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Assist Developer with New Career Mode (Articles)


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#81 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 22 September 2010 - 19:31

Han: for the 23rd April 1918 (Richthofen Killed) we might as well use the 2 (real) fake headlines:

Besieged in Finland

&

Germans Keeping Russian Prisoners
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#82 Han

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 09:58

2 Tom-Cundall, SYN_Vander:
Thank you guys! Your work was implemented.

Someone else will take a part?

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#83 Han

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 12:30

You may to look at formatted files of your current current progress in first post of the thread, in attachment:

WW1westeuro1916-1918.zip

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#84 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 13:10

Cheers Han - I'll do another couple of dates tonight.

If anyone else wants to research potential headlines and post them on here or PM me then I'll write the articles (and I'm sure HotTom will get involved too) :)
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#85 hq_Jorri

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 13:56

I'll see if I can find some potential headlines on the U-boat war.
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#86 =J99=Sizzlorr

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 14:06

I will try to find some headers for fake articles to those dates. I first try to complete the dates which have articles already that something can be finished.
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#87 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 14:29

If you're searching for fake headlines list 4 possibilities for each date because one of us may pick it up and run with it as a full or secondary article.
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#88 =J99=Sizzlorr

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 14:32

If you're searching for fake headlines list 4 possibilities for each date because one of us may pick it up and run with it as a full or secondary article.

Roger that Tom!
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#89 HotTom

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 16:08

I've been really jammed for time this week.

Plan to jump in next week.

Han or T-C, If you give me some specific assignments, I'll be glad to get to work on them starting Monday.

Also, my offer to edit any and all completed work (doesn't mean there are any mistakes but no writing that hasn't been edited by at least one other person ever should be published IMO) remains open.

Just point to where you can use me.

HT
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#90 Han

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 20:30

Ok guys, I'm standing by.

Also, my offer to edit any and all completed work (doesn't mean there are any mistakes but no writing that hasn't been edited by at least one other person ever should be published IMO) remains open.
It's allready posted, I've pointed that:
Re: Assist Developer with New Career Mode (Articles)

Just point to where you can use me.
HT
Just in first post in the thread for newspapers list (I'm keeping work progress updated there)
Choose any required 2-week period (from required newspaper to provious one), point it here that you have taken it in work and do it - all is simple. Like other guys do it here. This is most required help.

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#91 sturmkraehe

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 20:53

I'll do some work on weekends as during week I have too little time (full time working :( )
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#92 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 11:41

24th September 1917


German Ace Voss Killed

The German Ace Werner Voss was killed yesterday after an heroic fight against overwhelming odds. Voss who, has been likened to a German Albert Ball, was a skilled fighter and quite a large personality, he always flew and fought in a silk shirt so that, if captured, he could “look his best for the ladies”

Whilst flying near Ypres on the 23rd of September Voss’ moustachioed Fokker Triplane was attacked by seven SE5As flown by the veteran pilots of 56 Squadron RFC. Led by British ace James McCudden the SE5s dived to engage the lone German. Voss’ manoeuvres were so quick and skilled that according to the British pilots involved he appeared to be shooting at all seven of them at once. The fight which lasted ten minutes was ferocious and at one point Voss was at the apex of the fire of five machines, 10 machine guns, but none of them were able to critically hit his machine.

The heroic German pilot was able to force down two of the British machines before, as he was engaging another, the young British pilot Arthur Rhys-Davies – who is hoping to take a place at Balliol College, Oxford after the war- was able to fire into his plane from behind. Rhys-Dvies continued firing as he passed the stricken Triplane in a dive and McCudden saw Voss’ machine hit the ground and disintegrate, “It seemed to me that it literally turned to powder” he reported after the engagement.

At the time of his death Voss, who flew for Manfred von Richtofen’s “Flying Circus” , had 48 confirmed victories.

