transfer papers to the RFC almost as soon as he had regained his own trench line.</p>

<p> And so it was, that after training at the Central Flying School $[firstName] was posted to No2 Sqn, RFC, where he flew reconnaissance missions as an observer in BE-2s. However, $[firstName]'s single-mindedness and aggressive hunting instinct soon began to shine through again and on $[startDate] $[startRank] $[lastName] received orders to transfer to $[squad] to fly single-seater scouts, where he could soar, wheel and kill, like the red kites of his childhood.</p>
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#100 MarcoRossolini

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  • Posts: 2991
  • LocationMelbourne, Australia

Posted 10 March 2011 - 11:28

GB Commonwealth flier, Australia.

<p>$[name] was born on a small farm in Victoria, Australia near the town of Mildura, on the $[birthdate]. His father was a cattle grazer and owned the farm. He grew up making a five mile walk to the nearest school, $[firstname] was an adventurous and often unruly student. He went badly in his studies and could barely write his name when he left School. He left school as soon as he could and began working full time on his father's farm. He found the farm work even more boring then the school work, and left to find work in Ballarat. There he found work as a labourer. He lived in poorly built apartment on the edge of town for five years. Eventually he was promoted to a carter, but that as far as he rose, he found controlling the cart at first exciting, but it soon became monotonous. It was his job to cart the horse-droppings left on the streets everyday and take them to be put into fertiliser. In his free time $[firstname] courted a rich girl who he tried to take to the best venues with his meagre earnings and pretend to be a rich man about town. This all collapsed when she saw him one evening doing his work, realised she had been lied to and never spoke to him again.</p>

<p>War broke out not even a day later, and out of anger and grief went to enlist the moment he heard of it. $[firstname] joined the 7th battalion of the 2nd brigade, AIF, commanded by Colonel "Pompey" Elliot and was sent to Egypt for training. The British officers there disliked the weather and disliked the troops under their command, and disliked him most of all. Despite this he was promoted to Sergeant, and when he saw his first aeroplane flying overhead near Cairo, he fell in love. He went to his Captain, who refused yo transfer him. He then committed the grievous error of going over the Captain's head and went to Elliot, he was refused, and was told he was too good a sergeant. The Captain heard of it and he was surreptitiously demoted to Corporal. He continued to write sad love letters to the girl, but she did not reply to him and he gave up eventually, two days before they left for the Dardenelles.</p>

<p>The Battalion was amongst the first wave on the beach at Gallipoli, and he was mentioned in dispatches for leading a group of men against a machine gun post that had pinned down his Company, where he was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal. $[firstname] continued to serve at Gallipoli until at Lone Pine, when he was shot in the leg and evacuated. the injury was bad enough that $[firstname] was taken out of the Battalion, it was then that he asked for again for a transfer to the RFC while in hospital. There followed an anxious month of waiting until it was this time accepted, and in September 1915 he was sent to France to train as a Mechanic. $[firstname] was still limping slightly from the wound. He was however quickly taken out at put into flight training. He went well in his learning and was promoted swiftly to $[startRank].</p>


Edit:I put in ranks for Australian ground units, voided I imagine when he joins the RFC, is that okay?
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#101 DidNotFinish

DidNotFinish
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Posted 10 March 2011 - 11:53

Guys, I feel we're going to have too many British biographies and like two French ones. :lol: Wheres' Fifi?! 8-)
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#102 Branwell

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 11:59

? <shrugs in a Gallic way> :)
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#103 SYN_Bandy

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 12:15

Guys, I feel we're going to have too many British biographies and like two French ones. :lol: Wheres' Fifi?! 8-)

Mmm yes, we'll have to draft up some other nationalities to round things out. The more the merrier. I'll take a stab this weekend…

And yes, what I suggested by my post re: authorship was a simple place for each author on the credits/acknowledgment page of the campaign GUI, just not with the actual bio as I think somebody else may have posted.
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#104 Zoring

Zoring
  • Posts: 850

Posted 10 March 2011 - 12:31

With a whiff of cheese some French Biographies arrive. Actually hopefully I have managed to avoid any hilarious garlic munching stereotypes. Also for the record I certainly never stated i wanted my name in the Biography, all I said was 'are we going to be credited'

French Nobleman, Normandy.

<p>A privileged son of formerly exiled French nobility $[name] was born on $[birthDate] near Rouen, the historic medieval capital of Haute-Normandie, where he lived his childhood on the ancient family pastoral estates. Tracing their lineage back to the pre-revolutionary French nobility the $[lastName] family had encountered many changes since those early days. The young $[firstName] was a whimsical youth, not athletic or gifted at sport but possessing a keen, if easily distracted mind. He would dabble in many pursuits from riding, writing, shooting and art. Nothing would eventually end up maintaining his interest too long. A sense of wanderlust gripped the youth and he began to travel throughout France, where not unexpectedly he fell into the passionate embrace of wine, women and song. It was during these travels that he eventually found what he felt was his true calling, Aviation.</p>

<p>The family pastoral estates had been in the family name since the 1500's where the direct ancestor of $[firstName] had first settled, a Noblesse chevaleresque named Bertrand $[lastName] he had spent time as a Chevalier and had gained many laurels and wealth fighting the enemies of the French crown. Many years later in the dark days of the French Revolution the $[lastName] family was in great danger and like much of the French nobility had to flee to England. There they lived lives of hardship and exile for several generations. It was not until the collapse of the Second French Empire and the institution of the French Third republic that $[firstName]'s Grandfather Luc $[lastName] was to return to France and re-acquire the ancestral lands of the family. Through the efforts of Luc and his son Thierry the $[lastName] family was to expand their farming estates in Normandy, where Thierry would become very successful in developing the traditional family land into a highly efficient farming operation, with his wife $[name] bearing him a son $[name].</p>

<p>Whilst travelling through France $[firstName] was swept up in the passion for aviation sweeping France at the time. $[firstName] saw the demonstrations of Louis Blériot and the other brave pioneers of flying and fell instantly in love with the dream of flying. It was the launching of Louis Blériot successful crossing of the English Channel on the 25th of July 1909 that was to truly ignite $[firstName]'s desire to take to the air. With Blériot's success and instant celebrity status $[firstName] became determined to be a pilot and emulate his hero. Aviation was not a cheap pursuit but with the assistance of his families successful farming estates he returned home the proud possessor of a Blériot XI aircraft, where with boundless enthusiasm and more bravery than common sense $[firstName] taught himself to fly.</p>

<p>The coming of the Great War saw $[lastName] enlisting in the Service Aéronautique where his invaluable flying experience meant posting as a flight instructor. Keenly watching the news of the air-war $[firstName] would become further enraptured by the thought of aerial combat when hearing of the exploits of the pioneering French pilot Roland Garros, whose experiments with forward firing machine guns and deflectors greatly excited $[firstName]. It became his fervent desire to join these pioneering pilots in the romanticised duels of the flying Chevalier.</p>

<p>His repeated requests were denied, his valuable flying experience was considered vital for the training of new pilots, however nothing would dissuade him, eventually after nearly a year of persistent requests his Commanding Officer conceded and he was posted to the front, so now $[name] would join $[squad] on $[startdate] to realise his ambition and see for himself the true nature of aerial warfare.</p>

French Hereditary Military, Southern France.

