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Complete List of all WWI Aircraft


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#1 PourLeMerite

PourLeMerite
  • Posts: 82

Posted 16 January 2011 - 07:00

Apparently there were over 100 different aircraft types seeing combat in WWI.

This list is a compilation of nearly all of them (as far as I know )including the ones we know about ingame.
I have started a new thread so that the devs can come straight to it instead of scrolling through the other thread.


AEG C.IV
The C.IV was a twin-seat biplane aircraft produced by the German firm of Allgemeine Elektrizitats-Gesellschaft

1916
AEG G.IV
The AEG G.IV was another successful product of the Allgemeine Elektritzitats Gesellschaft aircraft corporation

1916
Aeromarine 39
The Aeromarine 39 was a two-seat plane for land-based or seaplane training ordered by the US Navy in 1917.

1916
Aeromarine 40
The Aeromarine Model 40 (or simply "Aeromarine 40") was a two-seat floatplane trainer aircraft serving the United States Navy

1918
Aerowerke Gustav Otto AGO C.II
The C.II was the product of the Aerowerke Gustav Otto aircraft firm, abbreviated as AGO in the designation

1915
Airco DH.2
Geoffrey de Havilland was hired by the Airco firm in June of 1914 as lead designer and quickly lent his design talents to develop the pusher

1915
Airco DH.4
With production numbering over 6,000 total units, the Airco / de Havilland DH.4 was another one of Geoffrey de Havilland's planes

1917
Airco DH.5
With the view afforded the pilots of the DH.2, famed aircraft designer Geoffrey de Havilland set out to create a similar plane

1917
Airco DH.9
The AirCo / de Havilland DH.9 was a further revision of the DH.4 bomber.

1917
Albatros B.II
The Albatros B.II was a reconnaissance biplane used in the early years

1914
Albatros C.I
The Albatros C.I series of aircraft was the next evolution in the brand's reconnaissance aircraft line.

1915
Albatros C.III
Continuing in the long line of short-term reconnaissance biplane designs

1915
Albatros C.V
The Albatros C.V can, in some ways, be approached as a step backwards in the progression of the C-series as a whole.

1916
Albatros C.X
The Albatros production of the C.X model continued the firm's commitment to producing capable reconnaissance biplane aircraft

1917
Albatros D.I
The Albatros series of aircraft is a good study in how aircraft design evolved throughout World War One.

1916
Albatros D.II
The Albatros D.II became a further development of the successful Albatros D.I series.

1916
Albatros D.III

1917
Albatros D.V
The Albatros D.V series is often regarded as the best of the bunch in regards to the preceding D.I, D.II and the D.III models.

1917
Albatros D.Va
The Albatros D.Va was a further development in the D seriess

1917
Albatros J.I
The Albatros J.I was conceived of as a dedicated ground attack aircraft for use in the "infantry close-support role" during WWI

1917
Ansaldo A 1 Balilla (Hunter)
The Ansaldo A 1 Balilla ("Hunter") was the first aircraft fighter design of Italian origins

1918
Armstrong Whitworth FK.8
The Armstrong Whitworth FK.8 model series was an aircraft conceived of by aircraft designer Frederick Koolhoven

1917
Aviatik B.I
The Aviatik B.I series handled reconnaissance duties for Germany in the early years of the war

1914
Aviatik C.I
Aviatik (Automobil und Aviatikwerke) of Germany was already involved in aircraft designs from the outset of the war

1915
Aviatik D.I (Berg D.I)
The Aviatik D.I served the Austro-Hungarian Empire as a fighter and reconnaissance escort through the final years of WWI

1917
Avro 504
Without knowing it from the outset, the Avro Type 504 series of aircraft would become one of the most produced and influential planers of WWI

1913
Avro 529

1917
Beardmore WB III / SB 3
The Beardmore WB III was nothing more than a highly-modified, navalized version of the successful land-based Sopwith Pup

1917
Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo
The Kangaroo was the product of the Blackburn Aeroplane and Motor Company, Limited.