Hubert Charles of 56 Squadron said “It was a wonderful fight by a wonderful fighter pilot” and reported that Keith Muspratt of the same squadron said “The chap they’d fought put up the finest fight he’d ever seen anywhere”

The following is an extract from the 56 Squadron combat report:

"Capt. J. McCudden, No. 56 Squadron saw a S.E.5a fighting a triplane, so with others dived at it, and for the next ten minutes the enemy triplane fought the five S.E.5s with great skill and determination. Eventually, however, it was destroyed by 2nd-Lieut. Rhys Davids of the same squadron, who had previously driven down a two-seater. . .The triplane was seen to crash in our lines by other pilots and the other occupant proved to be Lieut. Werner Voss, who was killed."

Captain McCudden has the final epitaph for a fine German fighter pilot and hero “ shall never forget my admiration for that German pilot, who single handed, fought seven of us for ten minutes.”

Image

Fake headlines:

10,000 SOCIALISTS SHOUT FOR PEACE

KAISER GOES TO RUMANIA

Secondary Article

Battle of Menin Ridge Road ends

This battle eneded today and has been an Australian effort as part of the series of British Иbite and hold’ attacks which began in July this year. Collectively these operations have become known as ИThe Third Battle of Ypres’. ИBite and hold’ represents a new thinking in the tactics of warfare whereby infantry advances small distances initiated and supported by artillery and aeroplanes working in harmony, then consolidate their position. This is a move away from previous tactics of rapid advances without consolidation, which left our troops extended and vulnerable to counter attacks and often holding a salient into enemy territory surrounded on three sides.
After moving through Ypres, the First and Second Australian Divisions manned the front lines opposite Glencorse Wood. Following a five-day bombardment, the two Australian divisions advanced at 5.40am on 20 September. They were in the centre of an assault by 11 British divisions along Westhoek Ridge facing Glencorse Wood
Enemy opposition was quickly overcome although a machine-gun checked the advance of one battalion for a moment. Lieutenant Frederick Birks and Corporal William Johnston instantly rushed the enemy machine-gun position. They were met with bombs and Johnston was badly wounded, but Birks went on alone, killed the remainder of the enemy and captured the machine-gun. Shortly afterwards he took a small party and attacked another strong point occupied by about 25 of the enemy, killing some and capturing an officer and 15 men. Corporal Johnston has been commended for the Military Medal. Lieutenant Birks, who was killed the following day, has been recommended for the Victoria Cross.
The final objective, 1,500 metres from the start line, was secured in two stages with one-hour and two-hour pauses in between. Although the artillery provided good cover for the Australian infantry and prevented some enemy counter-attacks from being launched there was still hard fighting against pillboxes and other strong points. By noon yesterday, the Australians had taken all the objectives and were at the western end of Polygon Wood. Enemy artillery fire was constant throughout the battle but on 21 September became more accurate targeting Иpillboxes’ captured by the Australians.
It is estimated that both the Allied troops and the Germans have suffered similar casualties although one Allied General has been reported as being “Well pleased” with the outcome.

Image

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#93 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 12:30

HotTom just pick a date as above or pick an event you want to write about and find the date nearest that event (that's what I did I looked at when Voss died and when the nearest paper was to that time) write the article and then google other headlines and events from that date to get fake headlines and secondary article.

Takes about an hour or so to do one whole paper if you work fast - and you can do it about things you are interested in.

Incidentally if anyone else is interested you could always look for a date your favourite plane entered service and do an artilce about it and how it will help the war effort (if you don't want to write a historic article)
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#94 =J99=Sizzlorr

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 13:00

Fake headers

19170423:

Infantry fights near Arras under way.
English attack on Arras collapsed.
Nothing of importance at the k. and k. fronts.

19170604:

Brussilow is now the new Russian chief commander.
Seizure of the German ships in Brazil.
The Italian losses in the 10th Isonzo battle.

19170924:

Heavy artillery fight in Flanders.
German victories at the Euphrates.