<p>$[name] was born on $[birthDate] in the city of Montpellier in the Languedoc-Rousillion region of Southern France, where the $[lastName] family were to settle after France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. A family with a long military history young $[firstName] was raised by his caring mother and his military serving father, a former Sergent-chef in a Régiment d'Infantrie. The young $[firstName] was an avid sportsman and boxer in his young life, which made him a fit and strong young man. With his family history and his father's service $[firstName] had been encouraged and coached by his father for a career in the military. In 1911 with a desire to travel he would move to the city of Paris where the entire city was swept up in a fervour for aviation. This piqued the interest of $[firstName], and with the growing tensions in Europe he enlisted in the war to begin his service as a humble 'Poilu'.</p>

<p>The family traces it's military history reliably back to the American Revolutionary War of 1776. It is known from family records that Augustin $[lastName] served as a Sergent in the French forces that fought alongside the American revolutionaries in that conflict. As part of these forces he was with the Americans during the unsuccesful Siege of Savannah in Octover 1779, where he was killed by British millitia in an ill-advised assault upon the defences. He was survived by his wife and young son.</p>

<p>His son Daniau $[lastName] would participate in the French revolution, the overthrow of the French Aristocracy between 1789-1799. Daniau was to date the most militarily successful of the $[lastName] family serving in nearly all of the campaigns of the Emperor Napoleon. He would end his service with the 2e Regiment de Grenadiers-à-Pied de la Garde Impériale, as a Sergent-chef, crippled by howitzer shots at the Battle of Vauchamps in February of 1814. $[firstName]'s Grandfather Leon $[lastName] would serve a Chasseur à pied in the disastrous Franco-Prussian war of 1870-1871.</p>

<p>By the outbreak of war $[name] leadership capabilities were known to his superiors and he would be soon promoted to Corporal . He was part of the 5th Army and the 44th Infantry Division when they went into action in the decisive defeat in the Battle of Charleroi on the 21st of August 1914. It was during this battle that $[lastName]'s platoon was almost wiped out by German machine-gun fire and $[firstName] was to distinguish himself by carrying his dying Sous-lieutenant out of the fighting. The battle had a deep affect on $[firstName] and it would result in his desire to escape the ground war. Because of his valorous actions in saving his Sous-Lieutenant his request for a transfer was approved and shortly after he was to head to flight training, away from the front line, but no less dangerous.</p>

<p>The proud military service of the $[lastName] family was a great influence on the life of $[firstName]. This service had always been of enlisted personnel with middle class origins that resulted in a passing down through the years of a disdain for the French Aristocracy. With the new fledgling pilot corps of the Service Aéronautique this was the chance for $[firstName] to add further annals to the history of the $[lastName] family. It was also a chance for him to win personal glory and recognition, and for the first time in his families history as a Commissioned Officer within the French Military. The chance to fly in the clean air above the battlegrounds of France is one that $[name] has embraced, leaving him with a burning desire to achieve victory in the sky. $[name] joined $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
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#105 Han

Han
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Posted 10 March 2011 - 14:37

Han, I'd like to make a correction to my French Traveler Biography…
In the first sentence, it reads "Frenchman $[name] from the time he was young, always sought out adventure."
Could you change it to "Since the time he was young, Frenchman $[name] always sought out adventure."
In english, the second way sounds much better.
Yes, offcourse, thank you for your care!

A Commonwealth Australian biography. Sheep rancher
Hope you like it.
<p>$[name] was born on $[birthDate] into a simple sheep ranching family near Perth, Australia. From an early age he was an adventurous lad and would head off into the interior with only his bush kettle and Aussie sheepdog in tow. One day a rather eccentric Irish gentleman, Winston Ginty, showed up on the Perth docks with a strange contraption made of sticks, wire, and canvas that soon was airborne and circling over the harbor. When $[firstName] heard he was looking for a bushguide he introduced himself and bought Ginty a pint of the local ale. They were soon fast friends. Little did $[firstName] know that he would be guiding Ginty into the outback for the first attempt at crossing Australia by air! However, the adventure didn’t last long and was lost to history when they crash landed on takeoff in a freak down draft. Ginty lost his left arm and only survived through $[firstName]’s quick action. Despite the bad luck and bruises $[firstName] was smitten by flying</p>
<p>Soon afterwards the Commonwealth of Australia was drawn into the Great European conflict. $[lastName] enlisted and embarked with the First Australian Imperial Force. While most of his unit spent their prolonged trans-ocean voyage on deck, he was fascinated by the ship’s big engines and pestered the chief engineer to explain everything. Showing a tremendous aptitude for anything mechanical, after arrival at Gallipoli he was sent to the repair shops where he had the chance opportunity to work on a damaged aeroplane engine, one of only a few in the whole theatre. Corporal $[lastName] delivered the repaired engine to the nearby reconnaissance unit and caught the eye of the adjutant who arranged a local transfer to the R.F.C. $[lastName] was one step closer to flying.</p>
<p>After evacuation from the Dardanelles, $[lastName] was sent for formal mechanics’ training and began servicing Be2’s in No.10 Squadron at St. Omer late in 1915. Some of the pilots would allow $[firstName] to come along on test flights of repaired aircraft. On one of these occasions they were surprised by a lone German Fokker far behind the lines. Fortunately the BE2 still had the observer’s Lewis gun mounted, so $[lastName] swung into action. After putting several bullets through their own tail planes he managed a lucky shot and holed the Fokker’s petrol tank, sending the German scurrying for his lines. $[lastName] received a promotion to Sergeant and a transfer to No.44 Observer Training School at Waddington, where he was one step closer to his goal.</p>
<p>While at No.44 $[firstName] became reacquainted with Winston Ginty, now a flight instructor, who took him up during spare time. Once again $[lastName] showed a natural talent for stick and rudder, but if he was going to become a pilot he needed to do something brash. He convinced the Training Squadron Commander of his worth by first repairing and then soloing in an old hangar queen. $[lastName] would become a pilot after all!</p>
<p>Once $[lastName]completed proper flight training he was posted to $[squad] in France. On $[startDate], $[startRank] $[name] crossed the front for the first time, and his adventurous spirit soared! <i>But will raw talent and sheer perseverance be enough?</i></p>
EDIT: for spelling. Thank you!
I haven't read any of the other posts/biographies, mostly because I do not want to be influenced by the style and what others are writing. It's very easy to "boiler plate" things like this, and then they're just repetitive.
I've taken what I hope is a simple narrative approach, providing hopefully just enough background details, justification, and conflict (conflict is important!) to flesh out the main character and keep it interesting, without writing a novel.
It ain't easy, and I hope these are enjoyable quick reads and will work for the task at hand.
Commonwealth Newfoundland, fisherman
<p>On $[birthDate] $[name] was brought into the world kicking and screaming at Pouch Cove, Newfoundland. Born to a traditional fishing family $[firstName] followed his father and took up the call of the sea, as well as his love of music and the ceilidh. After his father was swept overboard and lost in a storm, $[firstName] renounced his God and took up the call of the bottle. On the anniversary of his death while particularly intoxicated, $[lastName] took insult to a not so idle comment from one of the local constabulary. He made the offender take back his words the only way he knew how, with his fists. For striking an officer of the law $[name] was given the choice of prison or enlistment. He chose enlistment in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment.</p>
<p>In what seemed the blink of an eye, $[name] found himself in the hell of battle-torn Beaumont Hamel in July 1916, with many of his close comrades blown to pieces as they huddled in the trenches. Having never been denied the freedom of the sea, $[firstName] now was barred the ability to even see the horizon. His war was a hate-filled purgatory, with the Germans holding the key, or so it seemed to his tortured soul. When the call came for a volunteer for Иballoon duty’, $[lastName] took the opportunity to escape the trenches. </p>
<p>Soon enough he was in a basket at 4000 feet assisting the observer, Major Dutie of RFC No.1 Balloon Squadron. $[firstName]’s sea legs provided immunity to the balloon’s gyrations, and the Major was a kindly man, much like his father. As time passed the Major took on a mentoring role, and $[firstName] learned to love the sky as much as the sea. During the late summer of 1916 their balloon was aloft over the Somme, supporting the largest offensive yet staged on the Western Front. One overcast day the whole balloon crew was completely surprised when a German scout attacked from the clouds. They both jumped from the basket, but burning debris fell on Major Dutie’s parachute and he plummeted to his death as $[firstName] watched helplessly. There and then he vowed total revenge.</p>
<p>Very much to his surprise, a few days later $[firstName] discovered that the Major had pulled some strings and arranged a transfer for him to the Royal Flying Corps. Time again passed quickly at No.6 Flight Training School, and in what seemed a little more than it took to Иpay the devil’ of a ship, $[name] found himself promoted to $[startRank] in $[startDate] with $[squad] as a very green pilot. <i>However, this time he had a machine gun in hand, hate in his heart, and revenge raging in his soul!</i></p>
That is exelent! Thank you!