1918
Bleriot XI
The Bleriot XI was one of the first notable monoplanes to achieve any level of fame.

1909
Breguet Br.M5
The Breguet Br.M5 series of biplane bomber was developed from the Breguet Br.M4. The Br.M5 was operated by a crew of two

1915
Breguet Bre.14
French aviation design triumphed with the arrival of the Breguet Bre.14 series (sometimes written as Breguet Br.XIV).

1917
Bristol F.2
The Bristol F.2 fighter series operated throughout the British Empire for decades, serving through World War 1

1917
Bristol Scout

1914
Caproni Ca.1
Italian Bomber design

1915
Caproni Ca.3
The Caproni Ca.36 represented the definitive model in the C-bomber series debuted in 1914 as the C.31

1917
Caudron G.4
The Caudron G.4 series was a twin-engine bomber platform introduced in the early years of World War 1 by the French

1915
Caudron R.11
The Caudron R.11 was initially intended as a reconnaissance platform for the French Air Force

1918
DFW C.V
The DFW C.V series of biplane aircraft was of German design in World War 1.

1916
Dorand Ar

1917
Farman MF.11 Shorthorn
The Farman MF.11 "Shorthorn" was a development of French aeronautical engineering and was essentially an early-war biplane

1914
Felixstowe F.5
The Felixstowe F.5 series originated in the United Kingdom as a militarized flying boat in the last year of World War 1

1917
Fokker D.VII
The Fokker Dr.VII is now regarded as the best German fighter of the First World War

1918
Fokker D.VIII
The Fokker D.VIII was a monoplane design and is regarded as one of the best fighters produced by the Germans

1918
Fokker Dr.I (Dreidecker) Triplane
The Fokker Dr.I ("Dr" for "Dreidecker" meaning "triplane") series is most closely associated with Manfred von Richthofen

1917
Fokker E (Eindecker) Monoplane

1915
Friedrichshafen G.III
The Friedrichshafen G.III was a medium bi-plane class bomber utilized by the German Empire in World War 1

1917
Gotha G.IV

1916
Gotha G.V

1917
Halberstadt CL.IV
The CL.IV was a further development of the CL.II design, both aircraft a product of Halberstadt Flugzeugwerke of Germany.

1918
Handley Page H.P. O/400
The O/400 model series by Handley Page aircraft firm was the principle heavy bomber of the RAF by the end of the First World

1918
Hanriot HD.1

1916
Hansa-Brandenburg B.I (Type D/FD)
Ernst Heinkel - whose German firm Heinkel would gain some level of notoriety in World War 2 - designed a series of reconnaissance planes in WWI

1914
Hansa-Brandenburg C.I (Type LDD)
The Hansa-Brandenburg C.I was a two-seat reconnaissance aircraft seeing action with the Austro-Hungarian Empire

1916
Hansa-Brandenburg D.I (Type KD)
The D.I was another of Ernst Heinkel's aircraft designs for the Hansa-Brandenburg firm

1916
Hansa-Brandenburg W.12
The Hansa-Brandenburg W.12 was a two-seat floatplane fighter seaplane design serving the German Empire

1917
Junkers CL.I
The Junkers CL.I was a break-through aircraft design produced in limited quantities in the final year of WWI

1918
Lloyd C.II
The Lloyd C.II was a reconnaissance biplane fielded by the Austro-Hungarian Empire in WWI

1915
Lohner B.VII
The Lohner B.VII was a two-seat reconnaissance aircraft produced by and for the Austro-Hungarian Empire during World War 1.

1915
Lohner C.I
The Lohner C.I was nothing more than the armed version of the two-seat Lohner B.VII reconnaissance aircraft

1916
LVG C.II
The LVG C.II was a limited-production reconnaissance scout plane utilized by the German Empire during World War 1.