This should be proof read by some native english speakers
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#95 hq_Jorri

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 14:06

So should articles/headers be about the day before date requested?
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#96 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 14:28

@Jorri - or the same day or even a few days before - it doesn't really matter I don't think (as long as it's not for something after that day)
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#97 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 14:58

18th September 1916

"Tanks" see action for the 1st time at Battle of Flers-Courcelette on the Somme


Anyone with an interest in tanks/ground war want to write an article on this? HotTom?
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#98 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 15:18

FAO HAN:

Secondary article for 22 April 1918


Battle of the Lys Continues

The German offensive led by General Ludendorff which was launched on the 9th of this month continues to rage in the Lys Region. This is the second German offensive since the beginning of March when the battles fought in the Somme region took a heavy toll on aeroplanes and soldiers on the Allied side and threatened to break through to Paris. The River Lys forms the boundary between General Horne’s First Army (south of the river) and General Plumer’s Second Army (north of the river). The German attack seems to have been focused on pushing through south of the Lys on 9 April, and driving north west to the rail centre at Hazebrouck, while a second army led by General von Armin’s has struck between the Lys and Ypres.

The battle was preceded by a well planned artillery bombardment, lasting from the evening of 7 April until 4 am on 9 April. Once the bombardment was over, the German army attacked. The brunt of their attack fell on the 2nd Portuguese Division, close to Nueve Chapelle, which collapsed under the strain, retreating five miles. General Horne has been forced to pull his entire line back to prevent a gap developing.
On 10 April von Armin’s Fourth Army launched their attack. The village of Messines changed hands yet again, having been fought over in the three battles of Ypres. At this point, with the Germans only five miles from Hazebrouck, Field Marshall Haig requested reinforcements from the new Allied commander, Gerneral Foch but Foch initially was unable to move troops north and had faced resistance from General Pétain who had command of the requested reinforcements.

On the 11th of this month after moving reinforcements in the shape of the 5th and 33rd British Divisions and the 1st Australian Division. Haig issued his well reported “Backs to the wall” order – “With our backs to the wall and believing in the justice of our cause each us must fight on to the end”. On 14th of April Foch was promoted to General-in-Chief of the Allied Armies, giving him enough authority to move French units to the Lys and relieve some of the pressure on the British and Australian soldiers fighting there.

Despite this help, Plumer has been forced to withdraw from the Passchendaele Ridge and the bitter fighting continues.

Image
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#99 sturmkraehe

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 15:24

Is there a tool, that allows me to check spelling, grammar and counting signs? Except Words?
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#100 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 15:24

FAO Han 6th May 1918 Fake Headlines

GERMANS USE NEW GAS; HURL IT IN BOTTLES

FINNS ASK RUSSIANS TO SURRENDER FORT

British Guns Harass Enemy's Roads And Assembly Places

German Airmen Now Attacking Dutch Fishermen in North Sea

(Use which ever ones are best)
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#101 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 15:25

Is there a tool, that allows me to check spelling, grammar and counting signs? Except Words?

If you PM me it I'll check it for you and send it back to you - or is it not in English? (I'm using Word)
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#102 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 15:35

20th May 1918 Fake Headlines:

AMERICANS CHECK 3 GERMAN ATTACKS

HOW BRITAIN FIGHTS WITH SUBMARINES

PRAGUE PUTS BAN ON ALL MEETINGS

LT S JACOB WINS FRENCH WAR CROSS & PALM FOR DOWNING BALLOON & 2 ENEMY PLANES
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#103 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 19:31

Fake Headlines 08/04/1918

RFC & RNAS Amalgamated into Royal Air Force

647th Field Company Royal Engineers Disbanded

Main Article:

Von Richthofen: 3 Victories in 2 days

Manfred von Richthofen is an unstoppable force if communiqués from German High Command are to be believed. The leader of the “Flying Circus” – several German squadrons (Jastas) – is reported to have downed three allied aeroplanes in the last two days bringing his total to 77 confirmed victories.

Von Richthofen , who is nicknamed the ИRed Baron’ by the British because he paints his machines predominantly red, is Germany’s leading ace and a recipient of their highest award, the Order pour le’Merite (known as the Blue Max by German pilots). The French pilots however know him by the more sinister moniker of the “Red Devil”

It is claimed that Richthofen is the pilot that shot down British ace Lanoe Hawker in 1916. His latest three victories have come whilst flying his all red Fokker Triplane the first came on the afternoon of the sixth of April when he shot down in flames a Sopwith Camel near Bois de Hamel. Von Richthofen’s combat report released via the German High Command reads as follows:

With five of my planes of Jasta 11, we attacked several enemy one-seaters at low altitude, flying north-east of Villers-Bretonneux. The English plane, which I attacked started to burn after only a few shots from my guns. Then it crashed burning near the little wood north-east of Villers-Bretonneux, where it continued burning on the ground.