German Nobleman, Saxony.
<p>Born $[birthDate], $[name] would grow up on his familial estates in Saxony, during his upbringing $[lastName] would receive tutelage in the classical skills of the nobility: Riding, Hunting, Shooting and High society. Hunting and shooting for most of his young life would hone [lastName]'s marksmanship abilities to a very useful degree. The art of deflection shooting was virtually unknown in the early days of aerial combat and the leading of a bird in flight was to provide a valuable analogue to air to air shooting. These skills learned as part of his noble upbringing would later prove vital in the hellish crucible of the Great War.</p>
<p>Commissioned into the Koniglich Sachsisches 2. Ulanen-Regiment Nr. 18, $[lastName] would serve in 58th Infantry Division, formed in March 1915, the Division would fight in the Second Battle of Artois in May 1915, where much to his and his comrades chagrin the Ulanen-Regiment spent most of it's time reconnoitering and digging trenches along with their infantry comrades, far from the glorious cavalry charges imagined by the young noblemen. Upon seeing the first aircraft in the air flying above the battlefields $[lastName] began to believe his place was no longer as a cavalryman but as a flyer in this modern era.</p>
<p>It was whilst serving in his Uhlan regiment that $[name] would receive a wound from that most ancient of weapons, a lance. Despite the rapid decline of Cavalry in the Great War $[firstName] would still end up wounded (much to his frustration) in his first actual cavalry skirmish. Whilst on a mounted reconniasance mission $[lastName] and his Squadron would encounter an enemy cavalry patrol in a depression on a similar mission, spurring down the slope the two cavalry forces would clash briefly and the enemy troop was repulsed, in this engagment $[lastName] was struck and wounded in the shoulder by an enemy lance. During his time of recuperation $[lastName] arranged through his contacts a transfer to the Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. After training $[lastName] served as most German pilots; in two-seaters. There he flew vital photographic and artillery spotting missions.</p>
<p>Although pleased with his transfer to two seaters $[lastName] would be tantalized by the exploits of the early aces; the exploits of the famous Fokker scourge and the decorations and adulations it brought were strong and vivid in his mind. Application was made and thanks to his contacts and noble upbringing $[name] was soon approved and transferred to single-seat figher training. Now in the summer of 1916 in the skies above France $[lastName] began to experience the modern air combat, as a fighter pilot. $[name] joined $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
Very good, version vith corrections is used. Thnk you!

Ok here is the final version of the text. Thanks for the amendments :)
German Skilled Labourer
<p>A native of Schleswig-Holstein $[name] was born on $[birthDate]. Raised on the border of Germany and Denmark $[firstName] became a fluent speaker in both German and Danish. It was whilst serving an apprenticeship as a Carpenter that $[firstName] realised his further passion for engines and machinery. In his spare time he worked on his neighbours farm machinery and became an adept mechanic. The outbreak of the Great War meant that $[firstName], like many of his friends, enlisted and began service in the 163rd Schleswig-Holstein Infantry Regiment.</p>
<p>The Battle of Mons on 23 August 1914 was narrowly missed by the Regiment, as they were embarked on a 36 hour train ride to the battle area at that time. However the Regiment and $[firstName] would soon go into action at Mechelin and Leuven, after the regiment deployed south and fought on the Aisne, at Noyon and Roye. During his service as an Infantryman [firstName] was noted for his potential and promoted to Gefreiter. However soon after his promtion, whilst manning the line at Noyon $[lastName] was wounded by shrapnel and had to spend time recuperating at a field hospital in the rear. The wound proved more serious than first thought and $[firstName] ended up spending several months out of action</p>
<p>During his recovery time $[firstName] received a stroke of luck when the automobile of a former Uhlan officer, now serving in the air services, broke down near the hospital. $[firstName] successfully repaired it and, following a conversation with the officer, dispensation was given for him to join the fledgling Fliegertruppen des deutschen Kaiserreiches. Serving initially as a mechanic, where his skills with engines and carpentry where found to be invaluable $[name] soon realised that what he wanted more than anything was to fly. This initially proved problematic as his Commanding Officer saw the value in his skills as a ground crewman. Not to be dissuaded $[name] continued applying and eventually permission for flight training was given and $[firstName] commenced his flight training in August 1915. In early 1916 $[firstName] began serving in Aviatik two-seaters, flying reconnaissance missions. </p>
<p>The growing need for Jagdflieger and $[firstName]'s growing frustration with the role of an Artillery spotter and being the target of agressive attacks by enterprising Royal Flying Corps Scout pilots, resulted in an application, approval and transfer to single-seaters, for eventual posting to a fighter squadron. Following a further period of training $[name] would finally reach a fighter unit in the Summer of 1916. With his passion for machines and training $[name] is still sometimes found with the mechanics working on his own aircraft. However his passion for flying will soon bring him into contact with the enemy; for the first time on his own terms, as a Jagdflieger. $[name] then joined $[squad] on $[startdate].</p>
That is great, thank you!