1915
LVG C.V
The LVG C.V was a general-purpose, two-seat reconnaissance aircraft utilized by the German air service in World War 1.

1917
LVG C.VI
The LVG C.VI became one of the final German two-seat aircraft to see quantitative production in World War 1

1918
Martin MB-1 / Glenn Martin Bomber
The Martin MB-1 (also known as the "Glenn Martin Bomber") became the first American-designed heavy bomber type to be purchased by the British

1918
Martinsyde F.4 Buzzard
The Martinsyde F.4 "Buzzard" was a biplane aircraft appearing in the late stages of World War 1

1915
Morane-Saulnier Type N
The Moraine-Saulnier Type N (or simply "Moraine-Saulnier N") was a French fighter aircraft of the First World War.

1915
Nieuport Nie.11 (Bebe)
The Nieuport 11 "Bebe"or "Baby" - officially as the Nieuport 11 C1

1915
Nieuport Nie.17
The Nieuport 17series of aircraft was the weapon of choice for World War One aces

1916
Nieuport Nie.27
The Nieuport Nie.27 (or simply Nieuport 27) was designed by Gustave Delage and became an advanced trainer

1917
Nieuport Nie.28
The French-built Nieuport 28 fighter was the third of the successful trilogy of "Nieuport Fighting Scouts"

1917
Pfalz D.III
The Pfalz D.III was an exceptional aircraft produced in large numbers by Bavaria for Bavarian forces

1917
Phonix C.I
The Phonix C.I was a rather simplistic two-seat armed reconnaissance fighter utilized by the Austro-Hungarian Empire during WWI

1917
Phonix D (Series)
The Phonix D.I was a single-seat fighter platform developed and produced by the Phonix Flugzeug-Werke firm in Germany.

1917
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2
The F.E.2 series of aircraft were produced by the Royal Aircraft Factory and had their origins in the F.E.1, a 1910 design

1915
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8
The Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8 ("F.E." for "Fighter Experimental") was developed in 1915

1916
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5
The Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 "S.E." for "Scout Experimental Mk5"

1917
Short Type 184
This was a British two-seat reconnaissance, bombing and torpedo carrying folder seaplane designed by Short Brothers.

1915
Siemens-Schuckert D.I
Siemens-Schuckert D.I aircraft were in fact reverse-engineered copies of the French-made Nieuport 11.

1916
Siemens-Schuckert D.III
The Siemens-Schuckert D series of fighters evolved from captured French-made Nieuport 11 aircraft.

1917
Siemens-Schuckert D.IV
The Siemens-Schuckert D.IV was a further development of the D-series brand, itself a copy of the spectacular French Nieuport

1918
Sikorsky Ilya Mourometz (Series)
The Sikorsky Ilya Mourometz series of aircraft were the world's first four-engine bombers in operational service.

1915
Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter
The Sopwith 1-1/2 (one and one half) Strutter was a successful aircraft design fielded in the First World War.

1916
Sopwith Camel
Though the Sopwith Camel, the official designation being Sopwith Biplane F.1

1917
Sopwith Dolphin
The Sopwith Dolphin was yet another fighter design in the long line of Thomas Sopwith production aircraft during World War 1

1917
Sopwith Pup
The Sopwith Pup appeared in 1916 at a time when the Allies were coming up against what would be known as the "Fokker Scourge"

1916
Sopwith Snipe
The Sopwith Snipe took all of the components that had made the Sopwith Camel a legend in the middle years of World War 1

1917
Sopwith Triplane
The Sopwith Triplane was dubbed the "Triplehound" by her pilots

1916
SPAD S.VII (S.7)
The SPAD S.VII (or S.7) became one of France's best fighter designs during World War 1.

1916
SPAD S.XII (S.12)

1917
SPAD S.XIII (S.13)
The SPAD S.XIII (S.13) was a further development of the successful SPAD S.VII (S.7) design.

1917
Standard J-1
The Standard J-1 appeared in the First World War and served the United States Army Air Service in the role of trainer.