The second and third came within thirty-five minutes of each other yesterday morning near Hangard and Villiers-Bretonneux. Von Richthofen records destroying another Sopwith Camel and a Spad however reports from the Royal Air Force headquarters report two Sopwith Camels of 73 Squadron missing so it is more likely he was mistaken.

This seemingly invincible pilot is becoming a thorn in the side of the fledgling Royal Air Force in France and the sight of a scarlet triplane is beginning to strike fear into all Allied pilots. How many more victories will this “Red Devil” add to his score?

Image

Secondary Article


Kaiser Visits Front Lines

Kaiser Wilhelm, German Emperor and King of Prussia, returned to the Western front on Saturday and conferred with Field Marshal von Hindenburg and General Ludendorff, a dispatch from Berlin forwarded by the Copenhagen correspondent of the Exchange Telegraph Company says. Both Hindenburg and General Ludendorff were instrumental in planning and commanding the German offensive of March, an attack that very nearly broke through to Paris. Reports received from Allied headquarters suggest that another German offensive may be imminent as they try to force a victory before the might of the American military can reinforce the Allied troop concentrations on the Western Front.

It is believed the Kaiser intends on also visiting Romania in the next few days.Dr Richard von Kühlmann, the German Secretary for Foreign affairs, returned to the German capital on Saturday from Karlsruhe, where he had a long conversation with Kaiser Wilhelm about Rumanian peace conditions.

An independent state since 1878 and ruled by a constitutional order with a strong monarchy and an oligarchic parliamentary system, Romania took no part in the First Balkan War of 1912-13, fought to drive the Ottomans out of the western Balkans. In the Second Balkan War of June-July 1913 it gained Southern Dobruja from Bulgaria.

At the outset of the war Romania remained neutral despite its alliance commitments to Austria. They joined the war on the Allied side in August 1916 after receiving territorial promises. Romanian forces moved into Transylvania but were driven out within two months. By January 1917 German-Austrian and Bulgarian offensives had overrun most of the country. Until recently the government was sitting in Laşi in eastern Moldavia, in lands held by their former Russian allies.

However as Russia left the war earlier this year it is increasingly likely that it will be forced to accept terms that will make the country a client of Germany and Austria.

Image
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#104 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 11:08

Fake headers

19170423:

Infantry battles near Arras under way.
English attack on Arras fails.
Nothing of importance at the k. and k. fronts.

19170604:

Brussilow named the new Russian chief commander.
Seizure of the German ships in Brazil.
The Italian losses in the 10th Isonzo battle. (Heavy Italian Losses in 10th Isonzo Battle? Italians Lose 10th Isonzo Battle?)

19170924:

Heavy artillery fight in Flanders.
German victories on the Euphrates.



This should be proof read by some native english speakers

Just made a couple of corrections for you otherwise great!
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#105 sturmkraehe

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 11:26

Reading the nice article written by Tom I would like to ask a question to Han: these articles, shall they be written from the perspective of a journalist of a paper in an Entente country or completely neutral (like from Switzerland)?
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#106 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 11:34

I've been trying to keep mine as neutral as possible - as if from Switzerland or America (before it declared war)

It's difficult not to write from one mindset or the other though…

As Churchill said "History is written by the victors"
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#107 sturmkraehe

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 12:11

Here are mine for November 4th, 1918

Someone may be so kind to check my English grammar and expression (orthography should have been automatically checked by OpenOffice - NB to Tom: Thank you for your offer. Meanwhile I found the excellent tool OpenOffice that is a sort of Free word program and also contains calculation sheets apparantly similar to Excel)

Text form:
main_AustrianArmisticeSigned.txt
AUSTRIAN ARMISTICE SIGNED.