How about this for a British commoner…
<p> $[name] was born into a large family in Lampeter, Wales, on $[birthdate]. As a young boy $[firstName] spent his free time roaming alone in the Teifi Valley, frequently journeying to the ancient gold mine at nearby Dolaucothi, from where he would hope to catch a glimpse of the magnificent red kites, that were near to extinction. $[firstName] was a dreamer, and never really fitted into school, preferring his own company. He left school at 13 and worked locally, running errands for the owner of a grocery shop in Lampeter, which allowed him to indulge his desire for a life outdoors. In his spare time, $[firstName] would often disappear into the countryside for hours on end, hunting rabbits with his father's shotgun</p>
<p> At the outbreak of the war, $[firstName] enlisted into the 2nd Battalion, Welsh Regiment, which was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division. The Division was one of the first to arrive in France, fighting at the Battle of Mons, and taking part in the retreat to the Marne, where the Germans were stopped. They then fought at the Aisne, and at Chivy, before being moved North to Ypres. Perhaps because of his hard upbringing in the Welsh countryside, $[firstName] coped well with the rigours of life in the infantry, and his natural self-reliance and hunting spirit led to him being well suited to the duties of a sniper.</p>
<p> $[firstName] began to gather quite a reputation in this role, often venturing into no man's land for protracted periods to hunt his quarry and he seldom returned back to the lines without having made a kill. In these early months of the war, however, $[firstName] enjoyed his role for a different reason - he could be the master of his own time, away from Sergeant Majors and, although he kept a trained sniper's eye out for trouble, he would also spend his time watching wildlife. As aircraft became a more common sight over the battlefield, $[firstName]'s thoughts often drifted back to the V-tailed red kites gracefully soaring over the valleys of his youth.</p>
<p>During the battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1915, and following the 2nd Welsh's stalled attack as part of the first wave, $[firstName] shared a shellhole with a Royal Flying Corps observer, whose craft had been downed by German AA fire. The pilot was also Welsh and from Llandovery, close to $[firstName]'s home, and in the time they spent together they talked of home and flying. Inspired by this, $[firstName] put in his transfer papers to the RFC almost as soon as he had regained his own trench line.</p>
<p> And so it was, that after training at the Central Flying School $[firstName] was posted to No2 Sqn, RFC, where he flew reconnaissance missions as an observer in BE-2s. However, $[firstName]'s single-mindedness and aggressive hunting instinct soon began to shine through again and on $[startDate] $[startRank] $[lastName] received orders to transfer to $[squad] to fly single-seater scouts, where he could soar, wheel and kill, like the red kites of his childhood.</p>
We have one GB commoner, let it be a second one. Thank you!

GB Commonwealth flier, Australia.
<p>$[name] was born on a small farm in Victoria, Australia near the town of Mildura, on the $[birthdate]. His father was a cattle grazer and owned the farm. He grew up making a five mile walk to the nearest school, $[firstname] was an adventurous and often unruly student. He went badly in his studies and could barely write his name when he left School. He left school as soon as he could and began working full time on his father's farm. He found the farm work even more boring then the school work, and left to find work in Ballarat. There he found work as a labourer. He lived in poorly built apartment on the edge of town for five years. Eventually he was promoted to a carter, but that as far as he rose, he found controlling the cart at first exciting, but it soon became monotonous. It was his job to cart the horse-droppings left on the streets everyday and take them to be put into fertiliser. In his free time $[firstname] courted a rich girl who he tried to take to the best venues with his meagre earnings and pretend to be a rich man about town. This all collapsed when she saw him one evening doing his work, realised she had been lied to and never spoke to him again.</p>
<p>War broke out not even a day later, and out of anger and grief went to enlist the moment he heard of it. $[firstname] joined the 7th battalion of the 2nd brigade, AIF, commanded by Colonel "Pompey" Elliot and was sent to Egypt for training. The British officers there disliked the weather and disliked the troops under their command, and disliked him most of all. Despite this he was promoted to Sergeant, and when he saw his first aeroplane flying overhead near Cairo, he fell in love. He went to his Captain, who refused yo transfer him. He then committed the grievous error of going over the Captain's head and went to Elliot, he was refused, and was told he was too good a sergeant. The Captain heard of it and he was surreptitiously demoted to Corporal. He continued to write sad love letters to the girl, but she did not reply to him and he gave up eventually, two days before they left for the Dardenelles.</p>
<p>The Battalion was amongst the first wave on the beach at Gallipoli, and he was mentioned in dispatches for leading a group of men against a machine gun post that had pinned down his Company, where he was recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal. $[firstname] continued to serve at Gallipoli until at Lone Pine, when he was shot in the leg and evacuated. the injury was bad enough that $[firstname] was taken out of the Battalion, it was then that he asked for again for a transfer to the RFC while in hospital. There followed an anxious month of waiting until it was this time accepted, and in September 1915 he was sent to France to train as a Mechanic. $[firstname] was still limping slightly from the wound. He was however quickly taken out at put into flight training. He went well in his learning and was promoted swiftly to $[startRank].</p>
Edit:I put in ranks for Australian ground units, voided I imagine when he joins the RFC, is that okay?
It may join RNAS too, but I'm think it's ok anyway.