1917
Ufag C.I
The Ufag C.I was a two-seat, single-engine biplane fighter serving the Austro-Hungarian Empire air services.

1918
Vickers FB.5
The FB.5 (also known as the "Gunbus") was of a biplane type design for the scouting role.

1915
Vickers Vimy

1918-19
Voisin Type 5
The French Voisin Type 5 bomber was developed from the proven Voisin III series

1915
Vought VE-7 Bluebird
In 1917 Mr. Birdseye B. Lewis formed an aircraft business with the Vought group, becoming the Lewis & Vought Corporation

1917
Zeppelin-Staaken R.VI

Others planes added by the community…

Etrich Taube
Germany, 1914: recon plane, occasionaly equipped with small bombs.

Farman mod. 1914
France, 1914: recon, patrol (Royal Navy), bomber plane.

Caudron G.3
France, 1914: recon, artillery fire observation.

Voisin L
France, 1914: recon, artillery fire observation, bomber.

Lohner L
Austria, 1914: idro employed as recon and bomber plane.

Brandenburg C-1
Germany-Austria, 1916: recon, bomber.
Developed by the German Industry HBF over a projet of Ernst Heinkel was used by Austria.

SVA
Italy, 1917: recon, armed recon, bomber.

Curtiss NC-H aka Idro Curtiss
USA, 1914: used by Royal Navy as patrol, recon idro-plane
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#2 PourLeMerite

PourLeMerite
  • Posts: 82

Posted 16 January 2011 - 07:14

I did have the URL with photos of each plane too, I will post it when I can remember it, if you wannit as its not in my favorites. The descriptions of the planes were with the dl, not mine lol

I have a URL of every automobile ever made too, if anyones interested I'll post it up.
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#3 lef64

lef64
  • Posts: 285

Posted 21 January 2011 - 13:35

I did have the URL with photos of each plane too, I will post it when I can remember it, if you wannit as its not in my favorites. The descriptions of the planes were with the dl, not mine lol

I have a URL of every automobile ever made too, if anyones interested I'll post it up.

Great job!
I have few more ones you could add to the list:


Etrich Taube
Germany, 1914: recon plane, occasionaly equipped with small bombs.

Farman mod. 1914
France, 1914: recon, patrol (Royal Navy), bomber plane.

Caudron G.3
France, 1914: recon, artillery fire observation.

Voisin L
France, 1914: recon, artillery fire observation, bomber.

Lohner L
Austria, 1914: idro employed as recon and bomber plane.

Brandenburg C-1
Germany-Austria, 1916: recon, bomber.
Developed by the German Industry HBF over a projet of Ernst Heinkel was used by Austria.

SVA
Italy, 1917: recon, armed recon, bomber.

Curtiss NC-H aka Idro Curtiss
USA, 1914: used by Royal Navy as patrol, recon idro-plane.




Morane-Saulnier Type N
Already in your list.
The correct operative life was 1915-16 on the Western Front.
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#4 PourLeMerite

PourLeMerite
  • Posts: 82

Posted 24 January 2011 - 16:43

Great job!
I have few more ones you could add to the list….

You did a great job adding those planes, although, I had a sneaky suspicion that I had not got all of them but after searching for a while I still found no more..so yeah…good job with those others !

Duly added to the list at bottom under added by community…
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#5 O_WolfPac

O_WolfPac
  • Posts: 1294

Posted 24 January 2011 - 21:19

The Hanriot HD1
3 versions , Italian with different gun locations and engine ,compared to the French/Belguim style also ,some Float plane version were made some of these float planes was ordered by USA and shipped over , i think this was to do tests for carrier landing operations as the first aircraft carrier-ships, the plane did not take off or land on the ship

Also

Hanriot HD.2
3 versions , italian and belguim used different engines again and locations of guns , plus a Float plane version again.
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#6 O_WolfPac

O_WolfPac
  • Posts: 1294

Posted 24 January 2011 - 21:59

Hello PourLeMerite and lef64

I do not know if you have seen this post but i do think you would enjoy being involved in a project that is connected to the same topic.