19181104_AustrianArmisticeSigned_header.txt
WAR WITH AUSTRIA ENDS

19171104_AustrianArmisticeSigned.txt
Diaz signs Armistice and Hostilities Cease To-day.
ITALY'S HOUR OF TRIUMPH
The following was issued through the Press Bureau from 10, Downing-street, last evening:
A telephone message has been received from the Prime Minister in Paris to say that the news has just come in that Austria-Hungary, the last of Germany's props, has gone out of the war.
An armistice was signed by General Diaz this afternoon, and is to come into operation to-morrow at 3 o'clock.
The terms of the armistice will be published on Tuesday.

Following the assassination of the Austrian successor to the throne, Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie, in Sarajevo on June 28th, 1914, Austria-Hungary issued an ultimatum to the Serbs four weeks later claiming the assassination to have been orchestrated by the Serbian government. Some demands within this ultimatum would have seen the Serbs giving up partially their sovereignty which was rejected by the Serbian government.
Consequently Serbia and Austria-Hungary partially mobilized their armies preparing for a locally contained war. Austria-Hungary received unconditional support from the Kaiser while the Tzar backed Serbia militarily. Russia herself started to mobilize on July 27th. One day later the Austrian monarchy declared war on Serbia.
With Russia rejecting German demands to demobilize, the German Reich declared war on Russia on August, 1st, prompting France to mobilize her troops.
While Russian troops entered East Prussia, Germany attacked Belgium in order to achieve quick victory over France in the attempt to avoid a war on two fronts. This incited the British government to enter the war on the Entente's side. The war has begun.

While Austria-Hungary lost Galicia that was occupied by Russian troops in the first stages of the war in 1914 and having been obliged to retreat her troops to the southern parts of the Carpathes after a severe defeat at Lemberg, Galicia, Austria's several attempts to gain the initiative in Serbia all failed in the final months of 1914.

On May 23rd, 1915 Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary. The following Italian Campaign claimed high casualties on both sides. Neither side could make a decisive break-through on the Italian front or gain a significant advantage until October 1917, when Austrian troops broke through near the river Isonzo near the villages of Flitsch and Tolmein. Nearly 200,000 Italian soldiers had to share the fate of captivity while their troops were thrown back to the river Piave.

The USA entered the war in Europe in 1917 and consequently declared war on Austria-Hungary in December 1917.

The Austrian armistice was preceded by the ever increasing tendencies of disintegration of the Austrian-Hungarian multiethnic state. October 1918 saw the creation of the states of Czechoslovakia, Serbia, Croatia, and Slovenia. Galicia joined the newly emerging state of Poland.

Finally, the Austrian troops suffered a severe blow when Italian troops broke through at the river Piave on October 29th.

19181104_AustrianArmisticeSigned.jpg (showing the occupation of Trieste by Italian troops)
Image

19181104_100000Prisoners_header.txt
100,000 PRISONERS

19181104_100000Prisoners.txt
The Converging Move in the Trentino.

ITALIAN OFFICIAL, Sunday.-Our troops have occupied Trent and have landed at Trieste. The Italian tricolour is flying on the castle of the Buon Consiglio and over the tower of St. Guisto.
The cavalry have entered Udine.
Previous to the above announcement of Austria's capitulation the news had come of the re-occupation of Belgrade by the Serbs, of the seizure of the whole Austrian Fleet by the Jugo-Slavs, of the Italian landing at Trieste, and of the utter rout of the Austrian Armies in Italy, with the loss of over 100,000 prisoners.
The demand for the Kaiser's abdication is said to be spreading to the middle and upper classes in Germany. A significantly worded Imperial rescript on the constitutional changes is taken in some quarters as an answer to this demand.

The 7th and 1st Armies have entered the struggle, storming with great impetus the enemy's defenses still intact opposite them. The 7th Army, having broken through the enemy's fortifications at the Sella del Tonale [Swiss frontier region], is advancing in the Vermiglio Valley, has forced the Vall Assa [the line of approach to Trent since occupied], and has taken the Col Santo, north of Pasubio.
The advance of the other armies is commencing irresistibly on the Tonezza and Abiago plateaus, in the Sugana Valley, and in the valleys of the Cismon, the Cordevole, and the Piave, and in the plains.
On the Tagliamento, the cavalry is sustaining bitter combats against the enemy, who, surprised on this side of the river, is fighting with great stubbornness.
The total number of prisoners ascertained reaches 100,000. The guns counted amount to more than 2,000.