With a whiff of cheese some French Biographies arrive. Actually hopefully I have managed to avoid any hilarious garlic munching stereotypes. Also for the record I certainly never stated i wanted my name in the Biography, all I said was 'are we going to be credited'
French Nobleman, Normandy.
<p>A privileged son of formerly exiled French nobility $[name] was born on $[birthDate] near Rouen, the historic medieval capital of Haute-Normandie, where he lived his childhood on the ancient family pastoral estates. Tracing their lineage back to the pre-revolutionary French nobility the $[lastName] family had encountered many changes since those early days. The young $[firstName] was a whimsical youth, not athletic or gifted at sport but possessing a keen, if easily distracted mind. He would dabble in many pursuits from riding, writing, shooting and art. Nothing would eventually end up maintaining his interest too long. A sense of wanderlust gripped the youth and he began to travel throughout France, where not unexpectedly he fell into the passionate embrace of wine, women and song. It was during these travels that he eventually found what he felt was his true calling, Aviation.</p>
<p>The family pastoral estates had been in the family name since the 1500's where the direct ancestor of $[firstName] had first settled, a Noblesse chevaleresque named Bertrand $[lastName] he had spent time as a Chevalier and had gained many laurels and wealth fighting the enemies of the French crown. Many years later in the dark days of the French Revolution the $[lastName] family was in great danger and like much of the French nobility had to flee to England. There they lived lives of hardship and exile for several generations. It was not until the collapse of the Second French Empire and the institution of the French Third republic that $[firstName]'s Grandfather Luc $[lastName] was to return to France and re-acquire the ancestral lands of the family. Through the efforts of Luc and his son Thierry the $[lastName] family was to expand their farming estates in Normandy, where Thierry would become very successful in developing the traditional family land into a highly efficient farming operation, with his wife $[name] bearing him a son $[name].</p>
<p>Whilst travelling through France $[firstName] was swept up in the passion for aviation sweeping France at the time. $[firstName] saw the demonstrations of Louis Bleriot and the other brave pioneers of flying and fell instantly in love with the dream of flying. It was the launching of Louis Bleriot successful crossing of the English Channel on the 25th of July 1909 that was to truly ignite $[firstName]'s desire to take to the air. With Bleriot's success and instant celebrity status $[firstName] became determined to be a pilot and emulate his hero. Aviation was not a cheap pursuit but with the assistance of his families successful farming estates he returned home the proud possessor of a Bleriot XI aircraft, where with boundless enthusiasm and more bravery than common sense $[firstName] taught himself to fly.</p>
<p>The coming of the Great War saw $[lastName] enlisting in the Service Aeronautique where his invaluable flying experience meant posting as a flight instructor. Keenly watching the news of the air-war $[firstName] would become further enraptured by the thought of aerial combat when hearing of the exploits of the pioneering French pilot Roland Garros, whose experiments with forward firing machine guns and deflectors greatly excited $[firstName]. It became his fervent desire to join these pioneering pilots in the romanticised duels of the flying Chevalier.</p>
<p>His repeated requests were denied, his valuable flying experience was considered vital for the training of new pilots, however nothing would dissuade him, eventually after nearly a year of persistent requests his Commanding Officer conceded and he was posted to the front, so now $[name] would join $[squad] on $[startdate] to realise his ambition and see for himself the true nature of aerial warfare.</p>
French Hereditary Military, Southern France.
<p>$[name] was born on $[birthDate] in the city of Montpellier in the Languedoc-Rousillion region of Southern France, where the $[lastName] family were to settle after France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. A family with a long military history young $[firstName] was raised by his caring mother and his military serving father, a former Sergent-chef in a Regiment d'Infantrie. The young $[firstName] was an avid sportsman and boxer in his young life, which made him a fit and strong young man. With his family history and his father's service $[firstName] had been encouraged and coached by his father for a career in the military. In 1911 with a desire to travel he would move to the city of Paris where the entire city was swept up in a fervour for aviation. This piqued the interest of $[firstName], and with the growing tensions in Europe he enlisted in the war to begin his service as a humble 'Poilu'.</p>
<p>The family traces it's military history reliably back to the American Revolutionary War of 1776. It is known from family records that Augustin $[lastName] served as a Sergent in the French forces that fought alongside the American revolutionaries in that conflict. As part of these forces he was with the Americans during the unsuccesful Siege of Savannah in Octover 1779, where he was killed by British millitia in an ill-advised assault upon the defences. He was survived by his wife and young son.</p>
<p>His son Daniau $[lastName] would participate in the French revolution, the overthrow of the French Aristocracy between 1789-1799. Daniau was to date the most militarily successful of the $[lastName] family serving in nearly all of the campaigns of the Emperor Napoleon. He would end his service with the 2e Regiment de Grenadiers-a-Pied de la Garde Imperiale, as a Sergent-chef, crippled by howitzer shots at the Battle of Vauchamps in February of 1814. $[firstName]'s Grandfather Leon $[lastName] would serve a Chasseur a pied in the disastrous Franco-Prussian war of 1870-1871.</p>
<p>By the outbreak of war $[name] leadership capabilities were known to his superiors and he would be soon promoted to Corporal . He was part of the 5th Army and the 44th Infantry Division when they went into action in the decisive defeat in the Battle of Charleroi on the 21st of August 1914. It was during this battle that $[lastName]'s platoon was almost wiped out by German machine-gun fire and $[firstName] was to distinguish himself by carrying his dying Sous-lieutenant out of the fighting. The battle had a deep affect on $[firstName] and it would result in his desire to escape the ground war. Because of his valorous actions in saving his Sous-Lieutenant his request for a transfer was approved and shortly after he was to head to flight training, away from the front line, but no less dangerous.</p>
<p>The proud military service of the $[lastName] family was a great influence on the life of $[firstName]. This service had always been of enlisted personnel with middle class origins that resulted in a passing down through the years of a disdain for the French Aristocracy. With the new fledgling pilot corps of the Service Aeronautique this was the chance for $[firstName] to add further annals to the history of the $[lastName] family. It was also a chance for him to win personal glory and recognition, and for the first time in his families history as a Commissioned Officer within the French Military. The chance to fly in the clean air above the battlegrounds of France is one that $[name] has embraced, leaving him with a burning desire to achieve victory in the sky. $[name] joined $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
Wow, that is cool! Thank you!

2 all who have helped with corrections - Thank you guys!
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#106 Zoring

Zoring
  • Posts: 850

Posted 10 March 2011 - 16:46

Han, I was thinking about this as I was writing, will the pilots need epilogues to go with their biography, after they get through the war presuming they survive I think players would want to know what happened to their pilot after the war, maybe a random selection of 3ish? epilogues of a paragraph length to go with each biography? You could have one for if they are the top scorer in the war, then two other random ones perhaps. Also perhaps if they were submitted to you via PM's so that people can't come in here and just read them.
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#107 MarcoRossolini

MarcoRossolini
  • Posts: 2991
  • LocationMelbourne, Australia

Posted 11 March 2011 - 05:13

Thx
I'm honoured that you have even thought of including it in the game :shock: :shock:
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#108 Skyburn

Skyburn
  • Posts: 109

Posted 12 March 2011 - 08:51

Here's an attempt for a Belgian Nobelman. It's a little short but english isn't my language. If you like it, use it, change it…some parts are based on a real bio (Baron Coppens)



<p> Baron $[name] was born on $[birthDate] in Wetteren, Belgium. His father was an artist, from him he learned to observe the world around him with a keen eye for detail.</p>
<p> He studied science at the university of Leuven. His experiments with hydrogen and electricity turned out to be a dangerous combination, afther an explosion in april 1911 he got expelled and had to return home for the rest of the year.</p>

<p> Like most Belgian men he would have to do millitary service, so In 1912 he was conscripted into the army and served with the Premiere Regiment Grenadiers. Afther his service had ended, he decided to stay in the military and signed up.</p>

<p> In 1914, following the German invasion of Belgium, Baron $[name] transferred to The Motor Machine Gun Corps. They swept through Flanders on their motorcycles carrying Vickers machine guns. Once the fighting on the Western Front had settled down in the stalemate of trench warfare
the opportunities for his unit to operate as a mobile force became limited. Eager to serve his country, Baron $[name] began looking around for other things to do…</p>


<p> On 10 September 1915, he signed up for flight training in the Compagnie des Aviateurs, but his request was rejected due to insufficiencies in Belgian training.
Baron $[name] subsequently took eight weeks leave to train at his own expense (along with 39 other Belgians) at a civilian flying school in Hendon, England, where he received lessons from, amongst others, Albert Ball. Two months later this was followed by further training in France at the Farman militairy aviation school in Étampes.</p>

<p> The 12th of december 1915 Baron $[name] received his licence.</p>

<p> He joined the 6e escadrille at Houthem in Belgium where he made reconnecance flights. He spend most of his free time in his hangar, working on his plane and learning from the mechanics</p>
<p> Baron $[name] got promoted to sergeant afther an escape from three enemy planes chasing him over the frontlines. Afther he landed he was amazed by the damage the plane had sustained by the bullets and he asked to be transferred to a fighter squad. His superiors recognised that he was an exellent pilot and he was assigned to single-seat fighters in the $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
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#109 SYN_Bandy

SYN_Bandy
  • Posts: 2599
  • LocationWishing I was in the La Cloche

Posted 13 March 2011 - 15:09

Is there a tag for nick name?
EDIT: I guess not. I could have sworn our pilot profiles had provision for a 'call-sign', or similar; maybe I'm confusing that with another sim… :?