Please look and read the following post by Jason
Project #2 - List of all Operational Aircraft in WWI

It would be good to see your input added , and i think you can help a project take flight :)

Best regards
Tony
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#7 No48_Runner

No48_Runner
  • Posts: 101

Posted 27 March 2011 - 23:50

Found this:
SOPWITH TABLOID

Introduced toward the end of 1913, the Sopwith Tabloid won the Schneider Trophy at Monaco in 1914. An unarmed single-seater, it was one of the first British biplanes to be used in combat. One Tabloid pilot succeeded in driving down a German plane by circling it and throwing steel darts at it. On the afternoon of 9 October 1914, in the first successful bombing mission of the war, the Royal Naval Air Service sent two Tabloids to attack the Zeppelin sheds at Dusseldorf and Cologne. Only one of them reached its target but Zeppelin Z-9 was destroyed in its shed at Dusseldorf when the Tabloid pilot released two 20 pound bombs from a height of about 600 feet.

Attached File  sopwith_tabloid.jpg   16.32KB   5369 downloads

And here is the resource that I got it from:
Sopwith Tabloid
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#8 MortiferusRosa

MortiferusRosa
  • Posts: 89

Posted 19 April 2011 - 17:47

I noticed that the Neuport 24 was not included. Although only a few squadrons (Esc. 65 for example) ever had it and it was only for a short while, it did appear around September of 1917. Like all the other Neuports of its class it was highly maneuverable but not durable.

Edit: You also have some dates wrong. The Fokker E monoplane was out in 1916 not 1917. You also have the Gotha G.IV coming out after the G.V
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#9 MattM

MattM
  • Posts: 2595

Posted 25 April 2011 - 14:08

Dates for the Sopwith Pup, Sopwith Camel, Sopwith Snipe, Nieuport 17, SE5a, Albatros D.I, Fokker D.VII, Fokker DR.I are off too. I only looked over it once, i guess those are not the only planes that have wrong dates. All Rumpler, Rolands and most Pfalz and Handley-Page types are missing.
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#10 Monk007

Monk007
  • Posts: 1

Posted 25 June 2013 - 13:03

List from german Aircrafts + Pics

http://www.frontflie.../9flugzeug.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.frontflie.../9flugzeug.html
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#11 Dr.Zebra

Dr.Zebra
  • Posts: 2663

Posted 02 July 2013 - 15:19

still lots n lots of planes missing. Did anyone mention the german early war mars-aircraft-factory?
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#12 Emmer

Emmer
  • Posts: 143

Posted 07 December 2013 - 20:01

Found these links at the Wikipedia:

Entente list:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_aircraft_of_Entente_Powers_in_WWI


Central Powers:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_aircraft_of_Central_Powers_in_WWI

Hope this will add some more aircraft to the list………. 8-)
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#13 Pursuivant

Pursuivant
  • Posts: 24

Posted 09 December 2014 - 17:55

This site seems very comprehensive

http://flyingmachines.ru/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://flyingmachines.ru/index.htm

The trick with WW1 aircraft is to determine the varieties which saw service in significant numbers on the Western Front. Unlike WW2, production figures have been lost for many manufacturers, especially for early war planes, and many records about which squadron was equipped with a particular plane have also been lost.

Also, a few aircraft were deemed unsuitable for service on the Western Front (e.g., Bristol M.1 Scout, Martinsyde G100 "Elephant", BE12) and were shuffled off to other theaters. That means that even though they count as being "production" types, they shouldn't appear on any current maps.
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#14 FitzD7

FitzD7
  • Posts: 59

Posted 07 January 2015 - 19:01

I would list the Airco DH-9A, if it already hasn't been included.

Saw the DH-9, but the 9A was quite a different aeroplane, with a "real" engine powering it.
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