SOURCES:
Daily News of November 4th, 1918
Wikipedia http://de.wikipedia....rster_Weltkrieg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://de.wikipedia....rster_Weltkrieg

Attached Files


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#108 sturmkraehe

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 12:18

In the Daily News I found some interesting additional feats of November 4th, but I did not choose them to be a major feature (as the DN didn't bring them on first page either)

I just copied the newspaper text here …

Attached Files


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#109 hq_Jorri

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 12:24

I find it really hard to stay within the limits of the max characters so I don't succeed everywhere, I'm also not a good writer so someone might want to review these.

If they're any use at all, I'll do some for the remaining issues as well - surely there's something in there that can be used or that's food for a full article.


vol - no - extra - date - status
11 - 19 - 0 - 19160904 - required

- British take Guillemont
First victory in new offensive

- Central powers invade Romania


11 - 20 - 0 - 19160918 - required

- Hindenburg reveals plans
Major defence line on west front

(Hindenburg announces the construction of the Hindenburg line)

- Egypt sees Turks in retreat
Australians win 20 miles

11 - 21 - 0 - 19161002 - required

-British tank victory
village of Thiepval taken

(13 tanks lead this attack - might be a nice addition on Tom's headline about the first use of tanks)

11 - 22 - 0 - 19161016 - required

-Diplomat in Arabia
Captain T.E. Lawrence

(hard to come up with a headline, don't actually like this one, but this is of course Lawrence of Arabia as he would later become known so might be interesting. He arrived on the 16th as advisor to prince Feisal.)

- Italian offensive fails
8th Battle of Isonzo

(started oct 9th, ended oct 12th: Italians win 3km from Austrian-Hungarians but lose 24.000 men)

11 - 23 - 0 - 19161030 - required

-Tragic death of leading ace
Oswald Boelcke dies in collision

(food for a major article????????????? surely!)

- French counter-attack Verdun
6000 prisoners taken

11 - 24 - 0 - 19161113 - required

- Seven German destroyers sunk
Success with Russian mines

- I can't think of a headline within the given limits for this one: on the 5th, the Central Powers announce Polish sovereignty and the creation of the Kingdom of Poland. Their motivation is to recruit more poles into their army, which some do, but many Polish think the offer isn't good enough.

11 - 25 - 0 - 19161127 - required

- French battleship "Suffren" sunk
Another victim to U-boat war (25th)

- Greek declare war on Germany (23rd)

(this was a temprary government who gave in to British pressure I think, since many British troops were stationed in Greece)

- British offensive fails
Million people lost at the Somme

(18th, the battle of Ancre ends and calls in the end of their Somme offensive. 420.000 British casualties, 205.000 French, 500.000 German. Though they hardly made any progress, the offensive speeds up the German decision to retreat to the Hindenburg line)

- Germany suffer shortages
Sea Blockade sea takes toll

(the newest troops are all under 19 years of age and many of them suffer medical problems due to malnutrition - 13th of November)

11 - 26 - 0 - 19161211 - required

- London under attack!
10 victims to German bombers

(November 28, first attack on London by bombers if I'm right)

- New British leadership
David Lloyd George steps up (december 5)

- Germany introduces Hilfsdienstgesetz
All men from 17 to 60 required to aid war machine

(yeah way too long I know)

- Germans capture Bucharest
Romanians in retreat (december 6)

11 - 27 - 0 - 19161225 - required

- LLoyd George preaches war
No talk of peace in first speech

(we'd rather trust an unbroken army than broken trust) (december 19)

- French success at Verdun
Losses both sides top 330.000 (december 15)

- French changing of the guard
Two generals replaced

(Joffre replaces Nivelle as commander of troops in north and north east, Franchet replaces Foch on the same day - december 12)

12 - 01 - 0 - 19170101 - required

- Douglas Haig promoted
General now Field Marshal

- Russian monk murdered
Noblemen kill Rasputin

- German U-boat success
1 month sees 167 ships sunk

(70 of them were neutral!)
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#110 hq_Jorri

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 18:51

12 - 02 - 0 - 19170115 - required

- British invade Palestine
Objective: Jerusalem

12 - 03 - 0 - 19170129 - required

- Secret telegram exposed!
Germany suggests alliance to Mexico

- Wilson's peace proposal
Nobody listens

- United States are stirring
General Pershing ordered back from Mexico

(of course this is all leading up to the US entering the war!)