The following 'Indochinese' biography was inspired by this real French Air Service picture below (although where I got it I cannot remember). Zoom in on the seated fellow. I've often wondered what the story is behind this gentleman, and why he was so obviously included in the picture. While they may be ground crew, it is simply fascinating to look at each face and wonder… If possible, please include images such as these in the GUI. It really helps to put you 'there'.
Image


'Indochinese' craftsman in French Air Service

<p>$[name] could not believe his luck! The Ancestors must be watching over him, for how did he ever get to sit in a flying machine, <i>let alone pilot one!</i> It all started in far away Indochine française where $[firstName] was born third son to a talented cabinetmaker on $[birthDate].  The family work ethic and attention to detail was instilled in each child at an early age. The family business made fine crafts from exotic Asian woods that were sought after by French importers. One of their best customers was Monsieur Arnaud, a wealthy gentleman who proposed that young $[firstName] could come to France as an apprentice in his furniture factory in return for a Western education. $[firstName]'s father agreed, and bid a tearful farewell.</p>

</p>When war broke out soon after their arrival in France, the Arnaud factory in Amiens was directed to retool and produce aircraft subassemblies. As the war dragged on they expanded and built complete aircraft under license to the Société Anonyme des Établissements Nieuport.</p>

<p>$[firstName] became proficient in not only the wooden components, but also rigging and other mechanical aspects, and was soon promoted to quality control. As each aircraft was completed he would check the control surface tolerances, start the engine, and bring it to the test pilots. Some of the aircraft were the N12 two-seater type, and occasionally the pilots would bring $[lastName] along for they thought he brought them luck. However he still felt like a piano tuner who could not, or was not, allowed to play the instruments. He loved the graceful lines, the smell of dope and castor oil, and the whole feel of these aircraft.</p>

<p>One day Gustave Delage, the chief designer for Nieuport, was inspecting the Arnaud factory when a German air raid occurred. The first bombs exploded at the end of a line of completed aircraft and started a large fire. $[lastName] jumped from cover, rallied a few others, and ran to the aircraft nearest the danger. There they started the engines to taxi them safely away from danger. With his adrenaline pumping wildly, $[firstName] pushed the throttle too far and his Nieuport became airborne briefly; it was exhilarating! He cut throttle and dropped safely down on the other side of the airfield.</p>

<p>With the all-clear sounded, M. Delage asked to speak with $[name], for he had witnessed the whole event. When asked why he had lead the rescue, $[lastName] said that they were his 'children', each had a personality. Delage was so impressed with his bravery that he asked whether $[lastName] would like to learn to fly. He eagerly accepted the offer, took flight training in his spare time, and was soon soaring above the clouds over France.</p>

<p>$[firstName] was overwhelmed by the generosity of Monsieurs Arnaund and Delage, the friendship of the test pilots and all he had learned. News of the terrible conflict at Verdun made him realize the sense of obligation he felt to his new host country. This inspired him to serve, but the only option available for a 'Chinaman' was the Foreign Legion, and they did not fly airplanes. While M. Delage was totally against it, he remembered the courage $[lastName] had shown, so he pulled whatever strings available and got him posted to the $[squad] of the French Air Service on $[startDate].</p>

<p>From the start it was an uphill battle for $[lastName]; most of the squadron members treated him like the other Chinese labour coolies brought to France. Fortunately, one of his former test pilot friends was now in the squadron, and he alone would fly with him. <i>His bravery was beyond doubt, but would $[firstName] be able to bring honor to his ancestors, family, and friends who showed such faith in him?</i></p>


EDITED: deleted nickname and N17 reference.
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#110 DidNotFinish

DidNotFinish
  • Posts: 4454

Posted 13 March 2011 - 22:56

$[name] tag instead of pilot Full name
$[firstName] tag instead of pilot First name
$[lastName] tag instead of pilot Last name
$[startRank] tag instead of pilot rank at the moment of career start
$[startRank] tag instead of pilot squad at the moment of career start
$[age] tag instead of pilot age at the moment of career start
$[startDate] tag instead of date at the moment of career start
$[birthdate] tag instead of pilot date of birth
<i>text</i> may be used for itallic text

Doesn't look like Han ever posted that a tag called $[nickName] was in use. How would it be used any way. In the Career mode I think there will be an option to make a first and last name but I haven't heard of a nickname option. Very nice bio though, very original. ;)
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#111 DidNotFinish

DidNotFinish
  • Posts: 4454

Posted 13 March 2011 - 23:00

@ Bandy,

Also, you make a reference to the N17. I think you may want to leave this a little more vague. Say someone started a N11 Career before the N17 saw service or if someone started a career in late 1918 after the N17 was decomissioned. I suggest re-writing it as simply saying "Nieuports" so that it could be referring to 10s, 11s, 12s, 17,s or so on. ;)
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#112 SYN_Bandy

SYN_Bandy
  • Posts: 2599
  • LocationWishing I was in the La Cloche

Posted 14 March 2011 - 11:55

Thanks for feedback and comments. Edited as suggested.

I know exactly what you mean about what if somebody starts earlier, or later… It is rather confusing when instructions are to truncate at the summer of 1916. At some point (we all hope!) the earlier plane set will be filled out either by the Dev's, or third party, making pre-summer 1916 campaigns possible.
It would be unfortunate if this was not factored in now…

Taubes and MS parasols dueling with pistols and shotguns! Just like "Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines". A great movie with fond memories from my youth…
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#113 Han

Han
  • Developer
  • Posts: 6670

Posted 14 March 2011 - 21:40

Here's an attempt for a Belgian Nobelman. It's a little short but english isn't my language. If you like it, use it, change it…some parts are based on a real bio (Baron Coppens)
<p> Baron $[name] was born on $[birthDate] in Wetteren, Belgium. His father was an artist, from him he learned to observe the world around him with a keen eye for detail.</p>
<p> He studied science at the university of Leuven. His experiments with hydrogen and electricity turned out to be a dangerous combination, afther an explosion in april 1911 he got expelled and had to return home for the rest of the year.</p>
<p> Like most Belgian men he would have to do millitary service, so In 1912 he was conscripted into the army and served with the Premiere Regiment Grenadiers. Afther his service had ended, he decided to stay in the military and signed up.</p>
<p> In 1914, following the German invasion of Belgium, Baron $[name] transferred to The Motor Machine Gun Corps. They swept through Flanders on their motorcycles carrying Vickers machine guns. Once the fighting on the Western Front had settled down in the stalemate of trench warfare
the opportunities for his unit to operate as a mobile force became limited. Eager to serve his country, Baron $[name] began looking around for other things to do…</p>
<p> On 10 September 1915, he signed up for flight training in the Compagnie des Aviateurs, but his request was rejected due to insufficiencies in Belgian training.
Baron $[name] subsequently took eight weeks leave to train at his own expense (along with 39 other Belgians) at a civilian flying school in Hendon, England, where he received lessons from, amongst others, Albert Ball. Two months later this was followed by further training in France at the Farman militairy aviation school in Étampes.</p>
<p> The 12th of december 1915 Baron $[name] received his licence.</p>
<p> He joined the 6e escadrille at Houthem in Belgium where he made reconnecance flights. He spend most of his free time in his hangar, working on his plane and learning from the mechanics</p>
<p> Baron $[name] got promoted to sergeant afther an escape from three enemy planes chasing him over the frontlines. Afther he landed he was amazed by the damage the plane had sustained by the bullets and he asked to be transferred to a fighter squad. His superiors recognised that he was an exellent pilot and he was assigned to single-seat fighters in the $[squad] on $[startdate]</p>
That is great! Thank you!