12 - 04 - 0 - 19170212 - required

- Germany launches U-boat campaign
No ship is safe!

- US stop diplomacy
Another merchant ship sunk

That last one is pretty crap, but maybe a main article is in order here. The Germans start a new, full blown U-boat campaign where they are ordered to attack each and every ship, and not return to port without having spent their munitions/torpedoes. he Americans break all diplomatic contacts with Germany in response, and many nations follow suit, including Chine and and some Latin American countries. On the same day as Wilson's speech, the Housatonic, a merchant ship, is sunk without warning.

I'm finding I'm not very good at writing these headlines but if there's anything in them you can salvage please do.
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#111 HotTom

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 17:58

Han,

I need a little guidance here.

I've spent several hours today trying to match up "required dates" with major events and not many line up exactly.

But some "required dates" are within a few days of the actual dates of major events.

For example, a few posts above Jorri (and I'm not faulting Jorri) says: "British take Guillemont
First victory in new offensive" as the event for the "required date" of Sept. 4, 1916.

The problem is the British didn't take Guillemont until two days later, on Sept. 6, 1916. The attack began on Sept. 3, so I suppose it could say the British are advancing on Guillemont on the "required" Sept. 4 date.

http://www.firstworldwar.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.firstworldwar.com, which has the best day-to-day timeline I've found shows nothing of any great significance happening on Sept. 4:

http://www.firstworl.../1916_09_04.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.firstworl.../1916_09_04.htm

Same with April 8, 1918, another "required date" on which nothing of great significance appears to have occured:

http://www.firstworl.../1918_04_08.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.firstworl.../1918_04_08.htm

But on the next day, April 9, the Battle of Lys – the second major German 1918 spring offensive on the Western Front – began.

Similarly, Jorri uses the "required date" of January 29, 1917 for "Secret telegram exposed!
Germany suggests alliance to Mexico" but the news of The Zimmerman Telegram didn't appear in the American press until more than a month later, on March 1, 1917.

I'm not sure whether you want whatever actually happened on those "required dates" (not much in these two cases and, indeed, in many others I've checked) or significant events that actually took place shortly before or after these dates.

Or, maybe, I should include those that took place shortly before the "required date" but not any that took place even shortly afterward?

Please explain how and why the "required" dates were chosen. Were they meant to be tied to specific events? Or just whatever happened on that specific day?

The dates of other WWI air combat events are not on the "required" list: For example, Guynemer was killed on Sept. 11, 1917, Mannock died on July 26, 1918. Newspaper articles are available for both but neither are on the "required dates" list.

But Sept. 10, 1917, the day before Guynemer was killed is a "required date" as is July 29, 1918, three days after Mannock was killed.

Should I include them? Using Mannock's death seems logical to me since it was three days prior. But I think it will look kind of odd to say "Guynemer will die tomorrow."

I'm glad to invest the time and effort but I'm still not clear on exactly what you are looking for.

Any help will be appreciated.

Thanks,

HT
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#112 hq_Jorri

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 19:58

Similarly, Jorri uses the "required date" of January 29, 1917 for "Secret telegram exposed!
Germany suggests alliance to Mexico" but the news of The Zimmerman Telegram didn't appear in the American press until more than a month later, on March 1, 1917.

That's my failing since I didn't check when it went public….

As for other dates I'm posting (Thanks for checking!!!!), the book I'm using might not be the most trustworthy.

It's a book listing day by day the major events in WWI (making life easy with a task like this) but I don't know how solid it is as a source.
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#113 HotTom

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 20:05

No blame, J.