Is there a tag for nick name?
EDIT: I guess not. I could have sworn our pilot profiles had provision for a 'call-sign', or similar; maybe I'm confusing that with another sim… :?
The following 'Indochinese' biography was inspired by this real French Air Service picture below (although where I got it I cannot remember). Zoom in on the seated fellow. I've often wondered what the story is behind this gentleman, and why he was so obviously included in the picture. While they may be ground crew, it is simply fascinating to look at each face and wonder… If possible, please include images such as these in the GUI. It really helps to put you 'there'.
Image
'Indochinese' craftsman in French Air Service
<p>$[name] could not believe his luck! The Ancestors must be watching over him, for how did he ever get to sit in a flying machine, <i>let alone pilot one!</i> It all started in far away Indochine française where $[firstName] was born third son to a talented cabinetmaker on $[birthDate]. The family work ethic and attention to detail was instilled in each child at an early age. The family business made fine crafts from exotic Asian woods that were sought after by French importers. One of their best customers was Monsieur Arnaud, a wealthy gentleman who proposed that young $[firstName] could come to France as an apprentice in his furniture factory in return for a Western education. $[firstName]'s father agreed, and bid a tearful farewell.</p>
</p>When war broke out soon after their arrival in France, the Arnaud factory in Amiens was directed to retool and produce aircraft subassemblies. As the war dragged on they expanded and built complete aircraft under license to the Société Anonyme des Établissements Nieuport.</p>
<p>$[firstName] became proficient in not only the wooden components, but also rigging and other mechanical aspects, and was soon promoted to quality control. As each aircraft was completed he would check the control surface tolerances, start the engine, and bring it to the test pilots. Some of the aircraft were the N12 two-seater type, and occasionally the pilots would bring $[lastName] along for they thought he brought them luck. However he still felt like a piano tuner who could not, or was not, allowed to play the instruments. He loved the graceful lines, the smell of dope and castor oil, and the whole feel of these aircraft.</p>
<p>One day Gustave Delage, the chief designer for Nieuport, was inspecting the Arnaud factory when a German air raid occurred. The first bombs exploded at the end of a line of completed aircraft and started a large fire. $[lastName] jumped from cover, rallied a few others, and ran to the aircraft nearest the danger. There they started the engines to taxi them safely away from danger. With his adrenaline pumping wildly, $[firstName] pushed the throttle too far and his Nieuport became airborne briefly; it was exhilarating! He cut throttle and dropped safely down on the other side of the airfield.</p>
<p>With the all-clear sounded, M. Delage asked to speak with $[name], for he had witnessed the whole event. When asked why he had lead the rescue, $[lastName] said that they were his 'children', each had a personality. Delage was so impressed with his bravery that he asked whether $[lastName] would like to learn to fly. He eagerly accepted the offer, took flight training in his spare time, and was soon soaring above the clouds over France.</p>
<p>$[firstName] was overwhelmed by the generosity of Monsieurs Arnaund and Delage, the friendship of the test pilots and all he had learned. News of the terrible conflict at Verdun made him realize the sense of obligation he felt to his new host country. This inspired him to serve, but the only option available for a 'Chinaman' was the Foreign Legion, and they did not fly airplanes. While M. Delage was totally against it, he remembered the courage $[lastName] had shown, so he pulled whatever strings available and got him posted to the $[squad] of the French Air Service on $[startDate].</p>
<p>From the start it was an uphill battle for $[lastName]; most of the squadron members treated him like the other Chinese labour coolies brought to France. Fortunately, one of his former test pilot friends was now in the squadron, and he alone would fly with him. <i>His bravery was beyond doubt, but would $[firstName] be able to bring honor to his ancestors, family, and friends who showed such faith in him?</i></p>
EDITED: deleted nickname and N17 reference.
That one is unusual too, cool! Thank you!

List of biographies needed/done:
British nobleman biography - we have one (Tom-Cundall)
  • British commoner/laborer biography - we have one (WWBrian)
  • British hereditary military biography - we have one (ElwoodJCat)
  • British writer biography - we have one (BroadSide)
  • French nobleman biography - we have one (Zoring)
  • French commoner/laborer biography - we have one (FlatSpinMan)
  • French hereditary military biography - we have one (Zoring)
  • French traveler biography - we have one (AJ94CAP)
  • US nobleman biography - we have one (ElwoodJCat)
  • US laborer/farmer/miner/rancher biography - we have one (WWBrian)
  • US hereditary military biography - we have one (AJ94CAP)
  • US race car driver/celebrity/sports star biography - we have two (TheLawWon, LukeFF)
  • German nobleman biography - we have two (BroadSide, Zoring)
  • German employee biography - we have two (AJ94CAP, Zoring)
  • German hereditary military biography - we have one (Haldane)
  • German sportsman biography - we have two (Laser, FlatSpinMan)
  • WHATEVER you may imagine for GER/FRA/GBR/US air forces pilot
  • - now we have 13: Colonial German (FlatSpinMan), British scoundrel (FlatSpinMan), US old guy (BroadSide), Australian Aviator (Steviant), Italian Nobleman in French air forces (duz), Britain Commonwealth flier from Victoria (MarcoRossolini), British comes from the commonalty (Branwell), Britain Commonwealth fisherman from Newfoundland (Bandy), Britain Commonwealth sheep rancher from Perth (Bandy), Britain Commonwealth Reverend's son (Bandy), American Religious (WWBrian), Belgian Nobelman (Skyburn), 'Indochinese' craftsman (Bandy)
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    #114 Feathered_IV

    Feathered_IV
    • Posts: 1575

    Posted 14 March 2011 - 23:48

    Here is my first one. For the French Traveller category. (Edited 16th March)

    <p>$[name] was an African-American, born in North Carolina on $[birthDate]. His mother died during childbirth, and his father was killed in a farming accident when he was just three years old. He was raised by his grandmother, a former house slave of the Green Hill Plantation near the town of Ronda. She looked after him and took charge of his schooling, until her death in 1905.</p>

    <p>$[firstName] had grown to be strong willed and determined. Thanks to his grandmother, he was also articulate, well read, and keen to see the world. He saw no future in Carolina, and with nobody left to keep him there he soon headed North. He was fortunate to take a job as a steward aboard the trans-atlantic passenger steamer, SS St. Paul, which ran a regular service from New York to Cherbourg. Life aboard the St. Paul was a revelation for $[firstName], especially the homeward journeys. Passengers from Europe behaved far more differently towards him than the outward bound Americans. One especially was particularly kind. A regular passenger, a successful wine merchant by the name of Claude Boudin.</p>

    <p>Boudin spoke excellent english and often chided $[firstName] about how few opportunities existed for him in the United States. "Why not come to France?" he would say. "Ah, such a life you could have!"</p>

    <p>In November of 1908, as Boudin departed the ship in New York harbour, he handed $[lastName] a rolled up magazine. "I grow tired of speaking to you in english", he said with an air of exaggerated disdain. "Why not try to learn a few words, <i>au Francais</i>?" In surprise, he watched Boudin leave and disappear into the harbour throng. He unrolled the magazine and read the title… <i>La Revue de l'Aviation</i></p>

    <p>$[lastName] studied French with a will. Spurred on by the grainy images in the magazine, he strove to decipher the captions, and later the main body of the text. He watched the sea birds in the harbour and thought of flying. Soon he thought of little else. On 16th May 1910, he jumped ship at Cherbourg and took a train to Paris.</p>

    <p>$[name] worked many jobs and lived as frugally as he could. In 1912, with the money he'd saved (and a letter of introduction from M.Boudin) he entered the University of Paris to study engineering. When war broke out in 1914, $[lastName] was in the middle of his studies. Things did not go well for France, and in September the fate of Paris hung in the balance. $[firstName] was one of thousands of reservists and civilian volunteers who mobilised in defense of the city. In the First Battle of the Marne, he was wounded by shrapnel in the back, neck and legs and dragged from the field by two grim faced Poilu.</p>

    <p>Long months of recovery followed. $[lastName] was discharged from hospital in July 1915. Aviation was by then beginning to make it's mark and he immediately tried to enlist in the Armee de l'Air. He was to be disappointed however, as the selection staff pointed out that although his engineering background was desirable, he was not already in the armed forces and did not have at least two years of Foreign Legion service to his credit. The committee bid him good day. <i>Nous regrettons…</i> </p>

    <p>As he got up stiffly to leave, one of the officers asked him what was wrong with his back. $[lastName] told them of his time on the Marne, his wounding and his subsequent recovery. As he spoke, he became aware of a subtle change in the room. Even the sentry at the door seemed to stand a little straighter. After he finished there was a long pause. The officer coughed and consulted his papers. It seemed perhaps there might be an opening after all…</p>

    <p>$[name] undertook pilot training at Issoudun, where he was awarded his wings on 15 February 1916. He flew Morane Parasols in the Verdun sector, where he first carried out reconnaissance and artillery spotting duties. Ranging for the artillery was grim work, and made his own wounds ache with more than just the cold. During this time he made several applications for transfer to a scout unit.

    <p>On $[startdate], $[name] received his wish and was posted to $[squad] </p>

    Inspired by Eugene Bullard and Ahmet Ali. Thanks for reading! ;)
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    #115 Feathered_IV

    Feathered_IV
    • Posts: 1575

    Posted 15 March 2011 - 05:44

    I enjoyed that Bandy. If I can make a suggestion though. In Australia the phrase "Rancher" is not used. They are called Sheep Stations. A sheep station is run by a grazier, and a worker there is called a station hand. Oh, and a sheep dog is often a blue heeler or a kelpie. ;)

    A Commonwealth Australian biography. Sheep rancher
    Hope you like it.

    <p>$[name] was born on $[birthDate] into a simple sheep ranching family near Perth, Australia. From an early age he was an adventurous lad and would head off into the interior with only his bush kettle and Aussie sheepdog in tow. One day a rather eccentric Irish gentleman, Winston Ginty, showed up on the Perth docks with a strange contraption made of sticks, wire, and canvas that soon was airborne and circling over the harbor. When $[firstName] heard he was looking for a bushguide he introduced himself and bought Ginty a pint of the local ale. They were soon fast friends. Little did $[firstName] know that he would be guiding Ginty into the outback for the first attempt at crossing Australia by air! However, the adventure didn’t last long and was lost to history when they crash landed on takeoff in a freak down draft. Ginty lost his left arm and only survived through $[firstName]’s quick action. Despite the bad luck and bruises $[firstName] was smitten by flying</p>

    <p>Soon afterwards the Commonwealth of Australia was drawn into the Great European conflict. $[lastName] enlisted and embarked with the First Australian Imperial Force. While most of his unit spent their prolonged trans-ocean voyage on deck, he was fascinated by the ship’s big engines and pestered the chief engineer to explain everything. Showing a tremendous aptitude for anything mechanical, after arrival at Gallipoli he was sent to the repair shops where he had the chance opportunity to work on a damaged aeroplane engine, one of only a few in the whole theatre. Corporal $[lastName] delivered the repaired engine to the nearby reconnaissance unit and caught the eye of the adjutant who arranged a local transfer to the R.F.C. $[lastName] was one step closer to flying.</p>

    <p>After evacuation from the Dardanelles, $[lastName] was sent for formal mechanics’ training and began servicing Be2’s in No.10 Squadron at St. Omer late in 1915. Some of the pilots would allow $[firstName] to come along on test flights of repaired aircraft. On one of these occasions they were surprised by a lone German Fokker far behind the lines. Fortunately the BE2 still had the observer’s Lewis gun mounted, so $[lastName] swung into action. After putting several bullets through their own tail planes he managed a lucky shot and holed the Fokker’s petrol tank, sending the German scurrying for his lines. $[lastName] received a promotion to Sergeant and a transfer to No.44 Observer Training School at Waddington, where he was one step closer to his goal.</p>

    <p>While at No.44 $[firstName] became reacquainted with Winston Ginty, now a flight instructor, who took him up during spare time. Once again $[lastName] showed a natural talent for stick and rudder, but if he was going to become a pilot he needed to do something brash. He convinced the Training Squadron Commander of his worth by first repairing and then soloing in an old hangar queen. $[lastName] would become a pilot after all!</p>

    <p>Once $[lastName]completed proper flight training he was posted to $[squad] in France. On $[startDate], $[startRank] $[name] crossed the front for the first time, and his adventurous spirit soared! <i>But will raw talent and sheer perseverance be enough?</i></p>


    EDIT: for spelling. Thank you!

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    #116 SYN_Bandy

    SYN_Bandy
    • Posts: 2599
    • LocationWishing I was in the La Cloche

    Posted 15 March 2011 - 11:48

    Thanks for tips Feathered.
    You know I even googled 'Aussie sheep dog' because I knew there was another name for them (I saw lots of them on the Navajo Rez while working there, beautiful dogs, lots of personality!) but guess I didn't get the right sites.

    Hopefully Han hasn't already grabbed them for use…
    Nota Bene: I have edited my Australian bio to include the excellent suggestions above, please use that version now if possible, thank you!

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    #117 SYN_Bandy

    SYN_Bandy
    • Posts: 2599
    • LocationWishing I was in the La Cloche

    Posted 15 March 2011 - 17:25

    @ Feathered_IV
    Enjoyed your bio above as well! I was going to try my hand at that perspective too, but have the traveler go through Ethiopia first to train pilots for the Emperor, a story inspired by an African-American barnstormer Hubert Julian in the 1930's. But never got around to it…

    an edit for you:
    2nd para "revelaion"

    I noticed you just use the $[name] tag throughout your text. Try in your head to insert a full name as you re-read the bio. It doesn't feel right. Then pick out the spots where using $[firstName] and $[lastName] would be more appropriate, such as a formal encounter use $[lastName], and more personal moments use $[firstName]. It adds a natural touch to the storyline.
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    #118 Feathered_IV

    Feathered_IV
    • Posts: 1575

    Posted 16 March 2011 - 00:43

    Thanks for such excellent feedback. To be honest I was using the first tutorial text as reference that I'd pasted into a txt file. Didn't realise that first and last names were available separately (was bothering me too). I'll fix it up this evening.
    I've got two more on the way. One from an Australian mechanic, based on Horace Miller and another for a former member of the East Yorkshire Rifles.
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    #119 SYN_Bandy

    SYN_Bandy
    • Posts: 2599
    • LocationWishing I was in the La Cloche

    Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:00

    Good show!

    Also keep in mind we need more French Air Service bios.
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    #120 Feathered_IV

    Feathered_IV
    • Posts: 1575

    Posted 16 March 2011 - 12:01

    Changed the Bio above for typos, italics, tags and hopefully verbosity. :oops:

    Added a little more detail in the selection stage and a motive for leaving recon unit. Tried to keep a degree of brevity though. Starting to feel like I know the guy…!
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