Take a look at the timeline in http://www.firstworldwar.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">http://www.firstworldwar.com

It's spot on (if a bit too "Allied-centric"):

"Sourced from the Chronology of the War, originally published between 1918-20, and drawn from contemporary sources by Edward Gleichen, the 'On This Day' entries provide a fascinating view of the war as it was viewed at the time."

HT
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#114 hq_Jorri

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 20:07

Keeping that in mind, any use in me going on and doing more dates?
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#115 HotTom

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 20:28

I'm going to wait for some guidance from Han.

I'm not sure if they want events for JUST those dates or also events that were CLOSE to those dates.

HT
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#116 Tom-Cundall

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 20:38

Those dates have been selected as they are exactly 2 weeks apart. Any event that has happened in the preceding 2 weeks (including that day) are fine. It was a static war so if you stick to just that day then it'll be too limited and we'll miss key events.

If necessary just say "News just received from our correspondent in France (Or according to a communique from the French Government etc) is that Jorri from the Hellequins Squadron was confirmed killed last week. On the morning of 23rd March Jorri and his squadron attacked a flight of German scout planes and Jorri was last seen pursuing a German biplane East toward Lille…" or something like that (but with real historical events)

There would have been a delay between some events and the reporting of them for secrecy, propaganda or just the fog of war so it's perfectly acceptable.

Let's get it done and worry about neatening it up at a later date.
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#117 HotTom

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 20:58

Those dates have been selected as they are exactly 2 weeks apart. Any event that has happened in the preceding 2 weeks (including that day) are fine. It was a static war so if you stick to just that day then it'll be too limited and we'll miss key events.

If necessary just say "News just received from our correspondent in France (Or according to a communique from the French Government etc) is that Jorri from the Hellequins Squadron was confirmed killed last week. On the morning of 23rd March Jorri and his squadron attacked a flight of German scout planes and Jorri was last seen pursuing a German biplane East toward Lille…" or something like that (but with real historical events)

There would have been a delay between some events and the reporting of them for secrecy, propaganda or just the fog of war so it's perfectly acceptable.

Let's get it done and worry about neatening it up at a later date.

T-C,

That makes sense.

I'll go ahead and do it that way (everything in the preceding two weeks) and hope it's okay with 777.

Thx,

HT
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#118 SYN_Vander

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 06:03

Yes, I think that's the way to do it. If you look into the newspapers of the time you will often find articles with dates going back 1 to 5 days prior to the publishing date.
Also, it would be nice to stick to the same sort of language /writing style they used back then. Quite fun to read nowadays, although all in all, I must say little has changed over 100 years!
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#119 Han

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:33

I'm going to wait for some guidance from Han.

I'm not sure if they want events for JUST those dates or also events that were CLOSE to those dates.

HT
Check here:
Re: New career developing assisting.
OFFCOURSE, if article (or fake-article header) describes an event which have occured not in date of newspaper release - it will be included in closest newspaper release after event date.
So you're free to wrote articles to any date in specified range (1.sep.1916 - 11.nov.1918).
If you want to be sure that your article is hits some specific newspaper release -
check that event date is between required newspaper release and a previous release.

Those dates have been selected as they are exactly 2 weeks apart. Any event that has happened in the preceding 2 weeks (including that day) are fine. It was a static war so if you stick to just that day then it'll be too limited and we'll miss key events.

If necessary just say "News just received from our correspondent in France (Or according to a communique from the French Government etc) is that Jorri from the Hellequins Squadron was confirmed killed last week. On the morning of 23rd March Jorri and his squadron attacked a flight of German scout planes and Jorri was last seen pursuing a German biplane East toward Lille…" or something like that (but with real historical events)

There would have been a delay between some events and the reporting of them for secrecy, propaganda or just the fog of war so it's perfectly acceptable.

Let's get it done and worry about neatening it up at a later date.

Right.

ALSO

It's better to note (in post or in file name) the article actualization date, NOT newspaper release date. It will be more useful.
Or, you may note them both (article actualization date and supposed newspaper release for this article).

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#120 Han

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 11:56

2 Tom-Cundall, sturmkraehe, =J99=Sizzlorr:
Thank you! Way to go!

Others: Guys, please take a part in this help, this is VERY actual and necessary!
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